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Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner split over drinking and gambling

Jennifer Garner was done with Ben Affleck's drinking and gambling, which is why the pair is divorcing, sources reportedly told TMZ.So it wasn't waking up every morning to find Matt Damon finished off all the milk ... So he got dumped.The pair has reportedly been in therapy for more than two years and have pretty much been separated for ten months.Affleck, 43, and Garner, 42, began dating after starring together in 2003's "Daredevil."Tony Hicks writes celebrity commentary for the Bay Area News Group.

Jennifer Garner was done with Ben Affleck's drinking and gambling, which is why the pair is divorcing, sources reportedly told TMZ.

So it wasn't waking up every morning to find Matt Damon finished off all the milk ... again.

The pair, who have three kids together -- Violet, 9, Seraphina, 6, and Samuel, 3 -- announced their split Tuesday to People magazine.

TMZ's sources reportedly said both have their reasons for wanting to split up.

Affleck's gambling and drinking have supposedly escalated to the point "she couldn't take it anymore."

Sources close to Affleck reportedly said the couple just want to live separate lives.

Right. So he got dumped.

The pair has reportedly been in therapy for more than two years and have pretty much been separated for ten months.

Affleck, 43, and Garner, 42, began dating after starring together in 2003's "Daredevil."

Tony Hicks writes celebrity commentary for the Bay Area News Group. Contact him at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.TonyHicks or Twitter.com/tonyhicks67

San Jose Mercury News
Today
18 Points
New
1 2 3

Tech Opinion: Apple Watch + Music show intuitive software should be top priority for Apple’s new VP of UI Design

will go a long way towards making major new Apple releases as magical as their predecessors.Opinion: Apple Music & Taylor Swift . Steve Jobs’ Apple was literally defined by the philosophy that it was better for a product to do a few things wonderfully than a lot of things poorly.Apple Music suffers from the same lack of polish as the Apple Watch, except here, the major issue is sprawl. Everywere.. Osx, ios, watch , all softwares .. Etc.. Apple, dont make UI a hide and seek game.. .

Like many other people, I signed up for Apple Music yesterday because it was intriguing and free. Having skipped earlier subscription music services, I didn’t have Spotify playlists to worry about losing or importing, and I hadn’t experienced truly unlimited access to a giant music selection before. Apple Music’s sign-up process turned out to be great: attractive, simple, and just personal enough to learn my tastes without feeling creepy. It’s also likely to win long-term customers: sign up your family, and after 3 months, someone’s going to insist on keeping Apple Music (or just forget to cancel it).

But once the sign-up process is over, Apple Music repeats a mistake that Apple made earlier this year with the Apple Watch: throwing users into the deep end of a big new pool without adequate guidance. Despite all the talk of importantly human-curated content, Apple Music is oddly and robotically silent when it should be actively guiding new customers through a brand new service. In prior years, Apple held back products until they were polished enough that anyone could use them immediately. These days, Apple releases major products with enough rough software edges that customers and reviewers are (rightfully) complaining about learning curves and unintuitive interfaces.

As of today, Apple has a new VP of User Interface Design, Alan Dye, who is taking over software-side responsibilities from Apple’s vaunted design chief Jony Ive. In light of the Apple Watch and Apple Music launches, both of which were criticized for unnecessarily complex user interfaces, I’d respectfully suggest to Mr. Dye that fixing this problem should be a top priority?

Although a handful of people have claimed ? often obnoxiously ? that only idiots will struggle through the first two days of using an Apple Watch, the wearable device was justifiably dinged for clunky initial performance and a sub-par setup process by reviewers and users. Even if you put aside the Home screen’s clutter of tiny, unlabeled circular icons, you still have glances and notifications to sort through, prune down, and figure out. Farhad Manjoo at the New York Times said it best: there’s a big learning curve for the first couple of days with an Apple Watch, then something clicks, and you’ll start to like or love it. It goes without saying that this wasn’t Apple’s style; when asked, I’ve explained to the (many) holdouts I know that the Apple Watch makes a bad first impression, but rapidly becomes something you don’t want to take off despite its obvious limitations. Waiting for a second- or third-generation version is, in my view, as much for improved software as hardware at this point.

It’s tempting to write off the rough first couple of days and focus on how good the experience later becomes, but that’s not the way Apple products are supposed to work. Regardless of whether you characterize the learning curve as “steep” (like Manjoo) or “shallow” (like some others), the very existence of a learning curve is the barrier between mainstream success and failure. It’s also the major historic difference between Apple products and dozens if not hundreds of alternatives. Early adopters are a small group of people who are willing to suffer through rough patches, but the large mass of mainstream users people get frustrated with unpolished products and often won’t come back. That’s why Apple always used to err on the side of shipping fully usable products minus desired features rather than ones that compromised intuitive usability. Steve Jobs’ Apple was literally defined by the philosophy that it was better for a product to do a few things wonderfully than a lot of things poorly.

Apple Music suffers from the same lack of polish as the Apple Watch, except here, the major issue is sprawl. For some reason, pieces of the new service are scattered across four separate tabs. On the iPhone, I was initially dropped into the least important tab, Connect, a timeline of tweet-caliber posts from artists. Beats One, Apple’s new and much-discussed global radio station, is nestled within the Radio tab. A section called “For You” houses personalized (but seemingly not particularly deep) music recommendations. And the one thing I really wanted to see, a catalog-like view of the 30-million-song Apple Music collection I’d signed up for, appeared to be hidden inside a tab called “New.” But if you really want to find individual songs in the catalog, it turns out that the easiest way to do it is? a search. 

Apple Music’s features feel even less conspicuous in iTunes 12.2, which already has so many icons and tabs that the new features just blend in. Unfortunately, they don’t blend in a desirable way. It goes without saying that Apple Music could have just dropped you into the iTunes Store and let you go to town downloading tracks, but instead, Apple built a parallel interface that looks and acts just different enough from the Store to be confusing. For instance, it’s easy to see just how popular an artist’s individual tracks are within the iTunes Store. But in Apple Music, you can’t. A team of people went through the trouble to build this second UI to browse largely identical content, but it barely adds anything. And for some reason, my MacBook Pro’s fans start spinning whenever Apple Music features load.

The iTunes Store shows popularity in a clear way

Apple Music presents the same content in a less useful way

There are a lot of nits to pick with the way Apple integrated Beats Music into iTunes and iOS, but the bigger picture issues are more important. First, someone at Apple was OK adding a bunch of new tabs into iTunes and the Music app without giving customers even a brief first-use explanation of how they worked. Second, no one stopped a minor feature such as Connect ? a retread of a previously highly unpopular feature, Ping ? from getting one full tab within the iOS Music app when the old iOS Music app was getting uncomfortably shoehorned into another tab. And iTunes, an app that has long been criticized for bloat, now has actually gotten to the point where it’s employing two user interfaces to browse largely similar content. Given Apple’s supposed list of “a thousand no’s for every yes,” it’s hard to see how these items wound up in the “yes” column.

Today’s top-level user interface leadership changes at Apple present a fresh opportunity for the company to return to the user-friendly software releases that made it famous. A little extra UI polish ? particularly when thinking about what new users and users of brand new software will be thinking ? will go a long way towards making major new Apple releases as magical as their predecessors.

Opinion: Apple Music & Taylor Swift ? PR nightmare or publicity dream?

Opinion: Will the launch of Apple Music mark the beginning of the end for Spotify?

