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Arts Review: 'Zoolander No. 2' is a hot mess

Let's hope the ending will leave Stiller satisfied enough to never feel the need to make "Zoolander No. 3." Contact Tony Hicks at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.TonyHicks or Twitter.com/tonyhicks67'Zoolander No. Too bad, because the predecessor, 2001's "Zoolander," was a hilariously fresh take on the silly world of high fashion. As the sequel opens, Zoolander's dream of running a reading school for kids has literally crumbled.

When Kiefer Sutherland is the funniest person in your movie, you have a problem.

Unfortunately, "Zoolander No. 2" is exactly what its trailers make it look like: A once wonderfully funny idea beaten to death with the same jokes that seemed much better 15 years ago. Despite the best attempts by writers Ben Stiller and Justin Theroux to actually advance the plot, "Zoolander No. 2" falls somewhere between the second and third Austin Powers movies on the laugh scale.

Too bad, because the predecessor, 2001's "Zoolander," was a hilariously fresh take on the silly world of high fashion. But as the sequel makes clear, they should have left it there.

The original ended with our heroes -- the world's greatest male model, Derek Zoolander (Stiller), and his friend and fellow model Hansel (Owen Wilson) -- saving the fashion world from the evil antics of Mugatu (played hilariously -- in 2001 -- by Will Ferrell). As the sequel opens, Zoolander's dream of running a reading school for kids has literally crumbled. After losing his wife and son and alienating Hansel, Derek has gone into hiding. Meanwhile, Hansel journeys into the vast desert wastelands of outer Malibu with his new family (and by "new," I mean something no one has ever dreamed of), and the fashion world has moved on.

Except, of course, it hasn't. Someone is killing the world's greatest pop stars (launching the story by taking out Justin Bieber more violently than how Sonny Corleone got it at the toll booth was easily the movie's most inspiring idea), and Interpol's fashion division, led by former swimsuit model-turned cop Valentina (Penelope Cruz), is investigating.

Good guys and bad guys both have their reasons for wanting Derek and Hansel to come out of retirement. Valentina needs them, because all the dead pop stars expired with one of Derek's patented "looks" on their faces. The bad guys, led by Mugatu and evil fashionista Alexanya Atoz (Kristen Wiig, in an overbaked performance that seems wholly unnecessary), want them for reasons dating back to the beginning of time.

Derek is on a quest to get back his son, whom the authorities had taken away as a toddler because of Derek's horrific parental skills. He reunites with Hansel, who is trying to find himself, and the adventure begins -- fueled by many of the same gags that have gone stale over 15 years.

The film does have a few funny moments -- Benedict Cumberbatch is genius as All, the world's new, great, genderless supermodel. Sutherland is hilariously sensitive as a member of Hansel's "orgy," his group of co-habitators that include all genders and ages and even a goat. One particularly funny scene involves Hansel's old orgy stumbling upon him in a precarious situation with a group that includes Willie Nelson and a baby hippo.

Beyond that, "Zoolander No. 2" is just a redo of the first movie and induces the same eye-rolling disappointment many of us felt watching Mike Myers run the Austin Powers concept into the ground. At least it's still easy to kind of like Derek and Hansel. But Ferrell's Mugatu is absolutely painful to watch and hear; it seems he had to compensate for not knowing where to take the character by making him as loud and obnoxious as possible.

Somehow, the last 10 minutes manage to bring some laughs, as if Stiller and company put all their energy into a last-gasp grab for giggles. There's even a fun little twist. Let's hope the ending will leave Stiller satisfied enough to never feel the need to make "Zoolander No. 3."

