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Travel Who'll be given the reins of Broncos ownership?

Works in NFL's junior rotational internship program.Annabel Victoria Bowlen, 21 Single. Nielsen Scarborough recently ranked the Broncos as having the seventh-best market penetration in the NFL and Forbes put Denver with the second-best fan base . Bowlen's long-term hope is for one of his children to run the team, any speculation on the transition of his ownership to one of them is premature. He's a successful businessman with eponymous car dealerships and restaurants.And Elway and Bowlen .

The Denver Broncos have as little as two years to determine which of Pat Bowlen's seven children will step into his shoes ? or face having to sell the team.

The NFL has made it clear that it will not allow the process of choosing a successor to go on indefinitely, giving the Pat Bowlen Trust just two years to make "significant progress," according to people familiar with the situation.

Bowlen hoped to keep the team in his family and a decade ago mapped out a succession plan through the trust, ensuring one of his children would take the lead ownership role.

But he didn't set a deadline, leaving it to three trustees ? including team president and CEO Joe Ellis ? to decide which of the children actually has the ability to do the job, The Denver Post has learned.

"It's incumbent upon us to have made progress toward getting one of the kids in that direction, significant progress, in those two years," Broncos co-owner John Bowlen, Pat's brother, told The Post.

Although the NFL has not set a precise time limit, John Bowlen said it's unclear how much longer than two years the league might be willing to wait ? if at all.

"Maybe two more, maybe five, maybe none," John Bowlen said. "We'll have to see."

When Pat Bowlen, 70, stepped aside in July as the team's CEO to deal with the effects of Alzheimer's disease, team officials made clear his ongoing desire to keep the Broncos in his family.

"I don't think he anticipated his demise would be as quick as this," John Bowlen said.

If none of the children can prove to the trustees they have the ability to run the team ? and some have shown an interest in trying ? then the family must sell, John Bowlen said.

"I think we'll know in two years who it will be," he said, "but whether they're ready to go is another matter."

John Bowlen said he doubts the NFL would be so harsh as to force a sale if a successor isn't at least identified within two years.

"I'm not sure (NFL commissioner) Roger (Goodell) would do that to Joe (Ellis) or Pat's family because they're that close," he said.

The NFL did not respond to requests for comment.

History of impatience

But the NFL has a history of impatience when it comes to ownership changes, typically giving no more than two years to hash things out.

The Buffalo Bills sold last week for a reported $1.4 billion, just six months after founder Ralph Wilson's death. Family members quickly took over teams when other owners died, including the Oakland Raiders, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Tennessee Titans and Detroit Lions.

And despite the tumultuous sale of some teams ? such as the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Los Angeles Clippers ? and worries that some new owners might move their franchises, the odds of the Broncos ever leaving Denver appear minuscule.

With its 13-year-old stadium and one of the league's best fan bases ? Nielsen Scarborough recently ranked the Broncos as having the seventh-best market penetration in the NFL and Forbes put Denver with the second-best fan base ? the team enjoys unparalleled support.

"I'm sure there are a number of people who would say that if it's not Pat Bowlen owning the team, it would be better just selling it, but it would not leave Denver," John Bowlen said.

For now, Pat Bowlen has handed the reins to Ellis, his longtime friend and confidant. And with former quarterback John Elway as general manager and vice president of football operations, the team appears in capable hands.

But that's temporary.

The future of the Denver Broncos is still very much in flux.

A family operation

From the day the Bowlens purchased the team from Edgar Kaiser in 1984, it was a family operation.

Unable to cover the $78 million purchase on his own, Pat Bowlen turned to his younger brother, John, who was heading the family oil and gas business in Calgary.

The generosity of their wildcat millionaire father, Paul, ensured the Broncos was a family-led legacy.

"Pat wanted to do it on his own, but there was a need to lean into the company for credit, which we did," said John Bowlen, president and CEO of Regent Resources Ltd. "Dad, on his death bed, said, 'Don't feed him to the wolves. Help your brother,' and we did. It was a family company and so would be the Broncos."

The Bowlens pretty much shared in the team equally, with Pat having a mild edge in order to satisfy NFL rules that require a majority partner to hold 30 percent.

Brother William Bowlen and sister Mary Elizabeth Jagger sold their interest back to the family in 1996 and 1997.

And when their mother, Arvella Regis Bowlen, died in 2006 at age 90, her interests were divided between Pat and John, making them whole owners of the Broncos, although paperwork shows that the team is held in holding company names.

Little has changed, said John Bowlen, who controlled as much as 49 percent of the Broncos but has been selling interest back to his brother.

At his death, the 40 percent John Bowlen retains today, though inherited by his children, would be sold to Pat's side of the family, John Bowlen said.

"They're obligated to take it out of my estate," he said. "But, ultimately, yes, it all goes back to the family."

Ellis in the lead chair

Although Ellis sits in the lead chair today, it's for the taking by one of Pat's children ? who range in age from 16 to 45.

"The desire is for one of Pat's children to show the ability to step into the role," John Bowlen said. "The wish is that one of those kids will demonstrate that ability."

The decision about which child takes over, John Bowlen said, rests with the three trustees: Ellis, 56; Broncos counsel Rich Slivka, 69; and Denver attorney Mary Kelly, 60.

Although John Bowlen remains the Broncos coordinator of corporate sponsorships, he said his work at Regent Resources keeps him too busy to consider trying to take on the team.

"It would take some pondering on my part," he said, noting the tax implications of such a choice. "It's not as if I don't have a say in things now, maybe not day to day, but some."

None of John Bowlen's children ? four daughters ranging in age from 16 to 41, and a 34-year-old son ? are allowed to take on ownership under the trust.

Some of Pat Bowlen's children already have a foot in the door.

Between Pat Bowlen's two daughters from his first marriage to Sally Parker, only the youngest, Jane Elizabeth "Beth" Bowlen Wallace, 44, is on board, working as the Broncos' director of special projects and events.

Her older sister, Amie Bowlen Klemmer, 45, lives in Hawaii.