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Yes .. Yes and Yes? Big time..

Simple and intuitive.

Though i dont think apple music is all that confusing. Its huge.. But its not all that confusing.

But i agree with the emphasis on simple and intuituve ! Everywere.. Osx, ios, watch , all softwares .. Etc..

Apple, dont make UI a hide and seek game.. ?

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I really had trouble already with the new iTunes UI and it’s nonsense logic, but with apple music, I’m lost.

LikeLiked by 2 people

iTunes itself needs a re-design IMHO?there are way too many things that are useful that are hidden, and way too many things that aren’t useful that are front and center. The new iOS music app isn’t that bad though, I kind of like it.

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9to5Mac
Today
18 Points
New
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Money Microsoft Windows 7 Hits 60% Growth, Surpasses Windows 8

On the contrary, Windows 8.1 reported decline of 0.24 percent coming in at 2.90 percent, while Windows 8.1 experienced a meager increase of around 0.24 percent, coming in at 13.12 percent.The Windows 8.0 and Windows 8.1 gained total market share of 16.02 percent as of June 30, decreasing from 16.45 percent since May 2015.

Published: Jul 1, 2015 at 3:30 pm EST

Microsoft Corporation's (NASDAQ:MSFT) Windows 8.1 and Windows 8.0 continue to struggle in the IT market, while its previous version witnesses continuous elevation in the market capitalization. In the last seven months, Windows 7 has experienced an increment of more than 60 percent in its market share.

In addition, Windows 7 has recorded the highest growth rate, compared to any other operating system version by reporting 60.98 percent increase in the market share. On the contrary, Windows 8.1 reported decline of 0.24 percent coming in at 2.90 percent, while Windows 8.1 experienced a meager increase of around 0.24 percent, coming in at 13.12 percent.

The Windows 8.0 and Windows 8.1 gained total market share of 16.02 percent as of June 30, decreasing from 16.45 percent since May 2015. Furthermore, both the versions are yet to record market share of more than 20 percent.

Speculations are rife that Windows 7 will hold the record of being one of the most popular Windows version, surpassing Windows XP in September 2012. While breaking the 50 percent barrier in May 2014, the version is all set to maintain its halfway point.

The increase in market share of Windows 7 has benefited from the decline of Windows Vista's market share of 0.39% to 1.62 percent, while Windows XP decreased by 2.62 percent coming in at 11.98 percent.

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Bidness Etc
Today
18 Points

Women's World Cup: U.S. women head to final after 2-0 win over Germany

Actor and musician Justin Timberlake also cheered on the U.S., tweeting "USA! USA! USA!!!!!" Next up for the U.S. Lloyd's penalty kick in the 69th minute went into the right side of the goal less than 10 minutes after Celia Sasic shot wide on a penalty kick for Germany. Lloyd's penalty kick got the United States on the board, and the Americans went on to a 2-0 victory over top-ranked Germany in the semifinals of the Women's World Cup on Tuesday night.

MONTREAL -- Carli Lloyd remembers putting the ball on its spot and shutting out the noise of more than 51,000 anxious fans.

Then she blasted that ball into the back of the net.

Lloyd's penalty kick got the United States on the board, and the Americans went on to a 2-0 victory over top-ranked Germany in the semifinals of the Women's World Cup on Tuesday night.

"That's exactly what I did, shut out everything around me and focused on what I needed to do," she said.

Lloyd's penalty kick in the 69th minute went into the right side of the goal less than 10 minutes after Celia Sasic shot wide on a penalty kick for Germany. Stanford graduate Kelley O'Hara came in off the bench and scored in the 85th minute, delighting the pro-American crowd.

Hope Solo posted her fifth straight shutout, continuing a dominant run for the American defense. The second-ranked United States has gone 513 minutes without conceding a goal.

The victory captured the attention of President Barack Obama, who posted his congratulations on his Twitter account. Actor and musician Justin Timberlake also cheered on the U.S., tweeting "USA! USA! USA!!!!!"

Next up for the U.S. is the winner of Wednesday night's match in Edmonton between defending champion Japan, ranked No. 4, and sixth-ranked England. Germany will play the loser of the second semifinal in the third-place game in Edmonton on Saturday.

The final is set for Sunday at Vancouver's BC Place.

"We didn't come here just to make the final," Lloyd said. "We came here to win it, so we're going to go after it."

It was the fourth World Cup meeting between Germany and the U.S. In each of the first three games, the winner went on to take the title.

The marquee matchup led to lines of fans waiting to get in about three hours before the game. The line for the main souvenir stand snaked up a half-dozen ramps to the building's third level at one point.

The stadium built for the 1976 Olympics, where the East German men won the gold medal, was filled nearly to its blue fabric roof, mostly with fans cheering for the United States. The crowd was announced at 51,176.

Previous games in Montreal had the stadium less than half full, with the upper bowl completely empty.

The United States had several good chances from the start. Julie Johnston, a Santa Clara University alum, missed on a header off a corner kick from Megan Rapinoe, and former Cal star Alex Morgan's breakaway in the 15th minute was stopped by goaltender Nadine Angerer.

There was a scary moment in the first half when Germany's Alexandra Popp and American midfielder Morgan Brian collided in front of the U.S. goal following a free kick from about 25 yards out.

Television cameras caught blood in Popp's hair, and Brian was prone on the field for several minutes. Both players returned to the match.

Shortly thereafter, Annike Krahn got a yellow card for fouling Morgan in the box, but replays showed it occurred just outside. Lloyd's penalty kick was her third goal in three matches.

"Of course, I'm very, very sad about this, that this penalty shot decided the match," German coach Silvia Neid said. "What am I going to do though? A referee decision is something I have to live with. I am very sad about it, but I cannot change it."

Lloyd is known for coming up big in important games. She scored the winning goal in overtime to beat Brazil for the gold medal in the 2008 Beijing Olympics, and scored both U.S. goals in the final of the 2012 London Olympics against Japan. She is the only player to score the winning goals in consecutive Olympic finals.

In the World Cup quarterfinals, she scored the lone goal in a 1-0 victory over China.

O'Hara scored on Lloyd's left-footed cross.

The United States tweaked its formation for the match. Morgan started up top, with Lloyd as an attacking midfielder with Rapinoe and Tobin Heath on the wings.

WEDNESDAY'S SEMIFINAL*

Japan vs. England,

at Edmonton, Alberta, 4 p.m. FS1

* -- Winner faces U.S. in Sunday's championship match in Vancouver (4 p.m., Fox)

WORLD CUP BLOG

It's time to credit Jill Ellis, the coach who many doubted had the strategic savvy to do what the United States did Tuesday night in Montreal. Read Elliott Almond's Women's World Cup blog at blogs.mercurynews.com/worldcup.

San Jose Mercury News
Today
16 Points
New
1 2

Tech Apple Music diary: Day 1, first impressions

My current iTunes library would be over 35,000 if I included it all. the moment I add a track that I like from that album iTunes stops the playback. On the iOS app, Start Station is above Add to My Music; in iTunes, the order is reversed. This may be a benefit/side-effect of being an iTunes Match subscriber, so can’t comment there. I had both my girls logged in as me prior to 8.4 so they could use our songs in iTunes Match. I really hope Apple iron out these issues.LikeLiked by 1 person“.

I’m not expecting here to replicate my rather extensive Apple Watch diary series ? I doubt this one will run to four pieces. I’m also not starting out here as an Apple Music skeptic. I’ve been using Spotify for years, and ? from a brief trial of Beats Music ? started out pretty confident I would be jumping ship once Apple Music launched.

