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Japan landslide: Rescuers race to find survivors

Rescuers have been searching desperately for survivors in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture where a landslide killed at least 42 people.At least 43 others are missing, officials told the Kyodo news agency. Dozens of homes in a residential area close to a mountain on the outskirts of Hiroshima were buried.Among those killed was one 53-year old rescue worker who died when a second landslide struck after he had already pulled several people to safety.

Rescuers have been searching desperately for survivors in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture where a landslide killed at least 42 people.

At least 43 others are missing, officials told the Kyodo news agency.

Police quoted by the agency say that more people could be unaccounted for, buried by mudslides and not yet reported as missing.

About 3,000 rescue personnel have been trying to remove mud and debris hampering the search.

Torrential rains have led to the evacuation of up to 100,000 people.

Experts say the chances of survival for people trapped without food or water in such a disaster decreases significantly after the first 72 hours, which passed early on Saturday.

On Friday afternoon all searches in the area were called off when the shape of nearby hillsides appeared to change, raising fears that more landslips could be on the way.

"Operations in (two districts) were halted as hills there were becoming misshapen," a Hiroshima police spokesman is quoted as saying by the AFP news agency.

The landslides happened after the equivalent of a month's rain fell in the 24 hours up to Wednesday morning, Japan's weather agency said.

Dozens of homes in a residential area close to a mountain on the outskirts of Hiroshima were buried.

Among those killed was one 53-year old rescue worker who died when a second landslide struck after he had already pulled several people to safety.

Reports said he was killed while holding a toddler he was trying to rescue. A father was handing his small son to the rescue worker only to see both engulfed as a fresh mudslide swept down the mountain.

"There was a really strange smell, a very raw, earthy smell. When we opened a window to see what was going on, the entire hillside just came down, with a crackling noise, a thundering noise," Reuters news agency quotes one woman who survived as telling local television.

She and her husband fled moments before mud gushed through their house, leaving boulders where they had been sleeping, Reuters says.

Correspondents add that a number of children are thought to have perished in the disaster.

Much of central and southern Japan is mountainous, with many homes nestled into steep slopes.

Last year, a typhoon triggered landslides on Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, that left 35 people dead.

BBC
23/08
13 Points
1 2 3 4 5

Japan landslide: Rescuers race to find survivors

Rescuers have been searching desperately for survivors in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture where a landslide killed at least 42 people.At least 43 others are missing, officials told the Kyodo news agency. Dozens of homes in a residential area close to a mountain on the outskirts of Hiroshima were buried.Among those killed was one 53-year old rescue worker who died when a second landslide struck after he had already pulled several people to safety.

Rescuers have been searching desperately for survivors in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture where a landslide killed at least 42 people.

At least 43 others are missing, officials told the Kyodo news agency.

Police quoted by the agency say that more people could be unaccounted for, buried by mudslides and not yet reported as missing.

About 3,000 rescue personnel have been trying to remove mud and debris hampering the search.

Torrential rains have led to the evacuation of up to 100,000 people.

Experts say the chances of survival for people trapped without food or water in such a disaster decreases significantly after the first 72 hours, which passed early on Saturday.

On Friday afternoon all searches in the area were called off when the shape of nearby hillsides appeared to change, raising fears that more landslips could be on the way.

"Operations in (two districts) were halted as hills there were becoming misshapen," a Hiroshima police spokesman is quoted as saying by the AFP news agency.

The landslides happened after the equivalent of a month's rain fell in the 24 hours up to Wednesday morning, Japan's weather agency said.

Dozens of homes in a residential area close to a mountain on the outskirts of Hiroshima were buried.

Among those killed was one 53-year old rescue worker who died when a second landslide struck after he had already pulled several people to safety.

Reports said he was killed while holding a toddler he was trying to rescue. A father was handing his small son to the rescue worker only to see both engulfed as a fresh mudslide swept down the mountain.

"There was a really strange smell, a very raw, earthy smell. When we opened a window to see what was going on, the entire hillside just came down, with a crackling noise, a thundering noise," Reuters news agency quotes one woman who survived as telling local television.

She and her husband fled moments before mud gushed through their house, leaving boulders where they had been sleeping, Reuters says.

Correspondents add that a number of children are thought to have perished in the disaster.

Much of central and southern Japan is mountainous, with many homes nestled into steep slopes.

Last year, a typhoon triggered landslides on Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, that left 35 people dead.