Three of Pat Bowlen's children from his 34-year marriage to Annabel Bowlen also work in some capacity with the team or league.

Patrick III, 30, lives in Denver and is the facilities coordinator of the team's stadium management company.

Twenty-eight-year-old John Jr., named for his uncle, has a master's degree in business administration, with a concentration in sports and entertainment, from the University of Denver and has held a variety of jobs within the Broncos organization.

Brittany, 24, is a recent graduate of the University of Notre Dame and is a part of the NFL's junior rotational internship program in New York, which trains participants in the business side of the league.

It's too early to tell whether Pat Bowlen's youngest daughters ? Annabel, 21, who works in retail, and Christianna, 16, a high school sophomore ? will become active with the team and league.

Should the decision to sell be made ? by the NFL or the trustees ? any ownership change appears likely to include Elway.

"I would think, with all conjecture aside, that he would certainly have the inside track, if he wanted it," John Bowlen said. "It's almost a no-brainer."

And it's not difficult to see how or why.

"There's certainly a business precedent for player-led investment groups such as Magic Johnson and Wayne Gretzky," said Kevin Adler, founder and president of Engage Marketing in Chicago, a sports marketing company. "If Elway were to put the word out to acquire an investment group to get an ownership interest in the Broncos, people would line up."

The Denver Broncos released a statement early on Sunday morning on behalf of Pat Bowlen and his immediate family:

“Owner Pat Bowlen has indicated a strong desire to keep specifics of his estate planning private, and the Denver Broncos intend to honor his wishes.

“While Mr. Bowlen's long-term hope is for one of his children to run the team, any speculation on the transition of his ownership to one of them is premature. No timetable has been set for that process by the organization or the National Football League.

“There are no plans for the sale of the Denver Broncos, and the Pat Bowlen Trust will continue to implement the provisions set forth by Mr. Bowlen to keep the team in the Bowlen family.”

Elway, who did not respond to a request for an interview, has privately said he is unwilling to make any speculations.

Begin, end at Elway

While offering the Broncos for sale is likely to draw a number of suitors, insiders say the list would probably begin and end at John Elway.

After all, it almost did before.

In 1998, Elway's final season as a player, Pat Bowlen offered him a 10 percent stake in the team, according to copies of the agreement filed away in federal and state lawsuits over the deal.

Bowlen had offered Elway even more.

There was a second 10 percent piece of the team, according to the agreement, as well as a job as Bowlen's special assistant with an intent on eventually naming Elway, a Stanford University graduate, to the post of chief operating officer.

Elway's ownership deal extended to any NFL team Bowlen might own, according to the agreement. If Bowlen sold the Broncos, Elway would go with him.

With the team still in Denver, Elway would have gotten right of first refusal on any future sale, except for between Bowlen family members.

And if the Hall of Fame quarterback wanted to go it alone, Bowlen agreed to "use his influence to assist Elway in obtaining an NFL franchise if Elway so wishes."

Although Elway never signed the deal ? Ellis was with the Broncos as its executive vice president for business operations and Elway didn't see much room for himself in the front office ? the relationship he had with Bowlen remained sturdy.

Like Bowlen, Elway is one of Denver's favorite adopted sons, having brought home a pair of Super Bowl victories. He's a successful businessman with eponymous car dealerships and restaurants.

And Elway and Bowlen ? with Stan Kroenke ? co-owned the Colorado Crush Arena Football League team, until the league and team folded in 2008.

Elway came back to the Broncos in 2011 as executive vice president of football operations. He soon landed quarterback Peyton Manning and helped the team to its first Super Bowl appearance since 1999, when Elway was named the game's MVP and lifted the Lombardi Trophy.

Should the Bowlen family have to find a buyer, several NFL watchers say, who better than John Elway.

"Anytime a team has an opportunity to include a well-regarded patriarch of the sport into their ownership ? such as the Dodgers and Magic Johnson with the Guggenheim partnership ? it's a desirable thing," said David Carter, executive director of the Sports Business Institute at the University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business.

Figurehead athlete-owners are no longer the norm, he said.

"It doesn't work anymore to bring in an athlete and give him a percentage of the team just to hang in the window," Carter said. "And at this point in his business career, if Elway pursued an ownership, he might not even need Bowlen, though it would be nice to have that wind in your sails."

But no matter his past value as a quarterback or current value as a manager and executive ? any bid for ownership of the team today will come down to Elway's partners.

"It seems to me that it would be difficult not to approve of John," John Bowlen said, "but a mammoth part would be who my partners would approve.

"Ultimately," he said, "it is about who is with him."

The NFL today requires a single principal owner to have a 30 percent interest ? $420 million if the Broncos' value is kept conservative, at about $1.45 billion, according to Forbes ? and that is likely out of reach for Elway.

"It's really about whether they are individuals the NFL wants to allow into their treehouse," Carter said. "Money is critical, but so is knowing the market and having a business plan the league will subscribe to."

David Migoya: 303-954-1506, [email protected] or twitter.com/davidmigoya

The Bowlen children

Patrick Dennis Bowlen, right, has seven children, each of whom has the opportunity to become the new principal owner of the Denver Broncos.

Amie Bowlen Klemmer, 45 Mother is Bowlen's first wife, Sally Parker. Florida International University graduate. Married. Lives in Honolulu with her husband, Dr. Eric "Howie" Klemmer.

Jane Elizabeth "Beth" Bowlen Wallace, 44 Mother is Bowlen's first wife, Sally Parker. Married. University of Colorado Boulder graduate. Lives in Denver with her husband, John Wallace. Works as Broncos' director of special projects.

Patrick Dennis Bowlen III, 30 Married. University of Denver graduate. Lives in Denver with his wife, Mary Ellen. Works as Broncos' stadium facilities coordinator.

John Michael Bowlen Jr., 28 Single. Lives in Denver. University of Denver graduate. Works in variety of positions with the Broncos.

Brittany Alexandra Bowlen, 24 Single. University of Notre Dame graduate. Works in NFL's junior rotational internship program.

Annabel Victoria Bowlen, 21 Single. Lives in Denver. Works in the retail industry.