But I do think Apple Music has one thing in common with the Watch: I don’t think it’s possible to judge it without a reasonable amount of usage. So I thought I’d begin with my first impressions and then follow up once I’ve used it long enough to have more to say.

I’m not going to dwell on the launch-day glitches, like the welcome screen (above) left over from the beta, the rather belated iTunes update, Beats 1 outage, frequent spinning beachballs in iTunes and the tracks that either refused to play at all or took an age to do so. Half the planet was simultaneously using the service yesterday, so these things will only become issues if they persist. So leaving those aside, what were my first impressions ? ? 

Signing-up

Signing-up to Apple Music in the iOS app was entirely painless. Having trialled Beats Music, the opening interface was familiar, and it’s one I think works well. Tap the bubbles you like, double-tap the ones you love, tap-and-hold to ‘burst’ the ones you dislike.

After selecting my genres, I did four rounds of artist selection and de-selection. That done, I eagerly tapped on For You. In my view, this is ? or should be ? the heart of Apple Music. Personalized recommendations for me based not just on algorithms, but on personal selections made by people with a deep knowledge of the music industry. That’s the Apple Music promise.

The first playlist it offered me was Evening Commute: Acoustic, and I was instantly impressed. It was heavy on my favorite genre ? singer-songwriter ? but also mixed in pop and alternative. Of the 16 tracks it offered, I skipped only two ? and those because I found them so-so rather than actively disliking them. That’s a far better hit-rate than any Spotify playlist I’ve tried.

The second thing that impressed me was, of those 16 tracks, I only owned two of them. That has always been the main weakness to me of Spotify’s playlists: they tend to play a lot of music I already own. Artist radio, in particular, is very heavily biased toward the artist themselves, rather than other artists you might like. Sometimes, Spotify had just felt like a slightly lazier way to listen to my own music. Apple Music, in contrast, was doing what I see as the core job of a streaming music service: introducing me to new music.

From those 16 tracks, I liked two of them enough to add them to My Music. Apple Music was off to a great start.

Yes, I do have dodgy musical tastes, let’s move along ?

Unfortunately, things went fairly rapidly downhill from there. It initially offered me only one other playlist, and that one was far less successful. Nothing I actually hated, but nothing I loved or even particularly liked. It was really nothing more than inoffensive background listening. A third playlist popped up later, and that one I mostly disliked.

In addition to the three playlists, it initially offered me six albums. I already owned three of them. It later expanded these to twelve albums; I owned nine of them. Nine out of twelve. Nine albums sitting in my iTunes library. Where’s the supposed integration between my music library and the streaming service? Why is a music discovery service showing me music I discovered for myself years ago?

Now, I guess you could argue that it would be legitimate to surface albums I owned but haven’t played for ages, but nope: two were albums I play often. Again, iTunes has access to play counts, so this is hardly the seamless marriage of owned and streamed music I’d hoped for. The only good news here is the other three albums were ones I don’t yet own by artists I have in my library; that’s legitimate and useful.

By the following morning, Apple Music was offering me three Intro To selections. Intro To is a great concept: show me an artist I don’t know, and give me a hand-curated selections representing a good cross-section of tracks by that artist. Fantastic. Except ? all three artists it was ‘introducing’ to me were, yep, you guessed it: artists already in my music library!

Now, I know this is day 2. It needs to learn my tastes. But the whole point of integrating owned and non-owned music into a single app is, surely, to use one to generate suggestions for the other? Offering me albums I already own is silly, and Intro To artists I already own is absolutely crazy. 

The user interface in both apps is, I would say, a little clunky. In the iOS app, if you really love a track, the chances are you’re going to want to do three things:

Those are three separate actions in the app (only two of which can be done from the Now Playing screen, as far as I can see). Now, I’m hoping/assuming the app is smart enough to realize that if you make it available offline or add it to My Music, that’s because you like it ? and that either action is treated as a Like ? but even if I’m right, it’s still two actions.

The iTunes ‘?’ menu gives you the choice of New Station from Artist and New Station from Song; the iOS app just gives you Start Station. Again, it doesn’t give much of an integrated feel. And the menus also order things differently. On the iOS app, Start Station is above Add to My Music; in iTunes, the order is reversed. A small point, but Apple is all about attention to detail, and it’s lacking here.

There’s also no obvious way for me to tell Apple Music that I dislike a track. With Beats, you could give a thumbs-down as well as a thumbs-up. Apple/Beats clearly recognizes from the setup stage that what we dislike is as important as what we like, but once past setup I can see no way in either app to give a thumbs-down to a track ? there’s only a heart option to like it.

The latter point seems to me more than a UI complaint: it would also reduce the effectiveness of Apple Music’s ability to learn my tastes.

Here’s where I’m going to sound like my dad. I’m not a fan of DJs as a concept; I just want the music. By all means hire DJs to create the playlists, but I won’t want them talking between tracks ? and talking over tracks ought to be a felony.

My musical tastes are far from cool, so I sampled Beats 1 without expecting much, and I wasn’t disappointed. This isn’t a criticism: I’m just not the target market.

Conclusions so far

I have to confess, I’m disappointed. From my brief trial of Beats, I’d been expecting great things of Apple Music ? and so far it hasn’t delivered. The UI stuff isn’t a big deal, it just feels messy; not learning from the music I already own is the big disappointment.

But I do fully acknowledge that it’s unfair to judge the service on day two: I need to give it a decent shot at learning my tastes, so I’m going to religiously Like every track it plays that I do like, and see how it does over the next week or three. Watch this space.

What are your own first impressions? Take our poll, and let us know your views in the comments.

The reviews are in: Apple Music is ‘deep, overwhelming, exciting?’

Opinion: Will the launch of Apple Music mark the beginning of the end for Spotify?

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What is the reason you can’t use airplay when listening to Beats One via iTunes?

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I don’t know, that is strange.

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The “Share Song” option is EMBARRASSING! It’s just posts a horribly pixelated pic of the album art with a link and no other info? no song/album title, no artist name.

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I had to write in everything else? besides the link, but this is what it looks like: https://twitter.com/Nardes/status/615978690783129600

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Great Story Ben, Thanks! When will we get a picture of you without your hand in front of your face?

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I don’t think ever. Somehow he writes in a way that never result in a facepalm¡

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Heh, I thought I’d updated that a while back, but apparently not. Will do it tomorrow ?

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Can someone please help me.. Apple music is taking up to much memory on my iPhone, every time I add a song to my playlist it’s like I’m downloading it to my phone, with spotify I’m able to have 800 songs on my playlist and it doesn’t take up to much memory? I’m I doing something wrong?

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Definitely some bug or something. Ive noticed that when I play a track and add it to my music, even though I dont choose offline it seems like it gets added to my song total under settings. If this is the case then its a problem. Cause in time its gonna take up a lot of space.

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1) That’s an excellent article. Not just because I agree with your sentiment, and points, but you explain the why part. Many times journalists fail to elaborate on that.

2) I’ve only listened to their radio station, so I cannot comment the ‘matching part’ of their algorithm. Or lack therefor, so it seems.

3) What was Ida Marie doing in your screen dump¿

3) Liked this one: “Here’s where I’m going to sound like my dad”

4) Yes, I will be watching this space, though I already am.