BBC
23/08
1 Points
1 2 3 4

Japan landslide: Death toll rises to 39 in Hiroshima

Heavy rain has hampered rescue operations in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture where a deadly landslide killed at least 39 people. Dozens of homes in a residential area close to a mountain on the outskirts of Hiroshima were buried.The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes says with the leap in the death toll, the eventual number of victims could be close to 100.Among those killed was one 53-year old rescue worker who died when a second landslide struck after he had already pulled several people to safety.

Heavy rain has hampered rescue operations in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture where a deadly landslide killed at least 39 people.

The number of people missing has jumped to 51, officials say, after police cross-checked information with fire crews, Kyodo news agency reported.

About 3,000 rescue personnel are working in the area but rain on Thursday night suspended the search.

Torrential rains have led to an evacuation for up to 100,000.

Officials fear that more landslides will occur.

The landslides happened after the equivalent of a month's rain fell in the 24 hours up to Wednesday morning, Japan's weather agency said.

Dozens of homes in a residential area close to a mountain on the outskirts of Hiroshima were buried.

The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes says with the leap in the death toll, the eventual number of victims could be close to 100.

Among those killed was one 53-year old rescue worker who died when a second landslide struck after he had already pulled several people to safety.

Reports said he was killed while holding a toddler he was trying to rescue. A father was handing his small son to the rescue worker only to see both engulfed as a fresh mudslide swept down the mountain.

"There was a really strange smell, a very raw, earthy smell. When we opened a window to see what was going on, the entire hillside just came down, with a crackling noise, a thundering noise," Reuters cites one woman who survived talking to local television.

She and her husband fled moments before mud gushed through their house leaving boulders where they had been sleeping, Reuters says.

Correspondents add that a number children are thought to have perished in the disaster.

Much of central and southern Japan is mountainous, with many homes nestled into steep slopes.

Last year, a typhoon triggered landslides on Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, that left 35 people dead.

BBC
22/08
17 Points
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Rescuers comb Japan landslide site

The landslide happened in a residential area near a mountain in the Hiroshima city outskirts. Aerial images (this taken on 20 August 2014) showed the damage caused by the landslide. Rescuers are still combing through the site of a landslide triggered on Wednesday by torrential rain in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture.At least 39 people are now known to have died and rescue teams are working to find more survivors. Dozens of houses were buried as entire hillsides collapsed.

Rescuers are still combing through the site of a landslide triggered on Wednesday by torrential rain in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture.

At least 39 people are now known to have died and rescue teams are working to find more survivors.

The landslide happened in a residential area near a mountain in the Hiroshima city outskirts. Dozens of houses were buried as entire hillsides collapsed.

The equivalent of a month's rain fell in the lead-up to Wednesday morning.

Mud gushed through the ground floor of the homes engulfed by the landslides.

Aerial images (this taken on 20 August 2014) showed the damage caused by the landslide. Military troops have been deployed at the request of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to assist in rescue operations.

Among the dead, reports local media say, was a 53-year-old rescuer who was battling to rescue those trapped when a second slurry of mud came through. Reports say he died with a toddler in his arms.

Trees fell and houses were buried in mud and rocks, as rescue teams worked their way towards homes.

Despite intensive search operations, seven people still remain missing.

BBC
22/08
2 Points
1 2 3 4

Japan landslide: Death toll rises to 39 in Hiroshima

Heavy rain has hampered rescue operations in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture where a deadly landslide killed at least 39 people. Dozens of homes in a residential area close to a mountain on the outskirts of Hiroshima were buried.The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes says with the leap in the death toll, the eventual number of victims could be close to 100.Among those killed was one 53-year old rescue worker who died when a second landslide struck after he had already pulled several people to safety.

Heavy rain has hampered rescue operations in Japan's Hiroshima prefecture where a deadly landslide killed at least 39 people.

The number of people missing has jumped to 51, officials say, after police cross-checked information with fire crews, Kyodo news agency reported.

About 3,000 rescue personnel are working in the area but rain on Thursday night suspended the search.

Torrential rains have led to an evacuation for up to 100,000.

Officials fear that more landslides will occur.

The landslides happened after the equivalent of a month's rain fell in the 24 hours up to Wednesday morning, Japan's weather agency said.

Dozens of homes in a residential area close to a mountain on the outskirts of Hiroshima were buried.

The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes says with the leap in the death toll, the eventual number of victims could be close to 100.