Christianna Elizabeth Bowlen, 16 Single. Lives in Denver. High school sophomore.

The Denver Post
21/09
20 Points
1

Aviation industry in Chicago to draw up new routes

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS September 21, 2014 10:54AM

About 3,000 decision makers in the aviation and tourism sectors have gathered in Chicago for a global conference to forge connections and develop new airline routes.

It’s the first time the World Route Development Forum, an event that’s been likened to speed-dating for the airline industry, is taking place in Chicago and only the second time it’s being held in the United States since it began two decades ago.

Executives from United, American, Emirates and Etihad Airways are among those who will speak and take part in panel discussions.

The event runs Sunday through Tuesday at Chicago’s McCormick Place convention center.

Chicago’s commissioner for aviation, Rosemarie Andolino, said the event is a chance the showcase the city and its two international airports and underscore the city’s role as a major aviation hub.

Chicago Sun-Times
21/09
19 Points
1

GM recalls 221K XTS, Impala sedans for fire risk

If the brake pads stay partially engaged with the rotor, excessive brake heat may result in a fire.GM says it knows of no accidents or injuries related to the defect.GM will notify owners and repair the vehicles for free. There are 205,309 vehicles affected in the U.S.; the rest of the vehicles are in Canada and elsewhere.GM says the electronic parking brake arm that applies pressure to the back of the brake pads may not fully retract after use.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS September 21, 2014 11:08AM

DETROIT ? General Motors is recalling 221,558 Cadillac XTS and Chevrolet Impala sedans because the brake pads can stay partially engaged even when they’re not needed, increasing the risk of a fire.

The recall involves Cadillacs from the 2013-2015 model years and Impalas from the 2014 and 2015 model years. There are 205,309 vehicles affected in the U.S.; the rest of the vehicles are in Canada and elsewhere.

GM says the electronic parking brake arm that applies pressure to the back of the brake pads may not fully retract after use. If the brake pads stay partially engaged with the rotor, excessive brake heat may result in a fire.

GM says it knows of no accidents or injuries related to the defect.

GM will notify owners and repair the vehicles for free.

Chicago Sun-Times
21/09
19 Points
1

UAW workers to vote on proposed Lear Corp contract

13, but returned to work the next day after the tentative deal was reached.UAW Local 2335 president Jaime Luna says the tentative agreement would end a system that locks newer workers into lower wages and raises the top wage to $21.58 an hour. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS September 21, 2014 12:32PM HAMMOND, Ind.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS September 21, 2014 12:32PM

HAMMOND, Ind. ? Workers at a Lear Corp. plant in Hammond that makes automotive seats are preparing to vote on a tentative agreement that ended a one-day strike.

United Auto Workers spokesman Sam Knowles says about 760 union members will begin voting Sunday afternoon on the tentative contract. Voting will continue into Sunday evening.

Workers at the Hammond plant about 30 miles southeast of Chicago make seats for the Explorer and Taurus models produced at Ford’s Chicago Assembly Plant. They went on strike Sept. 13, but returned to work the next day after the tentative deal was reached.

UAW Local 2335 president Jaime Luna says the tentative agreement would end a system that locks newer workers into lower wages and raises the top wage to $21.58 an hour.

Chicago Sun-Times
21/09
19 Points

Travel Avalanche whittle preseason roster down to 56 players

The Colorado Avalanche announced Sunday that they had reassigned 11 players to reduce their preseason roster to 56.

Five players were reassigned to the American Hockey League training camp, with the Lake Erie Monsters: D Gabriel Beaupre, D Max Iafrate, D Markus Lauridsen, D Joey Leach and C Marcus Power.

Five others were reassigned to their respective major junior teams: LW Oliver Cooper (Saint John, Quebec Major Junior Hockey League), D Duncan MacIntyre (Cape Breton, QMJHL), RW Nick Magyar (Kichener, Ontario Hockey League), G Spencer Martin (Mississauga, OHL) and D Kyle Wood (North Bay, OHL)

Defenseman Wilhelm Westlund was reassigned to his European team, Hasten of Sweden.

The Denver Post
21/09
16 Points
1 2

Travel NASA's Mars MAVEN mission set to enter Red Planet's orbit Sunday

MAVEN has traveled 442 million miles since its November launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla. LIVE BLOG: Updates of MAVEN arriving at MarsWhat MAVEN is set to study could bring large discoveries in understanding the existence of life outside our solar system and beyond, explained MAVEN co-investigator David Brain. MAVEN's computers will fire six thrusters for about 34 minutes to slow it down and capture it into orbit around Mars. typically hostile green beings bent on conquering Earth .

Mars has long served as inspiration for some of the world's best science fiction. Countless tales of martians ? typically hostile green beings bent on conquering Earth ? pervade our collective pop culture. But ask most people what facts they actually know about the Red Planet? Well, the easy answer is "not much."

NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution craft, or MAVEN, scheduled to enter orbit around Mars on Sunday night, may change all that.

MAVEN has traveled 442 million miles since its November launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The $671 million mission has deep Colorado roots: It was built in Littleton by Lockheed Martin Space Systems; Centennial-based United Launch Alliance provided the launch vehicle; mission operations are being handled at Lockheed's Waterton Canyon facility in Jefferson County; and science operations are being led by University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics.

About $300 million of the project budget remained in Colorado, CU officials say.

LIVE BLOG: Updates of MAVEN arriving at Mars

What MAVEN is set to study could bring large discoveries in understanding the existence of life outside our solar system and beyond, explained MAVEN co-investigator David Brain.

"What excites me most is trying to figure out what the planet used to be in the past or what it's going to be like in the future," said Brain, who is also an assistant professor in CU's astrophysical and planetary sciences department. "When you have really big questions like, 'Where did we come from?' and 'Why is Earth the place that seems to be able to host life?' you don't always have really grand answers for those questions. Sometimes you make progress by picking a small, but really important, piece of the puzzle. So that's what MAVEN is doing, in broad terms."