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I’m the opposite ? I haven’t listened to any of the radio stations beyond Beats 1, but will be doing this.

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Similar experiences here, both via iOS and the Desktop iTunes which I’ve been using more. A good way to check what music I like would be to scan what songs are already in my library plus how often they’re played. With the initial bubble on iOS I was unable to do very much because the UI is somewhat broken on a 3.5? screen ? I attribute this to zero testing. Double tapping a bubble makes it too big to move around which makes it impossible to click on off-screen bubbles. It’s an infuriating and cumbersome UI that should be replaced with a LIST as soon as possible. There should also be an option to revisit this UI to tune it up.

While you can specify two levels of “like” during the initial discovery, later on you can only “heart/love” a track (not an artist) which seems a little ill-thought for the same purpose. There’s also no way later to say “this sucks, I hate it” to anything. A music preference system needs to support a “loathe” feature or it will always be incomplete ? negatives are just as important as positives. I used a people-powered system back in the very early 90’s, before the web, called ROMEO, which was pretty damned cool.

When floating music I already have, at the very least, don’t promote the ability to download to my library when it already exists there.

Another huge complaint, but about iTunes in general is that the presentation of artists doesn’t seem to use a unique artist ID, such that you will often (always) have multiple artists with the same name polluting each other’s artist pages. This is really inexcusable.

LikeLiked by 2 people

I was elated in the first few hours, now my playlists and artists are messed with duplicates, the meta data is so totally screwed that I may revert to a backup and try Apple Music in a couple of month’s time

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I do like the layout. I hate a can not simply gather some song into a playlist for the gym for example and then enjoy it on my ipad with my beat solo 2 wireless? With spotify I can arrange some songs I like on my mac book, then I am pretty confident I get somewhere open my ipad and run the app, those song added will be updated? the icloud thing on the music playlist sharing is the problem?

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Why not? You can. Just make sure iCloud Music Library is enabled in settings. That will keep your playlists in sync.

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So I turned iCloud Music Library manually on iTunes on the desktop and it fails after the scan and during a genius faze. Next.

On iPhone you can turn it on manually or it will turn on automatically when you add music to “My Music” from the cloud or “Make Available Offline” ? which seems like the exact same thing.

After doing this on the iPhone I was able to pull an entire album onto the phone for offline play, BUT, here’s the kicker, it deleted about 1/4 of all the music on my iPhone without the ability to get it back. The songs aren’t listed under their albums on the phone. On iTunes they show up as greyed out.

Trying to copy music manually to the iPhone after enabling iCloud Music Library doesn’t work ? it always pops up pan error that “some” of the music can’t be copied because iCloud is enabled. Synching the phone doesn’t put the disabled tracks back.

Turning off iCloud Music Library and then disconnecting and reconnecting the phone allows a sync which promptly restored all the missing tracks by copying them from my library.

This feature is a non-starter.

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The whole thing is very messy. in iTunes I can’t add track from Apple Music to playlist without adding it first to My Music. WHen I try to edit playlist, everything but My Music is greyed out. So odd. Overall doing things seems very different between iOS and Mac. Spotify had this working very well.

Syncing playlists between devices (iCloud Music Library) takes LONG time. I also don’t get why is it disabled by default.

I love the playlists thought, they’re really good and often spot-on. But I feel there’s a lot of work to experience of this service.

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I forgot to add, in the “For You” tab, on average, 9 out of 10 recommended artists or albums already exist in my Library ? sometimes 100% overlap. And this is via iTunes, so the app can definitely access all my music ? it simply doesn’t factor your library whatsoever.

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I also can’t find any way to listen to anything I don’t already have OFFLINE without turning on iCloud Music ? which by all account will really screw things up in my library if other reports are accurate.

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Not sure if this answers your question or not but if you touch on the word “Artists” in the my music tab it being up a way to sort them to show only offline music.

I didn’t have any music on my phone before (it was all through Spotify) so I’m not sure if it shows offline without iCloud library enabled.

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Putting local and streamed music into a single app and then not factoring in the local music is a massive fail if what we’re both experiencing is design rather than launch glitch.

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Is a ‘felony’ a ‘crime’?

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More specifically, a serious one.

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With regards to the “Intro to?” comment, it’s a fair point, though not all the music I have in my library I am particularly familiar with, so a formal introduction can help ? though really there should be the option for this on the artist page (similar to the radio function).

My view of the For You tab including owned music is that it is suggesting albums that you like or will like, not necessarily that you don’t own. Admittedly this is confusing though, as it means that section of Apple Music is not exclusively for music discovery.

All-in-all, from my first day’s experience with Apple Music, I’ve gotta say I’m impressed by the integration with my music and the interface is far speedier and effective than Spotify’s and even Deezer’s. Julie Adenuga’s show this morning was a pleasure to listen to, also. A MAJOR boon is the ability to easily add and remove songs, artists and albums from the up next queue ? this is something I have felt to be lacking in every streaming service I have used.

Minor niggles are: bugs which cause dodgy search results and app crashes, and a drawn-out process for building playlists from the service’s expanded library. Also, there are many tracks not present which are present on Spotify.

I’m putting the niggles down to the fact the service is a day old, and am hopeful for the future. What I know is that I have cancelled Spotify.

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Also, Apple have somehow managed to make iTunes even more bloated and even more confusing. When will the torture end?

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I voted OK. Nothing to hashtag about, yet, but my two issues are:

1. I added a few tracks to My Music seamlessly. Those tracks even appeared for me on my iPhone 6 running the iOS 9 beta (I am using our old iPhone 4S as an iPod these days, and is where I subscribed to Apple Music). Thought this was great. This may be a benefit/side-effect of being an iTunes Match subscriber, so can’t comment there. Then I went into iTunes on my Macs. Updated to 12.2. Grey squares with text data and greyed out songs that were not playable. No artwork. Even this morning, same thing. So I just deleted them for now.

?- Related note. I didn’t realize I had a couple albums. Some of the U2 earlier albums that they reissued as Deluxe about 2008. So I added them. Then I looked in My Music and I had one album, with each song twice. These were iTunes purchases, so I feel your pain/concern there.

2. Family Sharing/Children Accounts. This was what I was most excited about. I had both my girls logged in as me prior to 8.4 so they could use our songs in iTunes Match. I changed this yesterday after the updates. All good. Set them up in Apple Music, created there own accounts (using the Family Sharing Apple IDs I created for them last year). All works fine. They can find a song or album and play it, no issues. They can make tracks available offline, again, no issue. But when they just want to tap “Add to My Music” ? they can, they get the animated checkmark overlay. But the songs never go over to the “My Music” section. I hope this bug gets fixed.

Overall, the service is good. The price is right for my two girls, and I get the benefit, too. I am planning to stay subscribed at this point, but won’t cancel iTunes Match just yet, but will likely not renew it come October?

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When I play a song on my iPhone with my Apple Watch on there is the heart icon. With the Watch being quick interactions?e.g. driving?it annoys me that when you click the heart it brings up 3 choices: like it, add it to my music, dislike it. Plus I would have never thought that clicking the heart would let me dislike it. But when you brought up the lack of a dislike button I realized that there totally isn’t one outside the Watch. Strange. I would like the heart on the watch to just heart it and let me move on with my day; if I want I’ll add it to my music later.

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Just tried that ? you’re right, that’s completely the wrong way around, offering more choice on the Watch than the phone. I tried long-pressing the heart on the phone just in case I’d missed a feature, but nothing.