Among those killed was one 53-year old rescue worker who died when a second landslide struck after he had already pulled several people to safety.

Reports said he was killed while holding a toddler he was trying to rescue. A father was handing his small son to the rescue worker only to see both engulfed as a fresh mudslide swept down the mountain.

"There was a really strange smell, a very raw, earthy smell. When we opened a window to see what was going on, the entire hillside just came down, with a crackling noise, a thundering noise," Reuters cites one woman who survived talking to local television.

She and her husband fled moments before mud gushed through their house leaving boulders where they had been sleeping, Reuters says.

Correspondents add that a number children are thought to have perished in the disaster.

Much of central and southern Japan is mountainous, with many homes nestled into steep slopes.

Last year, a typhoon triggered landslides on Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, that left 35 people dead.

BBC
22/08
2 Points
1 2 3 4

Swiss train derailed in landslide

A train has derailed after a landslide near the Swiss ski resort of St Moritz, in what police describe as a "serious" accident. Email us at [email protected] adding 'Swiss train' in the heading, and include your contact details. But Wednesday's accident comes two days after three people died when their minibus was hit by a train in central Switzerland.Are you near St Moritz. Send your pictures and videos to [email protected] or text them to 61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (International).

A train has derailed after a landslide near the Swiss ski resort of St Moritz, in what police describe as a "serious" accident.

Swiss national radio reported that one carriage had plunged into a ravine and another was hanging from the rails.

The extent of casualties is unclear but officials say the injured have been taken to hospital by helicopter and ambulance.

The landslide happened after heavy rain in eastern Switzerland overnight.

Police spokesman Peter Faerber said some people had been slightly wounded, but could not immediately confirm the exact number of injured.

A passenger who was on the train told the German-language Swiss newspaper 20Minuten of his experience when the train made an emergency stop.

"We all rushed to the back of the carriage to put all of our weight there so that it wouldn't tip into the abyss," he said.

The accident occurred on a mountainous train line near Tiefencastel, between Chur and St Moritz in the region of Graubuenden.

The Swiss rail system is widely seen as among the safest in the world. But Wednesday's accident comes two days after three people died when their minibus was hit by a train in central Switzerland.

Are you near St Moritz? Did you witness the train derailment? Email us at [email protected] adding 'Swiss train' in the heading, and include your contact details.

Send your pictures and videos to [email protected] or text them to 61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (International). If you have a large file you can upload here.

Read the terms and conditions

BBC
13/08
14 Points
1

Three train cars derail into ravine after landslide in Switzerland leaving 11 injured

The accident happened after heavy rainfall overnight caused a landslide. Three carriages came off the lines and five people were seriously injured while six passengers were slightly hurt.One train car slid off the tracks onto a sleep slope and was halted by trees.

Three carriages came off the lines and five people were seriously injured while six passengers were slightly hurt.

One train car slid off the tracks onto a sleep slope and was halted by trees. The accident happened after heavy rainfall overnight caused a landslide.

The incident happened near the St Moritz ski resort in Switzerland and officials said passengers who were injured had been taken to hospital by helicopter and ambulance.

A passenger who was in one carriage told Swiss newspaper 20Minuten of how people onboard acted swiftly when the train made an emergency stop.

He said: "We all rushed to the back of the carriage to put all of our weight there so that it wouldn't tip into the abyss."

Dramatic pictures taken from the scene showed one carriage after it had plunged into the ravine while another dangled over it precariously.

Another shot showed a person in a stretcher being air lifted away from the scene of the accident by emergency services.

The train is operated by Rhaetische Bahn, which runs a network of narrow-gauge routes in Switzerland's mountainous south-eastern corner.

The derailment came two days after three people died when their mini bus was hit by a train in the country.

The Swiss rail system is widely seen as one of the safest in the world.

Accidents are rare however in 2010 the popular Glacier Express tourist train derailed in the Alps in southern Switzerland.

The incident left one person dead and injured 42 others.

Express
13/08
3 Points
1 2 3 4

Swiss train derailed in landslide

A train has derailed after a landslide near the Swiss ski resort of St Moritz, in what police describe as a "serious" accident. Email us at [email protected] adding 'Swiss train' in the heading, and include your contact details. But Wednesday's accident comes two days after three people died when their minibus was hit by a train in central Switzerland.Are you near St Moritz. Send your pictures and videos to [email protected] or text them to 61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (International).