Doing science

While in orbit, MAVEN will study Mars' outer atmosphere in an attempt to understand the planet's climate history. Scientists know there was once liquid water that flowed over Mars' surface ? for thousands or hundreds of thousands of years ? but what happened to it? Scientists believe the atmospheric particles that provided the right environment either went down to the surface of the planet, or went up and escaped gravity into space.

"The interesting puzzle is that the atmosphere of Mars is incapable of supporting water in a liquid state at the surface for more than a few hours," Brain said. "So, you can infer that Mars has changed, and the martian atmosphere has changed, and since liquid water is so crucial for life on Earth ... it becomes really a compelling question to figure out how."

There are nine main scientific instruments aboard MAVEN that fall into three categories. One set will measure the sun's influences on the martian atmosphere in an attempt to determine the type of solar energy that gave the atmospheric particles enough juice to escape gravity. Another set will measure what Brain calls the "swimming pool" ? the atmospheric particles at the upper atmospheric level that could escape at some point. (Fun fact: One of these instruments is referred to as a "particle sniffer.")

The final category of instruments will measure the particles that are escaping the planet.

"There's really a 10th instrument ?the spacecraft itself," Brain said. "We're using how the spacecraft gets pushed around as a 10th set of science data to tell us something about the swimming pool of the atmosphere."

As an added bonus, the MAVEN team will also be able to study Comet Siding Spring as it hurtles past Mars in October.

A nail-biter

On Sunday night, MAVEN will move off the trajectory that would send it whizzing past Mars and maneuver itself into orbiting around the planet.

"It's easy-schmeasy, pizza pie, of course." Brain joked.

Guy Beutelschies, Lockheed's director of space exploration systems, serves as the program manager on the MAVEN project. His team, many of whom have served on previous NASA missions to Mars, have prepared for Sunday's insertion by studying past failures, conducting tests of every possibly scenario, running hundreds of simulations and stress testing all of MAVEN's components.

"The reason (orbit insertion) is a big event is you only get one shot," Beutelschies said. "We really devote a lot of effort to making sure it all goes perfect the first time, because the first time is the only time."

There will be no Earth-to-space ground control inserting MAVEN into Mars' orbit Sunday.

"We've loaded all the instructions on board the spacecraft to monitor and execute the insertion," Beutelschies explained. "If MAVEN sees problems, it has the smarts on board to take action to recover and readjust."

Once MAVEN nears Mars, it will turn itself around, and the craft's high-gain antenna will go offline. MAVEN's computers will fire six thrusters for about 34 minutes to slow it down and capture it into orbit around Mars. If those computers malfunction, they can self-restart, recalculate the thruster fire time, and attempt the insertion.

"Once we're there, it's a lot more straightforward to change the spacecraft's orbit to make it smaller so we can do our science," Brain said. "As soon as that burn is over, and MAVEN sends the message 'Hey, I'm here,' ... then the work of commanding starts immediately."

After entering orbit, MAVEN's instruments will be awakened, tested and deployed over about six weeks. Some will start taking observations. The official "start of science" is Nov. 8, 2014, and will go for one year, after which LASP can apply for more NASA funding to continue the work.

"I know that NASA headquarters is really happy with this team and how they approach problems and handle problems and all seem to pull together," Brain said. "That got us to the launch pad on time, and I think that's going to put us into orbit around Mars without any difficulty."

Lockheed has been involved in every NASA Mars mission to date. This gives Beutelschies confidence in his team and the mission's success.

"It's like going to the big game: You practice, you've done everything you can, you've got the best team on the field, but you still have little butterflies," he said. "It's exciting."

As for Brain? MAVEN is the first full spacecraft mission he's worked on.

"It's really thrilling to be a part of. I can't believe I get to do this for my job," he said. "Yeah ... it's really cool."

Laura Keeney: 303-954-1337, [email protected] or twitter.com/LauraKeeney

Want to watch?

The public is invited to a free orbit insertion watch party at 6:30 p.m Sunday at the University of Colorado at Boulder. You can also monitor MAVEN live through NASA Eyes, which is tracking the spacecraft's journey.

The Denver Post
21/09
16 Points
1

Rookie NYPD cop killed, 8 officers injured as patrol van crashes in Bronx

A rookie police officer died Sunday morning when an NYPD van bound for the United Nations crashed in the Bronx, police said.Michael Williams, 25, was ejected from the rear of the vehicle when it slammed into a Jersey barrier just before 5:43 a.m., NYPD Chief of Department Philip Banks said. Michael Williams, 25, died after a patrol van crashed early Sunday morning. when it struck a center divide.Sam Costanza/for New York Daily News Authorities on the scene of the fatal crash.
Michael Williams, 25, died after a patrol van crashed early Sunday morning.

A rookie police officer died Sunday morning when an NYPD van bound for the United Nations crashed in the Bronx, police said.

Michael Williams, 25, was ejected from the rear of the vehicle when it slammed into a Jersey barrier just before 5:43 a.m., NYPD Chief of Department Philip Banks said. Eight other officers were injured.

Williams had just joined the force in January.

“That’s all he ever wanted to do was become a police officer,” Banks said.

“It was a dream come true that he was able to serve in the department. We are certainly going to miss Michael.”

Banks said investigators were examining whether early morning showers were to blame for the tragic crash. 

William Soto, a police scanner buff, ran down to the scene after he heard the call come over the radio from his apartment nearby. 

Sam Costanza/for New York Daily News A police patrol van was heading south down Bruckner Blvd. when it struck a center divide.Sam Costanza/for New York Daily News Authorities on the scene of the fatal crash. Previous Next Enlarge

“The driver looked bad,” Soto said. “He was bleeding from his head and his chest was pumping like he was gasping for air.”

The officers were en route to two security details ? one for Sunday’s massive rally regarding climate change, the second for the UN General Assembly. 

“This morning they woke up to do a job that’s important: to protect people’s right to protest,” said Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association Patrick Lynch

“Say a prayer for this family so they can get through.”

The van was heading west down Bruckner Blvd. when it struck the center divide in Hunts Point under the Sheridan Expressway, Banks said. The van scraped along the barrier for roughly one block from Longfellow Ave. to near Bryant Ave.