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Put me in the “ok” vote camp. As of right now I prefer Spotifys app by a lot and factor in Spotify will still work nicely on a free tier when I want a break from paying and I have no reason to switch.

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It’s okay. Not as good as Spotify ? it’s a messy, buggy app. Connect is a disaster with no actual social features, it’s not integrated into your existing library at all it seems and honestly, these human-made stations simply aren’t very good and are certainly worse than an algorithm in my experience.

Definitely won’t be switching.

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I have been acquiring albums on vinyl and CD for 35 years. My current iTunes library would be over 35,000 if I included it all. As it is is almost 29,000 items so Music is pretty much useless to me if I want to use it like Spotify as I can’t turn on Music Match thing till the limit is raised from 25,000 items. Those with big pre existing libraries are locked out ? I do not want to have to ‘prune’ 4,000 tunes from my music library. Doh.

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My irritation goes as follows?

“Hey Siri, play Burn by Ellie Goulding”

“OK, let’s hear some Ellie Goulding”

?Spice Girls starts playing? WTF!!

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Is anyone else having issues with saving music for offline playback? I’ve tried adding both individual tracks and entire albums for offline playback (as well as adding them to “My Music”), but when I search “My Music”, the tracks do not appear. Am I missing something?

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Really surprised that as little that I used it I found so many issues. Blank response boxes that are obviously bugs and go take a look at the picture for Billy idol??um that’s Billy Joel really apple I expect a lot better.

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To me the best thing about Apple Music is the seamless integration with my iTunes library. As a old-fashioned music fanatic, I have a huge library filled with CD-rips or even high resolution music files, and have never ever used any music streaming services before (tried Tidal and Spotify for only a month or two). Any streaming services before Apple Music to me were mere unnecessary addition to my music library, and I would solely use them to audit a new album before I find it good and buy the CD from Amazon. Apple Music has made the line between my personal music foundation and the ocean of music out there on the cloud very very vague, and that alone ensures that I like it and would (still) not consider any other streaming services. This is the first streaming service that feels right for someone such as myself.

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Hold a album or a playlist in FOR YOU and you have the option to say ”Recomment Fewer Like This”. I think that act as the DISLIKE button you couldn’t find

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Ah, interesting. That isn’t there at a track level, but works for both albums and playlists ? thanks!

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Wish the desktop interface had this feature. It seems that adding right-click options on the desktop version could mimic the press and held gestures on our iOS devices.

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Hi. I didn´t like the UI. It doesn´t have option to swipe left and right to change track. Information of hour and battery show up over the album picture, what is very strange to me. I prefer the player of spotify. Besides, after close de app, my iphone 6 stay slow for 3 seconds. After this time, it works normaly.

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You can tell Apple Music if you don’t like certain things?. Well, you can press and hold on a playlist in “For you’ and you get the option to “recommend less like this’ and therefore it learns you want to see less of that person or style of music.

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Thank you, a great article that sums up most of my experience with AM so far. I am discovering some new music, so that’s good. My biggest problem at the moment in the discovery process is the incredibly clumsy way of diving deeper in to an artist/album from a radio stream.

Example: I’m listening to a House radio station, I hear a song I like. All I can do is add it to my music, I can’t go directly to the album an start listening to all the other songs. Well, I can, but on the iTunes store. And that doesn’t allow me to add the music to my library, only purchase, so it’s pointless. So the process continues like this ? I add the track to my music, then click on it in my music to start playback, at that point I can go to the full album, show all the other tracks and listen to them. But even there the problems continue ? the moment I add a track that I like from that album iTunes stops the playback. So I have to restart it. It shouldn’t be happening. Also I’ve noticed that if I heart the song before I add it iTunes/AM looses the heart once I add it to my music, so I have to heart it again (or only after adding it). Not what I was expecting. I really hope Apple iron out these issues.

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“. . . and talking over tracks ought to be a felony.”

THAT.

As a musician/composer myself I like to listen to how the song evolves from the opening material. There’s a DJ talking over the material. An effective piece often ends as it begins, there’s a DJ talking over the material. And throughout the piece the introductory material should be developed, there’s a DJ talking over the material in the middle.

So I guess this is good, theme and variation on the beginning of the piece, developing the F’ing DJ. I just don’t think that’s what the artist intended.

If only there was ample time for the DJ to talk between the music selections; oh wait, there is.

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9to5Mac
Today
16 Points
New
1

Money Greeks eke by on little cash

"It's much more difficult."Greece's banks closed this week as the country negotiates debt payments with the rest of Europe. A refusal to accept the deal might lead to Greece's exit from the eurozone.Greeks have suffered pension and benefit cuts, and tax increases since the Greek economy collapsed in 2009. "I fear for the future of my child."Greece's finance ministry announced that about 1,000 bank branches of five banks will be open Wednesday for three days to allow limited withdrawals.

ATHENS ? At Taverna Plaka restaurant, waiter Gamal Takaway stands among rows of tables left empty because of government limits on cash withdrawals this week as Greece hunkers down during a financial crisis.

Near the Acropolis, cash that is limited for Greeks but plentiful for foreign travelers created two tiers of customers -- those who can stop at Elaea Cafe for coffee and sweets and those who can't. "There is a lot of anxiety," said owner Yannis Iliopoulos.

And fishmonger Spyros Corakkis said selling the day's catch from the shimmering Aegean Sea is much tougher at hotels and restaurants on a cash-only basis without invoices.

"It's a big problem when the banks are closed," Corakkis said. "It's much more difficult."

Greece's banks closed this week as the country negotiates debt payments with the rest of Europe. One miserly result is a withdrawal limit of 60 euros per day or about $67. Tens of thousands of retirees who were scheduled to receive pensions Monday hadn't had money credited to their accounts. Some money trickled in Tuesday afternoon, according to Greek media reports.

"I fear for what will happen tomorrow," said Anastasia Polixroniadi, 39, who was withdrawing money Tuesday from an ATM to stockpile diapers for her family. "I fear for the future of my child."

Greece's finance ministry announced that about 1,000 bank branches of five banks will be open Wednesday for three days to allow limited withdrawals. But workers at one of the five banks, the National Bank of Greece, have asked for police protection.

"The conditions that have developed make an essential requirement, for the operation of the branches, for there to be sufficient police presence," the bank's employees' association said in a statement.

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras called a referendum for Sunday on whether to accept the new austerity measures that are a condition of the latest bailout deal. A refusal to accept the deal might lead to Greece's exit from the eurozone.

Greeks have suffered pension and benefit cuts, and tax increases since the Greek economy collapsed in 2009.

?"It's time to rebel," said Maria Anagnostou, 27, of Athens. "The power is in our hands."

Protests have swept the country.

Police estimated up to 12,000 people gathered Tuesday outside Parliament in Syntagma Square to demonstrate in favor of a "yes" vote in Sunday's referendum, to accept budget savings that creditors have demanded in exchange for loans.

"We're staying in Europe," people chanted as a thunderstorm drenched them.

The protest came a day after 13,000 government supporters rallied for a "no" vote.

The financial chaos spawned widespread uncertainty. Kleanthis Tsironis says he'll lay off 10 of his 27 workers at his butcher shop if sales continue to plummet.

"The people are buying with cash, not credit cards, and the problem is the customers don't have cash," said Tsironis, 65, who founded his business decades earlier. "I'm very afraid that I will go to prison for debts."