A train has derailed after a landslide near the Swiss ski resort of St Moritz, in what police describe as a "serious" accident.

Swiss national radio reported that one carriage had plunged into a ravine and another was hanging from the rails.

The extent of casualties is unclear but officials say the injured have been taken to hospital by helicopter and ambulance.

The landslide happened after heavy rain in eastern Switzerland overnight.

Police spokesman Peter Faerber said some people had been slightly wounded, but could not immediately confirm the exact number of injured.

A passenger who was on the train told the German-language Swiss newspaper 20Minuten of his experience when the train made an emergency stop.

"We all rushed to the back of the carriage to put all of our weight there so that it wouldn't tip into the abyss," he said.

The accident occurred on a mountainous train line near Tiefencastel, between Chur and St Moritz in the region of Graubuenden.

The Swiss rail system is widely seen as among the safest in the world. But Wednesday's accident comes two days after three people died when their minibus was hit by a train in central Switzerland.

Are you near St Moritz? Did you witness the train derailment? Email us at [email protected] adding 'Swiss train' in the heading, and include your contact details.

Send your pictures and videos to [email protected] or text them to 61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (International). If you have a large file you can upload here.

Read the terms and conditions

BBC
13/08
0 Points
1

Massive landslide hits river near Nepal capital

A massive landslide has buried dozens of homes in Nepal, with eight people confirmed dead and many missing. The landslide has blocked the Sunkoshi river, east of the capital Kathmandu, forcing thousands of people to evacuate their homes and move to higher ground.Officials said army technicians were trying to unblock the river and allow the water to run off. Dozens of people die every year from flooding and landslides.Are you in the region.

A massive landslide has buried dozens of homes in Nepal, with eight people confirmed dead and many missing.

The landslide has blocked the Sunkoshi river, east of the capital Kathmandu, forcing thousands of people to evacuate their homes and move to higher ground.

Officials said army technicians were trying to unblock the river and allow the water to run off.

There are fears that the death toll will rise, as rescue work continues in the district of Sindhupalchowk.

Sindhupalchowk is 120 km (75 miles) east of Kathmandu.

"Police and army officials are trying to find the missing people and evacuate the villages on the riverside" a police official told AFP.

Officials said dozens of people were still missing.

The Arniko highway to Tibet has been closed and the area declared a "flood crisis zone" by the government.

Landslides are common during the June-September monsoon season in Nepal. Dozens of people die every year from flooding and landslides.

Are you in the region? Have you been affected by the landslide? You can email your experiences to [email protected]

BBC
02/08
13 Points
1

Massive landslide hits river near Nepal capital

A massive landslide has buried dozens of homes in Nepal, with eight people confirmed dead and many missing. The landslide has blocked the Sunkoshi river, east of the capital Kathmandu, forcing thousands of people to evacuate their homes and move to higher ground.Officials said army technicians were trying to unblock the river and allow the water to run off. Dozens of people die every year from flooding and landslides.Are you in the region.

A massive landslide has buried dozens of homes in Nepal, with eight people confirmed dead and many missing.

The landslide has blocked the Sunkoshi river, east of the capital Kathmandu, forcing thousands of people to evacuate their homes and move to higher ground.

Officials said army technicians were trying to unblock the river and allow the water to run off.

There are fears that the death toll will rise, as rescue work continues in the district of Sindhupalchowk.

Sindhupalchowk is 120 km (75 miles) east of Kathmandu.

"Police and army officials are trying to find the missing people and evacuate the villages on the riverside" a police official told AFP.

Officials said dozens of people were still missing.

The Arniko highway to Tibet has been closed and the area declared a "flood crisis zone" by the government.

Landslides are common during the June-September monsoon season in Nepal. Dozens of people die every year from flooding and landslides.

Are you in the region? Have you been affected by the landslide? You can email your experiences to [email protected]

BBC
02/08
1 Points
1 2 3 4 5

India landslide: Hopes fade for survivors as toll passes 50

Ms Lembe had woken up to breast-feed the baby when the landslide happened."I heard a loud thunder-like noise. I tried to run but the wall collapsed," she told our correspondent.

Hopes of finding any more survivors from a landslide that buried a village on Wednesday are fading, as the number of bodies found passed 50, officials said.

Bad weather is hampering rescue workers who are digging through mud in Malin village near Pune in Maharashtra state.

The landslide hit the village early in the day while people were sleeping.

Eight people were rescued in the first few hours, but no survivors have been found in the past 40 hours.