Williams was rushed to Lincoln Medical Center, but could not be saved, police said. 

Richard Harbus/New York Daily News An NYPD officer who was killed after an earlier accident is taken away in an ambulance as officers salute at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx.Richard Harbus/New York Daily News A crowd stands by as the cops salute the fallen officer.Richard Harbus/New York Daily News Eight other officers were injured in the incident. Previous Next Enlarge

Mayor de Blasio said he and Police Commissioner William Bratton would visit with Williams’ devastated parents.

“This was a guy just starting out who loved what he was doing as a police officer, had a whole bright future ahead, and to be lost in this tragic accident ? really all of us this morning felt heartsick,” said de Blasio, adding he’d attended Williams’ graduation from police academy at Madison Square Garden mere months ago.

Just before noon his casket, draped in an American flag, was loaded into an NYPD truck at the hospital. More than 75 cops gave a solemn, silent salute. Williams grieving parents exited shortly after and got into a highway patrol cruiser without speaking to reporters. 

“Thank you for showing respect for a fallen comrade,” an inspector told the cops.

Banks said that Williams’ father, also named Michael, was a worked as police officer in Carmel, N.Y. for 32 years.

His heartbroken aunt, Karen Fransen, told the Daily News that Williams was an excellent basketball player who played at Keene State College in New Hampshire

Sam Costanza One cop died and eight police officers were injured in the crash.

“He was just a great kid and he worked very hard at everything he wanted to achieve,” Fransen said. 

“He was looking forward to a long career and it was just cut very short.”

Emergency responders transported four other officers to Lincoln Medical Center, two to St. Barnabas Hospital and two to Jacobi Hospital, fire officials said. 

Six officers were treated and released, authorities said. 

One of the passengers suffered lacerations to his head and an injured right shoulder. All eight were expected to make a full recovery.

With Erin Durkin

[email protected]

Related Stories Cyclist not charged in Central Park collision that put pedestrian on ventilator
Daily News
21/09
19 Points

Arts Tonight's TV picks: Tea Leoni is 'Madame Secretary'

WATCH THIS:"Madam Secretary" (8 p.m., CBS): The new high-stakes political drama stars Tea Leoni as a college professor who is suddenly tapped to be the nation's secretary of state. Of course, diplomatic calamities quickly ensue."The Good Wife" (9 p.m., CBS): The sixth season launches, and we have questions: Will Alicia (Juliana Margulies) run for state attorney.

WATCH THIS:

"Madam Secretary" (8 p.m., CBS): The new high-stakes political drama stars Tea Leoni as a college professor who is suddenly tapped to be the nation's secretary of state. Of course, diplomatic calamities quickly ensue.

"The Good Wife" (9 p.m., CBS): The sixth season launches, and we have questions: Will Alicia (Juliana Margulies) run for state attorney? Will Diane (Christine Baranski) actually jump ship? Will Emmy voters ever realize how good this show is?

"Masterpiece Mystery!" (9 p.m., PBS): Agatha Christie's Miss Marple returns for more sleuthing in "A Caribbean Mystery." While staying at a lavish tropical island hotel, she investigates the suspicious death of a fellow guest and unravels a web of deceit, murder and "dark magic."

Also on Sunday:

Contact Chuck Barney at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.ChuckBarney, or Twitter.com/chuckbarney.

San Jose Mercury News
21/09
17 Points
1

Michigan woman's body found inside 55-gallon drum sealed with concrete

Scott Wobbe (pictured) was DeKeyzer’s boyfriend and the main suspect in her disappearance and murder. The owner of the storage facility said a man rented the space nine days before her disappearance. Her body was discovered in a storage lot.Facebook The 22-year-old had been missing since June.
National Missing and Unidentified Persons System Theresa DeKeyzer, 22, was found dead on Friday. Her body was discovered in a storage lot.Facebook The 22-year-old had been missing since June. The owner of the storage facility said a man rented the space nine days before her disappearance. Previous Next Enlarge

The body of a Michigan woman who had been missing for three months has been found inside a concrete-filled 55-gallon plastic drum.

Theresa DeKeyzer's body was found at a storage facility in Detroit.

The 22-year-old had been missing since June 16 when her 37-year-old boyfriend Scott Wobbe, the last person to see her alive, said he dropped her off four blocks from her home, reports the Detroit News.

Wobbe is currently in jail for violating probation in a Midland County assault and drug case.

Police say he is the main suspect in the disappearance, reported the Detroit Free Press.

Since disappearing, DeKeyzer had not used her cellphone or accessed her bank account.

Scott Wobbe (pictured) was DeKeyzer’s boyfriend and the main suspect in her disappearance and murder.

Her body was found on Thursday at the Travel Trailer Storage facility in Plymouth Township. Police found the body after executing a search warrant following a tip-off.

They used x-ray equipment to determine what was in the drum.

DeKeyzer was identified by her tattoos, clothing and jewelry.

Storage facility manager Doris Temple told the Detroit Free Press that the discovery of the body was "kind of frightening".

Temple said a man had rented the storage facility nine days before DeKeyzer went missing.

"It was an enclosed trailer, it had no windows, no nothing, just the back opens, that's it," she added.

The day before she disappeared, there was a report of domestic assault against Wobbe after he punched DeKeyzer in the face, reports the Detroit News.

WJBK The facility where DeKeyzer’s body was discovered.

Melody Baetens, a cousin of DeKeyzer who works for the newspaper, said the family was "heartbroken".

"They have a lot of family support and they're going to get through it," she said.

In a statement the family said: "We have suffered a terrible loss and we appreciate all of the love, prayers and support during this time."

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Daily News
21/09
17 Points

King Fire: Huge blaze grows despite 5,000 firefighters

"That's what makes it difficult for a direct attack," McMillian said. Another wildfire that destroyed 37 homes near Yosemite National Park was 93 percent contained. While officials confirmed that several structures have been damaged or destroyed in the King Fire, dangerous conditions have so far prevented them from determining an exact number or how many of them were homes, fire spokesman Mike McMillian said.