Panayotis Arguropoulos, 45, an English tutor, said the situation is tragic no matter what happens. His lessons have been canceled since the bank limits were imposed this week because his clients pay in cash.

"Who will pay the workers?" he asked. "How will we buy milk, medicines for our children? How will we raise them?"

Contributing: Bart Jansen in Washington and The Associated Press

USA Today
Today
15 Points
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Money Microsoft Corporation Releases Skype For Business Beta Preview

Users, who wish to test the new business tools’ effectiveness, must possess Office 365 Enterprise plan or Skype for Business Plan 2.The PSTN Conferencing feature is now available in the US, and allows users to join conferences via phones or landline devices. They can add members to the Office 365 Skype suit, by dialing “out” on their numbers, and adding them to the existing Skype call.

Published: Jul 1, 2015 at 3:22 pm EST

Today, Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) mentioned it plans to launch several new features on Skype for Business later this year, and previewed three separate versions for the beta update.

With the Skype update, the company aims to contribute to a more high-tech way to conduct large-scale conferences and meetings, as part of its cloud-based Office 365 suite of productivity software.

The tech giant unveiled Skype for Business back in April 2015, and replaced its Lync services with the latest Skype beta features. With the newest tier of popular chatting service, Microsoft intends to incorporate office settings into its web-inspired cloud-messaging service, by allowing users to conduct meetings, phone calls, and conferences, without any worries of Internet, cables, etc.

In an official statement, Microsoft stated: “The Office 365 Skype for Business voice and video services are based on an intelligent real-time network, spanning Microsoft’s global data centers, to deliver secure, high quality voice and video traffic at the speed of light across the globe.”

Today, Microsoft revealed the initial test version of three new Skype services for business users: Skype Meeting Broadcast, Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Conferencing, and Cloud PBX with PSTN Calling. Users, who wish to test the new business tools’ effectiveness, must possess Office 365 Enterprise plan or Skype for Business Plan 2.

The PSTN Conferencing feature is now available in the US, and allows users to join conferences via phones or landline devices. They can add members to the Office 365 Skype suit, by dialing “out” on their numbers, and adding them to the existing Skype call. With this venture, Microsoft eliminated users’ dependency on desktop devices, Internet connection, and other websites.

Similarly, the company’s Cloud PBX with PSTN Calling is also only available in the US, with plans to expand the services by Fall 2015. With this feature, businessmen can manage their call logs and phone calls through the forward, pause, hold, and transfer options. The feature’s preview is accessible through Azure cloud software, and makes use of “voice technology,” according to a Zdnet report.

Skype for Business plan also includes a Meeting Broadcast feature, which allows users to broadcast conference calls to 10,000 people over the Internet, and allows participants to access the call through their web browsers, without any additional plugins.

According to the Skype Business’s product marketing director, BJ Haberkorn, the former system to allow 250 members in group meetings has evolved into the Broadcast update. Mr. Haberkorn explained: "The 10,000 [users] number is our first release target, where we're going to aim all of our testing to ensure that we're really delivering at enterprise grade."

Whilst the Cloud PBX and PSTN feature is still limited to the US, the Broadcast Business conference tool is available globally for interested businessmen. With Office 35 subscription available to test Skype’s new features, the online communication platform has greatly diversified its service to help benefit large companies with their communication and conference requirements.

Microsoft has not disclosed the pricing options for Skype for Business tools yet. The company stated that it will announce pricing options, once the product is near its full public launch.

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Bidness Etc
Today
16 Points
1

Sports Goran Dragic agrees to 5-year contract with Heat

Free-agent guard Goran Dragic reached a five-year, $90 million deal to stay with the Miami Heat, a person with direct knowledge of the deal told USA TODAY Sports.The person requested anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly until Dragic officially signed.The Heat continue to keep there intregal players (Luol Deng opted in earlier this week) and now the Heat will focus on re-signing Dwyane Wade to a multi-year deal.

Free-agent guard Goran Dragic reached a five-year, $90 million deal to stay with the Miami Heat, a person with direct knowledge of the deal told USA TODAY Sports.

The person requested anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly until Dragic officially signed.

The Heat continue to keep there intregal players (Luol Deng opted in earlier this week) and now the Heat will focus on re-signing Dwyane Wade to a multi-year deal.

USA Today
Today
13 Points
1 2

Sports Yoko Gushiken at last happy as boxer after Hall of Fame induction

no cars, no clothes, no food, he said."We would get sneakers, maybe once a year. That was it," Gushiken said in an interview this week at his gym, dotted with colorful gloves, dangling sandbags, and a poster of Oscar De La Hoya.A fledgling boxer was wrapping his tiny hands by a humble ring.For years, the island had TV reception only for the single public broadcaster. When he traveled to high school tournaments on the main islands, he had to bring a passport.

TOKYO ? It was a long fight for Yoko Gushiken to find life after boxing. Or rather, to find his life was all about boxing, after all.

It took his induction last month into the International Boxing Hall of Fame ? an honor only two other Japanese have received ? to allow him to reconcile with who he truly is.

Three decades after retiring from the ring - often feeling lost and depressed - and after a secondary career as a TV comedian, the former WBA light flyweight champion now accepts his status as a boxing great.

"I saw how splendid boxing was in this world," said the 60-year-old Gushiken, often clenching his fists to emphasize his points.

He appeared a little embarrassed when asked about his TV appearances, particularly on quiz shows, in which he portrays a disarming error-prone character, a gimmick designed to draw laughter from the audience.

Many younger Japanese know him only as a TV personality, oblivious to Gushiken's boxing legacy: He defended his belt 13 times, still a record for a Japanese fighter.

He never had it easy, from the beginning.

He grew up on Okinawa, the southern islands occupied by the U.S. after World War II until 1972. When he traveled to high school tournaments on the main islands, he had to bring a passport. But his pride in his Okinawan roots and his determination to fight for his people drove him.

He grew up on Ishigaki, one of the farthest islands, where "we didn't have anything" ? no cars, no clothes, no food, he said.

"We would get sneakers, maybe once a year. That was it," Gushiken said in an interview this week at his gym, dotted with colorful gloves, dangling sandbags, and a poster of Oscar De La Hoya.

A fledgling boxer was wrapping his tiny hands by a humble ring.

For years, the island had TV reception only for the single public broadcaster. His hometown couldn't even watch his fights.

Even after turning professional, he was so short on money he worked at a pork-cutlet restaurant while he defended his title five times. Gushiken is still grateful to the restaurant owner for giving him that job.

Shinkichi Kinjo, 70, Gushiken's high school boxing coach, said he knew right away from the fiery way Gushiken looked at him that he was special. But he had hopes for sending him to college and maybe the Olympics, and was disappointed when Gushiken turned pro, without going to college.

"But he told me he would make up for it by becoming a champion," Kinjo said proudly, in a telephone interview from Okinawa.

Gushiken reigned as champion for nearly five years, recording eight knockouts, until he was defeated in a 1981 bout, sadly, on Okinawa, where he remains a hero.

"Gushiken was a pressure fighter," said Ted Sares, a boxing fan and writer, who long pushed for Gushiken's induction into the Hall of Fame, insisting Asian fighters were under-represented. "By employing constant pressure, he forced opponents into mistakes."

Back then, title fights went for 15 rounds, although fortunately he knocked out almost every opponent, and rarely had to go the distance. The refs didn't stop fights quickly, and he fought four times a year.

Younger boxers have technique, Gushiken acknowledged, but many lack what's most important in the making of a champion.