A large part of a hill collapsed on Malin. Its population of 150 to 200 tribal people were covered with tonnes of loose earth, mud and rocks.

"Miracles do happen, we will keep looking, but under current conditions it is very, very bleak," AFP news agency quoted Alok Avasthy, regional commandant of the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) at the scene, as saying.

By Friday, rescue workers had reached the main inhabited area and were continuing digging, the Associated Press quoted district official DD Kale as saying.

A total of 51 bodies - 22 women, 23 men and six children - had been recovered so far, he added.

Wailing relatives, mourning the loss of entire families, were at the scene, hoping and praying for some positive news. Survivors could be seen rummaging through the debris, trying to salvage their possessions.

The eight survivors are being treated in the local government hospital in Manchar town, some 60km from Malin, the BBC's Zubair Ahmed reports from Manchar.

Among them are 25-year-old Pramila Lembe and her three-month-old baby, who were rescued eight hours after the landslide.

Ms Lembe had woken up to breast-feed the baby when the landslide happened.

"I heard a loud thunder-like noise. I tried to run but the wall collapsed," she told our correspondent.

"I kept calling out for help while protecting my baby boy in my lap. Finally, rescue workers heard me and they pulled me out," she added.

The disaster in Malin only came to light when a bus passed by and the driver saw that the village had disappeared under masses of mud and earth, officials said.

Rescue operations were disrupted several times on Wednesday and Thursday after "very heavy rainfall" in the area.

Landslides are common in some parts of India during the monsoon, which runs from June to September.

More than 500 people died and several thousand people were listed as missing after floods and landslides hit the northern state of Uttarakhand in June last year.

BBC
01/08
20 Points
1 2 3 4 5

India landslide: Hopes fade for survivors as toll passes 50

Ms Lembe had woken up to breast-feed the baby when the landslide happened."I heard a loud thunder-like noise. I tried to run but the wall collapsed," she told our correspondent.

Hopes of finding any more survivors from a landslide that buried a village on Wednesday are fading, as the number of bodies found passed 50, officials said.

Bad weather is hampering rescue workers who are digging through mud in Malin village near Pune in Maharashtra state.

The landslide hit the village early in the day while people were sleeping.

Eight people were rescued in the first few hours, but no survivors have been found in the past 40 hours.

A large part of a hill collapsed on Malin. Its population of 150 to 200 tribal people were covered with tonnes of loose earth, mud and rocks.

"Miracles do happen, we will keep looking, but under current conditions it is very, very bleak," AFP news agency quoted Alok Avasthy, regional commandant of the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) at the scene, as saying.

By Friday, rescue workers had reached the main inhabited area and were continuing digging, the Associated Press quoted district official DD Kale as saying.

A total of 51 bodies - 22 women, 23 men and six children - had been recovered so far, he added.

Wailing relatives, mourning the loss of entire families, were at the scene, hoping and praying for some positive news. Survivors could be seen rummaging through the debris, trying to salvage their possessions.

The eight survivors are being treated in the local government hospital in Manchar town, some 60km from Malin, the BBC's Zubair Ahmed reports from Manchar.

Among them are 25-year-old Pramila Lembe and her three-month-old baby, who were rescued eight hours after the landslide.

Ms Lembe had woken up to breast-feed the baby when the landslide happened.

"I heard a loud thunder-like noise. I tried to run but the wall collapsed," she told our correspondent.

"I kept calling out for help while protecting my baby boy in my lap. Finally, rescue workers heard me and they pulled me out," she added.

The disaster in Malin only came to light when a bus passed by and the driver saw that the village had disappeared under masses of mud and earth, officials said.

Rescue operations were disrupted several times on Wednesday and Thursday after "very heavy rainfall" in the area.

Landslides are common in some parts of India during the monsoon, which runs from June to September.

More than 500 people died and several thousand people were listed as missing after floods and landslides hit the northern state of Uttarakhand in June last year.

BBC
01/08
9 Points
1 2 3 4 5

India landslide: Rescuers race to find survivors in Pune village as toll rises

Rescue workers in western India are working to locate survivors of a landslide that has claimed at least 30 lives and buried up to 200 people.Eight people have been rescued from the wreckage in Malin village, near the city of Pune in Maharashtra state. The only temple here - 35ft (11m) tall - is buried in the sludge.Rescue workers were hard at work trying to find survivors. At a local hospital, I heard doctors talking about a mass cremation of the bodies after the autopsies were completed.