POLLOCK PINES -- As an expanding wildfire in Northern California kept nearly 3,000 people from their homes, teams sought to find out how many structures had already been lost to the huge blaze, authorities said.

While officials confirmed that several structures have been damaged or destroyed in the King Fire, dangerous conditions have so far prevented them from determining an exact number or how many of them were homes, fire spokesman Mike McMillian said.

The fire some 60 miles east of Sacramento grew to more than 128 square miles Saturday, and gathering thunderstorms could either help or harm the firefight with moisture or wind, authorities said.

The blaze began one week ago, and a man accused of starting the blaze is being held on $10 million bail. It is just 10 percent contained.

More than 5,000 firefighters -- from as far as Florida and Alaska -- are helping California crews battle the blaze that has not only consumed grass and brush, but swaths of extremely dry tall timber.

"That's what makes it difficult for a direct attack," McMillian said. "The main fuel that is burning is the tall timber. We're making some progress, but it is slow going in some areas as we're trying to construct more contingency and control lines."

About 100 evacuees have been allowed to return home, but some 2,700 remain under evacuation orders, Cal Fire said in a statement.

Also of concern are possible wind gusts of up to 30 mph that could push the fire, which has spread from the north to the south, state fire spokeswoman Lynne Tolmachoff said.

"That would open up a whole new area for it to burn in," Tolmachoff said.

The fire has spread to the Tahoe National Forest northwest of Lake Tahoe, McMillian said. Also, the fire is threatening a key University of California, Berkeley research station that his home to scores of experiments on trees, plants and other wildlife.

Wayne Allen Huntsman, 37, pleaded not guilty to an arson charge Friday in El Dorado County Superior Court.

Authorities have not said what evidence they have linking Huntsman to the fire, by far one of the largest of about a dozen fires burning statewide.

Meanwhile, a wildfire in the town of Weed near the Oregon border was fully contained Saturday after burning 479 acres and destroying 143 homes. Another wildfire that destroyed 37 homes near Yosemite National Park was 93 percent contained.

San Jose Mercury News
21/09
19 Points

Money Oracle's Larry Ellison: Fierce competitor who doesn't like to quit

The title of Wilson's book, "The Difference Between God and Larry Ellison," refers to a Silicon Valley wisecrack that concludes: "God doesn't think he's Larry Ellison."But Ellison's flamboyance is mostly a sideshow to Oracle's success, said longtime analyst R. Though he's been foiled in efforts to acquire a pro basketball team, Ellison owns a Southern California tennis stadium and the rights to a tournament held there.More quietly, Ellison has stepped up his philanthropy.

Larry Ellison, the famously combative Oracle CEO and one of the world's richest self-made men, once told a TV interviewer that "my personality didn't allow me to quit while I'm losing." Then he added, "My personality doesn't allow me to quit while I'm winning."

He concluded, "I just can't quit."

Ellison isn't quitting, he and other Oracle executives insisted this week, after the 70-year-old company founder announced he's handing off the CEO title and taking the less hands-on job of executive chairman. But the transition marks a changing of the guard: Ellison, a swashbuckling figure in both his business and personal life, was one of Silicon Valley's longest-reigning CEOs and the last in a generation of founders -- including Microsoft's Bill Gates, Apple's Steve Jobs and Sun Microsystems' Scott McNealy -- who built the infrastructure of modern computing and steered the leading tech companies in decades past.

Today's most prominent tech CEOs tend to be heads of newer companies, such as Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Google's Larry Page, that deliver online software or services on top of that infrastructure. Neither is likely to be called "swashbuckling."

While many of his peers have retired or died, Ellison has remained a powerful figure in Silicon Valley, pushing Oracle to gobble up smaller companies and publicly assailing his rivals, through lawsuits and blistering news releases. Oracle is one of the world's biggest commercial software makers, with annual sales of $38 billion and a stock value of more than $185 billion.

He's also cut a colorful figure as an amateur pilot of fighter jets, a winner and chief sponsor of the America's Cup yachting regatta, and a four-times divorced, still-eligible bachelor who's currently dating a Ukrainian-born actress turned wildlife activist.

"He is one of those bigger-than-life personalities," said Rob Enderle, a tech industry analyst and longtime Silicon Valley observer. "His company very much revolves around him, not too differently from the way that Apple revolved around Jobs."

Ellison, a college dropout and adopted son of a Russian immigrant, built that company and a personal fortune estimated at $51 billion -- Forbes ranks him fifth richest in the world -- by competing fiercely and vocally.

After working as a freelance programmer, he started Oracle with two partners in 1977, selling database software to the CIA. Oracle now dominates the market for database programs, used for everything from airline reservation systems to automated banking. But it's expanded to sell a wide range of commercial technology, from computer hardware to specialized software for niche industries.

In the 1990s, Ellison vowed Oracle would surpass Microsoft as the biggest-selling software company in the world. He later admitted hiring investigators who searched the trash of a Washington group he suspected of being a Microsoft front.

Asked how he'd feel if Microsoft did the same, Ellison told reporters: "We will ship our garbage to Redmond, and they can go through it."

In the ensuing decade, Ellison won a bitter takeover battle to acquire PeopleSoft for $10 billion. He took out newspaper ads that vowed to crush IBM's hardware business, after Oracle bought computer-maker Sun Microsystems for $7.4 billion. And he publicly blasted Hewlett-Packard's 2010 move to oust then-CEO Mark Hurd, calling it "the worst personnel decision since the idiots on the Apple board fired Steve Jobs." Jobs and Hurd were Ellison's personal friends; he soon hired Hurd as Oracle co-president.

He also pursued back-to-back, high-profile lawsuits claiming theft of Oracle's copyrighted software, scoring a win against German rival SAP and an embarrassing loss to Google, though Oracle won an appeal.

Ellison is driven by the notion that "if he creates an enemy, he can vanquish it," biographer Mike Wilson told this newspaper in 2010. The title of Wilson's book, "The Difference Between God and Larry Ellison," refers to a Silicon Valley wisecrack that concludes: "God doesn't think he's Larry Ellison."