"They aren't hungry," he said in his soft voice. "It's all about what's in your heart."

A slight but sprightly man who sports curly hair, Gushiken made it clear he works as a "tarento," or "talent," as Japanese call actors and comics, to spread the word about boxing.

He also needs the TV appearances to raise funds for his Tokyo boxing gym, which he has run for 20 years, to get his boxers fights that may lead to his dream to produce a world champion.

But Gushiken did little to draw attention to his Hall of Fame induction in Canastota, New York, on June 14, including from the Japanese TV shows he frequents. He went quietly, flying at his own expense, booking his own hotel.

And so he was stunned when he was thronged by American fans, who somehow found out where he was staying, and were waiting in the lobby to get his autograph - not on pieces of paper, but on boxing gloves, his photos, and even a pamphlet from one of his fights.

When he went on a victory parade down the streets, he heard someone yell, "Yoko," he recalled, tears brimming a little.

"I connected with all the boxing champions from around the world," he said of the four-day festivities. "We became one."

He dined at a table with two of his biggest heroes, Ruben Olivares and Pipino Cuevas. He was impressed by the fun personality of fellow inductee Riddick Bowe.

And he wasn't a bit nervous when he made his speech, saying in English: "I will never forget this wonderful day."

It was so much fun, he would move to the U.S. this minute, if only he could speak English a little better.

"All my suffering in my boxing life, all of it, suddenly turned into joy," Gushiken said, as though still in a dream. "It was all good."

Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at twitter.com/yurikageyama

The Denver Post
Today
11 Points
1

Tech JetBlue opens outdoor rooftop lounge, with dog walk, at NYC's JFK Airport

The free Wi-Fi in the terminal is also available on the rooftop, as are several food and beverage carts/kiosks, including Blue Marble ice cream and Hebrew National hot dogs."We are New York's Hometown Airline, so T5 was designed to show off the pride we have for our city," Rich Smyth, JetBlue's VP - corporate real estate, says in a statement.

This post will be updated by 1 p.m. ET; check back for first-hand accounts from New York JFK.

In a modern-day nod to the golden age of air travel, JetBlue will open an outdoor lounge on top of Terminal 5 (T5) at New York's JFK International Airport on Wednesday.

Both family and pet-friendly, the 4,046 square-foot T5 Rooftop is open to all passengers who have passed through security, regardless of their status with the airline.

Amenities include landscaped green spaces, seating for 50 people and a 400 square-foot children's play area. As a treat for those traveling with pets, there's also the first airside (post-security) dog walk area on a rooftop.

In addition to fresh air, JetBlue's new rooftop lounge also offers passengers views of the Manhattan skyline and of Eero Saarinen's TWA terminal, an icon in modern architecture that sits adjacent to T5. The free Wi-Fi in the terminal is also available on the rooftop, as are several food and beverage carts/kiosks, including Blue Marble ice cream and Hebrew National hot dogs.

"We are New York's Hometown Airline, so T5 was designed to show off the pride we have for our city," Rich Smyth, JetBlue's VP - corporate real estate, says in a statement. "As rooftops and summer fun go hand in hand in New York, we wanted to bring this unique feature to customers."

The T5 rooftop has a wood deck, turfed spaces, aluminum furniture and native plantings and was designed by Gensler, the architecture firm that created T5 building (opened in 2008) and its international extension (T5i) that opened in November 2014.

"The roof park is yet another way to surprise JetBlue customers with fun experiences that you don't usually have at an airport," said Gensler architect and Principal Ty Osbaugh. "What you see today is the first phase of the rooftop; JetBlue has an eye to future expansion, based on how heavily customers use the new amenity."

While more popular at international airports, security concerns and competition for real estate in terminals have made outdoor lounges and/or observation decks a rare amenity at U.S. airports. Delta Sky Clubs at JFK and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport have outdoor terraces (called Sky Decks) as does the Star Alliance lounge in the Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX, but access to those spaces is restricted to those with memberships, certain credit cards or paid day passes.

Harriet Baskas is a Seattle-based airports and aviation writer and USA TODAY Travel's "At the Airport" columnist. She occasionally contributes to Ben Mutzabaugh's Today in the Sky blog. Follow her at twitter.com/hbaskas.

USA Today
Today
13 Points

Billionaire Saudi prince vows to donate $32 billion fortune

The Saudi prince said in a statement that he will donate $32 billion to his organization called Alwaleed Philanthropies to work in the fields of "intercultural understanding" and supporting communities in need. DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Saudi Arabia's billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, one of the world's richest people, has announced he will donate all of his wealth to charity over the coming years.

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Saudi Arabia's billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, one of the world's richest people, has announced he will donate all of his wealth to charity over the coming years.

The Saudi prince said in a statement that he will donate $32 billion to his organization called Alwaleed Philanthropies to work in the fields of "intercultural understanding" and supporting communities in need. Programs will include promoting health, eradicating disease, bringing electricity to remote villages, building orphanages and schools, as well as "empowering women."

The prince, who is chairman of investment firm Kingdom Holding Company, says he has already donated $3.5 billion to the charitable organization.

Alwaleed joins other billionaires who have made similar pledges in recent years, such as Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Michael Bloomberg.

AP-WF-07-01-15 1442GMT

San Jose Mercury News
Today
14 Points
New
1

Tech iPhone 6S to double LTE speeds, run more efficiently with new Qualcomm chip

We are also told that the new iPhone’s motherboard is slightly narrower and more compact overall than the iPhone 6’s and iPhone 6 Plus’s motherboard, which could mean extra room for a modestly larger battery. chip found inside of the current iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, capable of delivering up to twice the theoretical LTE download speeds. The new MDM9635M chip was first introduced by Qualcomm in late 2013, nearly two years after the chip inside the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus was first announced.

One of the main upgrades to the next iPhone’s internals will be a redesigned wireless system featuring a new Qualcomm-made LTE chip, as revealed by images of a prototype iPhone 6S logic board shared by a source. As shown in the image below, the new device will include Qualcomm’s MDM9635M chip, also known as the ‘9X35? Gobi modem platform. This new chip promises significant performance improvements over the “9X25? chip found inside of the current iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, capable of delivering up to twice the theoretical LTE download speeds?

The new MDM9635M chip was first introduced by Qualcomm in late 2013, nearly two years after the chip inside the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus was first announced. However, due to standard production lag times, the chip only hit the smartphone market one year ago, as the modem inside a South Korean variant on Samsung’s Galaxy S5. For end users, the most important new feature from the chip will be the potential for up to 300 Mbps download speeds, doubling the 150 Mbps download speeds found in the current generation iPhone lineup. The new chip has the same 50 Mbps upload speed limit, however, and real-world performance is likely to be closer to 225Mbps or lower, depending on the cellular network.

The newer processor also is more power efficient, according to Qualcomm, which could mean improved battery life when the iPhone 6S is used for LTE functionality. We are also told that the new iPhone’s motherboard is slightly narrower and more compact overall than the iPhone 6’s and iPhone 6 Plus’s motherboard, which could mean extra room for a modestly larger battery. Combined with iOS 9’s new power-saving features and low-power mode, it would make sense for Apple to also improve battery life by way of upgraded hardware.

Qualcomm’s new chip saves Apple some motherboard space due to its slightly more compact size. The “9X35? is built using a newer 20nm production process, more condensed than the 28nm process used for the Qualcomm cellular data chip in the current iPhones. The “9X35? new chip is Qualcomm’s first built with the new production process, which leads to power efficiency and reduced heat generation. This new chip could prevent iPhones from warming up when under intense data usage.