Rescue workers in western India are working to locate survivors of a landslide that has claimed at least 30 lives and buried up to 200 people.

Eight people have been rescued from the wreckage in Malin village, near the city of Pune in Maharashtra state.

Teams worked through the night but rain was hampering efforts to search for scores of people presumed trapped under the mud and debris.

The landslide hit the village early on Wednesday while people were sleeping.

Landslides are common in some parts of India during the monsoon, which runs from June to September.

A large part of a nearby hill collapsed on Malin, and its population of 150 to 200 tribal people were covered with tonnes of loose earth, mud and rocks.

"Everything on the mountain came down," said Suresh Jadhav, a district official, describing how a cascade of mud, rocks and uprooted trees swamped the area.

Rescue operations were disrupted on Thursday morning after "very heavy rainfall" in the area, Tripti Parule, a spokesperson for India's National Disaster Response Force said.

Maharashtra Chief Minister Prithviraj Chavan told the Press Trust of India news agency that more than 160 people were believed to be trapped in 44 houses buried under the rubble.

It was raining when I reached Malin village. The roads leading to it were clogged with ambulances and earth-moving vehicles.

What was once a thriving village ringed by mountains and hills has now turned into a dump of red mud and soil. The only temple here - 35ft (11m) tall - is buried in the sludge.

Rescue workers were hard at work trying to find survivors. Medics were treating the injured. As earth-movers cleared the debris, I could see the top of many homes buried in the mud.

A local villager said it had taken a lot of time for the rescue workers and their vehicles to reach the village on Wednesday.

Since most of the homes were buried with their occupants inside, there were no people at the site to claim the bodies that were being taken out.

At a local hospital, I heard doctors talking about a mass cremation of the bodies after the autopsies were completed.

The Indian Express newspaper reported that a 25-year-old woman and her six-month-old baby were among the 10 people who had been rescued from the site.

"The woman and her baby were trapped in their house under the thatched roof... The mother was tightly holding the baby in her arms," Baban Kokane, the driver of the rescue vehicle, told the newspaper.

"We found them while removing the mud with the earth mover. Their house was wrapped in a thick layer of mud."

Prime Minister Narendra Modi described the loss of lives in the landslide as "saddening". Home Minister Rajnath Singh is travelling to Pune on Thursday to assess the situation.

More than 500 people died and several thousand people were listed as missing after floods and landslides hit the northern state of Uttarakhand in June last year.

BBC
31/07
1 Points
1 2 3

Indian landslide: Dozens trapped in village of Malin

You can email your experiences to [email protected], using the subject line 'Malin landslide'. At least 10 people have died after a landslide buried more than 40 houses and left 160 people trapped under debris in a village in western India.The first teams of emergency workers have arrived in Malin village near the city of Pune in Maharashtra state where the disaster happened.

At least 10 people have died after a landslide buried more than 40 houses and left 160 people trapped under debris in a village in western India.

The first teams of emergency workers have arrived in Malin village near the city of Pune in Maharashtra state where the disaster happened.

Rescuers trying to reach survivors caught under the debris are being hampered by bad weather.

Reports said that heavy rains had triggered the landslide.

Landslides are common in some parts of India during the monsoon rains, which run from June to September.

An official of India's National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) said difficult terrain in the hilly area was making rescue work difficult.

Senior local official Prabhakar Deshmukh told the Associated Press news agency that rescue workers were being hampered by rains and poor roads leading to the Ambegaon area where Malin is located, some 60km (37 miles) from the city of Pune, south-east of Mumbai, India's commercial capital.

Reports said debris from a hill near the village collapsed on homes early on Wednesday when people were sleeping.

Television pictures showed the side of a hill shaved off, with mud and water flowing below.

Local official Saurav Rao told the Press Trust of India that heavy machinery and 30 ambulances were being sent to the village.

"The exact number of casualties is not known as we are moving slowly to ensure that those trapped are removed safely," Mr Rao said.

More than 500 people died and several thousand people remain missing after floods and landslides hit the northern state of Uttarakhand in June last year.

Are you in the area? You can email your experiences to [email protected], using the subject line 'Malin landslide'. Or email your photos and videos to [email protected], with the same subject line.

Send your pictures and videos to [email protected] or text them to 61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (International). If you have a large file you can upload here.

Read the terms and conditions

BBC
30/07
13 Points
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