But Ellison's flamboyance is mostly a sideshow to Oracle's success, said longtime analyst R. "Ray" Wang of Constellation Research Group. Calling him an industry "grandmaster," Wang said Ellison's real accomplishment was building a powerhouse sales operation and offering virtually every kind of technology big businesses can use, "from the bottom up."

Oracle's growth has slowed recently; critics say Ellison was slow to embrace cloud computing, in which software is stored in data centers and delivered over the Internet. Ellison has sought to rebuff new competition by acquiring several cloud-computing companies.

At the same time, Ellison has relished the trappings that come with his long tenure as one of the most highly paid executives in the world. Though his annual salary is fixed at one dollar, Ellison's total pay including stock options was $79 million last year.

Earlier stock grants helped pay for the $100 million compound in Woodside that's been his home for many years, along with mansions in San Francisco and Newport, R.I., beachfront properties at Lake Tahoe and Malibu -- and the Hawaiian island of Lanai, which Ellison bought for a reported $300 million in 2012.

He also spent hundreds of millions, and ultimately succeeded, in a decade-long quest to win the America's Cup. Though he's been foiled in efforts to acquire a pro basketball team, Ellison owns a Southern California tennis stadium and the rights to a tournament held there.

More quietly, Ellison has stepped up his philanthropy. He ranked among the nation's leading charitable donors last year after transferring $72 million to his own Lawrence Ellison Foundation. While the foundation initially focused on biomedical research -- prompting cynics to scoff that Ellison wants to live forever -- it has expanded to support education and wildlife conservation.

Ellison made society-blog headlines this summer by hosting a benefit that raised $600,000 for a wildlife rescue center in Southern California. It was held at Malibu Nikita, a swanky oceanfront eatery backed by Ellison and named for his actress girlfriend, Nikita Kahn.

With all that to keep him busy, Ellison had already turned over most of Oracle's sales and business operations to Hurd and chief financial officer Safra Catz, who will now share CEO duties. But in claiming the title of chief technology officer, as well as chairman, analysts say Ellison has signaled he'll keep a hand in new products.

And though it seems unlikely, Ellison could still return as CEO. Over the years, he has groomed several potential successors, only to drive them away after deciding he wasn't ready to give up the reins.

"I enjoy competition," Ellison told an audience in 2009. "I think life is a series of acts of discovery."

Follow this reporter at Twitter.com/BrandonBailey or google.com/+BrandonBaileyOnline or on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/ULIOfb

San Jose Mercury News
21/09
19 Points
1

Money What will make stocks go even higher?

Related: Why investors remain unfazed by ISIS What could trigger a market descent. In Russell's mind, if the economy started to look too weak, investors would start to fret about the prospects for the recovery. A 'not too hot, not too cold' economy: For stocks to keep going up, the Fed has to cooperate and not hike interest rates before investors expect it to, which right now is the summer of 2015. Real earnings growth: In addition to the Fed, earnings have been the mother's milk of the bull market.

Stocks hit fresh records last week after the Federal Reserve soothed investors' concerns by indicating that it's probably not going to raise interest rates anytime soon.

With the S&P 500 up nearly 9% this year, traders warning of a market pullback seem wrong, at least for now.

Related: Most loved and hated stocks right now

Here's what needs to happen for stocks to climb even higher:

1. A 'not too hot, not too cold' economy: For stocks to keep going up, the Fed has to cooperate and not hike interest rates before investors expect it to, which right now is the summer of 2015.

The Fed is likely to play along if the economy continues moving at a "not too hot, not too cold" rate, according to Jim Russell, Senior Equities Strategist for U.S. Bank Wealth Management..

"The economic numbers are really coming in right on script," he said.

In Russell's mind, if the economy started to look too weak, investors would start to fret about the prospects for the recovery. On the other hand, if it was looking incredibly robust, there could be some concern that the Fed would need to hike interest rates earlier than most strategists are currently forecasting.

Related: More US families own cats than stocks

2. Real earnings growth: In addition to the Fed, earnings have been the mother's milk of the bull market. Companies are growing their bottom lines, but most of the healthy profits of the past few years have come largely through cost-cutting.

As the overall economic picture gets better, stocks could see a real boost if companies can show that they're actually growing revenue because people are buying more things.

"If the economy continues to improve, I want to see organic top line growth from corporate America," said Robert Landry, a money manager with USAA investments in San Antonio, Texas.

3. Geopolitical stability: Geopolitical risk has been responsible for various market shocks this year, but they have all been short-lived. That trend should continue as long as the these situations don't spin out of control.

The current crises may sound nerve wrecking with the United States getting ready for an extended campaign against ISIS and turmoil between Russia and the West over Ukraine still tense even after the cease-fire. But Landry claims that most times these things blow over quickly as far as the markets are concerned.

"Sometimes there's pretty negative reactions to these events when they occur, but the most typical reaction is that markets tend to rebound fairly quickly," he said.

Related: Why investors remain unfazed by ISIS

What could trigger a market descent? Of course, market drops are never easy to predict, and there are plenty of things that could cause stocks to reverse course.

For one, stock valuations are pretty steep. The S&P 500 is trading at 15.6 times next year's earnings compared to its 10-year price to earnings ratio average of 14.1.

And there's some worry that economic woes in Europe could curtail corporate profits. Russell noted that the market should get a better of idea of what effect Europe is having on business fortunes when companies start to release pre-earnings announcements in the coming weeks.

At the same time, even if stocks were to take a breather, that wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing, according to Landry.

"Pullbacks tend to be healthy, especially when you have some outsize gains within a short period of time," he said.

CNN
21/09
16 Points
1

Tax refunds will be cut for ACA recipients

Realistically, if you cannot afford insurance, you'd need some credit in advance.To be sure, there are some caps on the amount filers must pay back and the cap is based on household income. See HealthCare.gov to report "income and life changes."Of course, many people may have no idea that they'd need to report changes.The IRS put out some more details on the issue mid-month.What should you report.