An upgrade over the “Category 4? chipset in the current iPhone, the new chip is in the category of “Category 6? cellular modems due to its speed. “The Category 6 speeds enabled by the Gobi 9×35 will allow customers to enjoy blazing-fast downloads, snappier application performance due to lower network response time, and run more connectivity based applications smoothly, as well as concurrently,” Qualcomm said when discussing the new chip.

It is still “backwards compatible and supports all other major cellular technologies, including DC-HSPA, EVDO Rev. B, CDMA 1x, GSM and TD-SCDMA,” Qualcomm later added. The chip maker also said that the chip enables smartphone makers to “design sleeker devices without sacrificing performance, while at the same time allowing operators to increase their network capacity and efficiency,” which could open up the door for slimmer iPhones in the future.

However, it does not appear that a slimmer iPhone is ready for 2015, as our earlier images indicated no easily discernible external design differences between the upcoming iPhone and the current iPhone line. In addition to more robust wireless networking and potentially improved battery life, we were told in May that the new iPhone will include a Force Touch display akin to that on the Apple Watch. We’re still tracking additional iPhone 6S details this week, so stay tuned.

Revealed: iPhone 6S will look nearly identical outside, but expect numerous changes inside [Gallery]

iPhone rumor roundup: Asian sources claim we’ll see thinner phones, more powerful chips & bigger cameras

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IMO Apple will really need to bump that battery if they want Apple Music to stay in the Green. I used it to stream Beats1 this morning for about 20minutes while getting ready and my battery drained almost 10% while using wifi.

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Imagine being me and listening to Music all morning? beaming the audio wirelessly to a bluetooth speaker. At 4PM I had to come to terms that I would have to make it through the rest of the day on 10% of battery. Which basically meant no music going home. I got home and plugged in at 1% power.

Maybe Apple Music 1.1 can have a Radio Quality toggle to conserve bandwidth and power.

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Low Power modealso might make a difference in IOS 9

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Well that’s cool. Maybe the reduced battery drain would make a 4? model possible after all.

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We can dream? I don’t think there’s a new 4? in the cards for those of us who want one back?

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Ultimate dream is a 4? device with reduced hight. Like knock off a 1/4 inch from the top and bottom bezel would be an amazing sized phone.

I keep imagining it as a whole new line. Maybe they do something drastic like drop headphone jack to make room. ugh. would be so cool.

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I’d like to see a 5? model. The 6 was nice, but not enough and the 6+ was just too big. 5? is the perfect size for a cell phone IMHO.

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Any word about what bluetooth chip it’ll be sporting? I’m dying to know if they’ll have BLE 4.2 capable chips out this year.

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I feel like their Bluetooth stack would need to be updated to 4.1 first before they worry about 4.2.

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Why do you say that? I think they will just skip 4.1. It’s not like its a necessary upgrade path. 4.2 requires completely new chips.

I think some of the features in 4.2 will play a large role in HomeKit devices, the next Apple Watch, and new headphones.

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You know I think they would have to move to at least 4.1 just for this:

“Coexistence

Bluetooth and 4G (LTE) famously don’t get on: their signals interfere degrading one another’s performance and draining battery life”-http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/bluetooth-4-1-what-is-it-and-why-should-you-care#1lhLJA3WiZm1uf0x.99

It’s hard to believe they didn’t have it with the iPhone 6

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluetooth#Bluetooth_v4.2

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I can’t see them having a Force Touch display and then a physical home button. And word if the home button gets force touch too? I know it won’t be integrated into the display, but just can’t see them having Force Touch and physical button together..

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I think it depends if they got the tech that incorporates touch ID into the display ready.

Or maybe not. I guess force touch would replace the capacitive ring needed to activate touch ID and the sensor could exist in it’s current location but just not need two separate mechanism.

I’d also like them to keep the home button (physical or not) seperate from the screen. But I’m not sure it make sense to give that area force touch sensors in addition to the the screen unless they can do it all as one big force touch area and only one part just has pixels and the other doesn’t.

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I hope they NEVER remove the physical button. There are benefits to a physical button. And force touch doesn’t quite fill that need.

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What is it missing?

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Interesting ? !! :) so with iPhone6s all I get is this

1. New iOS

2. Faster Speeds with the new Modem

3. Larger Battery Life.

No design change

No Size change

Is it really worth it if I am around wifi 24×7 ? How will i show off to my friends that it is 6S when it looks like 6 only ?? :(

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“double LTE speed” means double throttling down speeds from carriers. did i miss anything?

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Only for those that still have the fake “unlimited” data. For the rest of us that means reaching their limits only faster new?. :( Limits are stupid small, even land lines have them now when then didn’t have them before. The only reasons for limits are for profit, no other need is required any more.

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Increased theoretical speed means better battery life even if the raw throughput over a long period of time is the same.

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legal

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Great article, until I see this item “However, it does not appear that a slimmer iPhone is ready for 2015?- who is asking for a thinner iPhone :(.

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9to5Mac
Today
14 Points
New

Sports Rolling Stones exhibition to open at London gallery in 2016

They're more accustomed to stadiums, but the Rolling Stones are coming to a London art gallery.An exhibition of more than 500 recordings and artifacts from the band's archive will open at the Saatchi Gallery next year.

LONDON (AP) ? They're more accustomed to stadiums, but the Rolling Stones are coming to a London art gallery.

An exhibition of more than 500 recordings and artifacts from the band's archive will open at the Saatchi Gallery next year. Organizers said Wednesday it will "show how the band has changed the way we experience rock 'n' roll."

The "Exhibitionism" show will take in art, design, film, video, fashion and performance as well as music, and the artifacts include guitars, costumes, personal diaries and audio clips.

Mick Jagger said the band had been thinking about an exhibition for a long time, "but we wanted it to be just right and on a large scale."

"Exhibitionism" is slated to run from April to September 2016. Tickets go on sale July 10.

???

Online: www.stonesexhibitionism.com

The Denver Post
Today
10 Points

Sports Jim Caviezel to receive award from Jimmy Stewart Museum

29 fundraiser by the Jimmy Stewart foundation.The foundation and museum are based in Stewart's hometown of Indiana, Pennsylvania, about 45 miles northeast of Pittsburgh.Past winners include Carol Burnett, Janet Leigh and Shirley Jones. The foundation says "Caviezel's personal relationship with Jimmy Stewart acted as a catalyst to his own success as an actor.".

INDIANA, Pa. (AP) ? Jim Caviezel is being honored by a Pennsylvania museum dedicated to actor Jimmy Stewart.

Caviezel stars in the TV series "Person of Interest" and became widely known for his role in the movie "The Passion of the Christ." He will receive the Harvey Award at an Aug. 29 fundraiser by the Jimmy Stewart foundation.

The foundation and museum are based in Stewart's hometown of Indiana, Pennsylvania, about 45 miles northeast of Pittsburgh.

Past winners include Carol Burnett, Janet Leigh and Shirley Jones. The Harvey Award is named for the 1950 film in which Stewart befriends an invisible rabbit.

It's typically given to someone with connections to Stewart. The foundation says "Caviezel's personal relationship with Jimmy Stewart acted as a catalyst to his own success as an actor."

???

Online: http://www.jimmy.org

The Denver Post
Today
10 Points
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