A significant benefit of the Affordable Care Act is the opportunity to receive money-saving tax credits up front to cut the overall cost of health insurance, but now hundreds of thousands of consumers could owe back some of that money next April.

Those affected took advance payments of the premium tax credit for health insurance. Some married couples could owe $600 or $1,500 or $2,500 or even more. It might feel like a raw deal for some who are already suffocating under the escalating costs of health insurance.

"Health insurance is confusing enough, and now they're adding the complexities of the Tax Code," said Lorena Bencsik, a member of the Michigan Association of CPAs and owner of Prime Numbers in Ferndale.

When you file that 2014 tax return next year, the Internal Revenue Service will compare your actual income for the year with the amount you estimated when applying for exchange-based health insurance under the health insurance law.

The next open enrollment period begins Nov. 15. But notices were sent this week to some consumers whose incomes don't match up to such things as 2012 tax return information.

On Monday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said at least 279,000 households reported incomes that still don't match what the government has on record. Supporting documents are needed by Sept. 30.

What can you do to avoid tax-time problems?

Experts say people need to realize early on that they should report changes in income and other changes in one's life, such as a marriage, throughout the year. See HealthCare.gov to report "income and life changes."

Of course, many people may have no idea that they'd need to report changes.

The IRS put out some more details on the issue mid-month.

What should you report? A move, an increase or decrease in income, a marriage or divorce, the birth or adoption of a child, whether you started a job that offers health insurance and whether you gained or lost eligibility for other health care coverage.

Best spots for information: HealthCare.gov and IRS.gov/aca.

Karen Pollitz, senior fellow with the Kaiser Family Foundation, said many people who qualify for these tax credits aren't working 9-to-5 jobs with regular salaries. So guesstimating one's income for the coming year can be very tough.

"It's people in transition. Maybe they're in and out of work," she said. Or maybe they're self-employed.

People who lose a job would want to report that change during the year, as well, because that change can lead to a higher advance payment for the credit.

"Life changes can drive tax changes," said Mark Steber, chief tax officer for Jackson Hewitt Tax Service.

Steber stressed that people need to make sure to update information via HealthCare.gov or their state insurance exchanges.

The Kaiser Family Foundation site has a calculator to help figure out potential tax credits, based on one's situation.

Premium tax credits are available to individuals and families with incomes between 100% of the federal poverty line ($23,550 for a family of four this year) and 400% of the federal poverty line ($94,200 for a family of four) who purchase coverage in the health insurance marketplace in their state.

The tax credits are paid directly to the insurer, if taken in advance. People are not required to take the entire credit in advance. Realistically, if you cannot afford insurance, you'd need some credit in advance.

To be sure, there are some caps on the amount filers must pay back and the cap is based on household income. The cap ranges from $300 to $1,250 for some single taxpayers and $600 to $2,500 for married taxpayers, again based on income.

But if the income is 400% or more above the poverty line, there is no cap and the taxpayer must pay back the full amount.

Rules exist for qualifying for the premium tax credit: You must buy health insurance through the marketplace; you're not eligible for coverage through an employer or government plan; your income must be within certain limits; you do not file a married-filing-separately federal tax return (unless you meet certain exceptions, such as victims of domestic abuse and spousal abandonment) and you cannot be claimed as a dependent by another person.

The actual credit would vary based on how close your are to the federal poverty level, your age, the size of your family and where you live.

Sadly, it's fair to say some people will see some unexpected, unpleasant surprises on their tax returns next year.

Contact Susan Tompor at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @tompor.

USA Today
21/09
16 Points
1

Batman-obsessed ex-Miami cop busted for molestation, child porn

The ex-cop, who called himself 'Batman,' is facing child porn and molestation charges. WTVJ Roman was facing child porn charges when he was re-arrested Saturday and charged with molestation.WTVJ Police said the sicko set up a camera in the bathroom of his Biscayne Bay home and filmed himself assaulting a 7-year-old girl. Related Stories Florida babysitter sentenced to 30 years for child porn Police find 50 dead cats inside Florida home .
The Miami Herald Juan Roman, 57, in an undated photo. The ex-cop, who called himself 'Batman,' is facing child porn and molestation charges.

A child porn-addicted ex-cop with a Batman fetish is now facing sex abuse charges after investigators discovered a video of him fondling a 7-year-old girl in his Florida home.

Juan Roman, a former Miami cop who called himself "Batman," had been free on bond on child porn charges before he was re-arrested Saturday after investigators found the sickening clip on his computer, the Miami Herald reported.

The one-time detective was booked into Miami-Dade jail and ordered held without bail.

Police discovered the disturbing video on Roman's hard drive on Thursday.

It appeared as though he'd set up a hidden camera in a bathroom of his Biscayne Bay home and then recorded himself molesting the child, the Herald reported.

WTVJ Roman was facing child porn charges when he was re-arrested Saturday and charged with molestation.WTVJ Police said the sicko set up a camera in the bathroom of his Biscayne Bay home and filmed himself assaulting a 7-year-old girl. Previous Next Enlarge

Roman, 57, first caught notice of federal investigators last month when cyber-crime sleuths discovered he'd been trading child porn on his laptop.

He was arrested in late August, and police raided his home.

They later found more than 500 X-rated videos of young boys and girls on the machine.

He also appeared to have a sick sexual hang-up with the Caped Crusader.

The former detective was hit with a rack of charges and was being held without bond.

One collection of pics showed him striking several different poses while wearing a Batman mask, cape and "Dark Knight"-themed underpants, the Herald said.

The creep, who has a Batman tattoo, even had a chilling nickname for the computer hard drive that harbored his child porn stash: the Batcave, the newspaper said.

Along with the child porn charges, Roman was now facing a rack of new counts, including lewd and lascivious molestation of a child.

Neighbors said they were disgusted by the new allegations.

"I always thought we were safe because we stay next to a cop," one told NBC Miami.

Related Stories Florida babysitter sentenced to 30 years for child porn Police find 50 dead cats inside Florida home
Daily News
21/09
15 Points
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