Contact Tony Hicks at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.TonyHicks or Twitter.com/tonyhicks67

'Zoolander No. 2'

* *

Rating: PG-13 (crude and sexual content, a scene of exaggerated violence and brief strong language)

Cast: Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson, Penelope Cruz, Will Ferrell, Kristen Wiig

Director: Ben Stiller

Running time: 1 hour, 40 minutes

Opens: Feb. 12 in wide release

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
16 Points

US stocks waver in late-afternoon trading

In Asia, Japan's Nikkei 225 sank 2.3 percent and is down about 11 percent in the past month. Time Warner shed $2.54 to $60.69.OVERSEAS: In Europe, Germany's DAX added 1.6 percent, while France's CAC 40 rose 1.6 percent. Gold fell $4, or 0.3 percent, to $1,194.60 an ounce and silver slid 17 cents, or 1.1 percent, to $15.28 an ounce. The yield on the 10-year Treasury slipped to 1.72 percent from 1.73 percent late Tuesday. Staples added 10 cents to $8.50.MEDIA MESS: Several big media companies slumped.

U.S. stocks were drifting between small gains and losses in late-afternoon trading Wednesday as investors weighed the implications of the Federal Reserve's latest signals on interest rates. In her semiannual report to Congress, Fed Chair Janet Yellen said the central bank would likely move more slowly to raise interest rates if the economy disappoints.

KEEPING SCORE: The Dow Jones industrial average rose one point to 16,015 as of 3:01 p.m. Eastern Time. The Standard & Poor's 500 gained 11 points, or 0.6 percent, to 1,863. The Nasdaq composite added 49 points, or 1.2 percent, to 4,317. Stocks are coming off a three-day losing streak.

THE FED SPEAKS: Yellen offered no major surprises in prepared remarks released before the start of her two-day Congressional testimony. She reiterated the Fed's confidence that the U.S. economy was on track for stronger growth and a rebound in inflation. At the same time, she acknowledged the weaker economic data reported since the start of the year and made it clear the Fed is closely monitoring greater risks from abroad. Since the Fed decided to raise its key interest rate from a record low in December, the U.S. economy has hit some turbulence and markets have become volatile.

THE QUOTE: The message from the Fed is what investors wanted to hear, said Erik Davidson, chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank.

"The markets have gotten the message that the Fed is not on autopilot," Davidson said. "If they'd gotten the sense that the Fed was on autopilot and was predestined to a certain number of rate hikes in 2016, that would have been troublesome."

SECTOR VIEW: Six of the 10 sectors in the S&P 500 index moved higher, led by health care stocks. Materials stocks were the biggest decliners.

GAINERS & LOSERS: Akamai Technologies surged 22.3 percent, the biggest gainer in the S&P 500 index. The stock added $8.84 to $48.41. Assurant fell the most. The stock lost $10.34, or 13.5 percent, to $66.09.

THEY SAID YES: Staples rose 1.2 percent after the retailer received European approval for its buyout of rival Office Depot. In exchange for the approval, Staples said it would split off some operations in Europe to allay regulatory concerns. The $6.3 billion deal still needs approval in Canada and in the U.S. Staples added 10 cents to $8.50.

MEDIA MESS: Several big media companies slumped. Disney dropped 3.3 percent a day after it reported that its ESPN network has hit a soft patch. The stock was the biggest decliner in the Dow, sliding $3.03 to $89.30. Time Warner was down 4 percent after its revenue fell short of forecasts. Time Warner shed $2.54 to $60.69.

OVERSEAS: In Europe, Germany's DAX added 1.6 percent, while France's CAC 40 rose 1.6 percent. Britain's FTSE 100 gained 0.7 percent. In Asia, Japan's Nikkei 225 sank 2.3 percent and is down about 11 percent in the past month. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 shed 1.2 percent. Markets were closed in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and South Korea for Lunar New Year holidays. Hong Kong and Korea reopen on Thursday and China and Taiwan resume trading on Monday.

ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude fell 49 cents, or 1.8 percent, to close at $27.45 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, a benchmark for international oils, rose 52 cents, or 1.7 percent, to close at $30.84 a barrel in London.

METALS: Precious metals prices closed lower. Gold fell $4, or 0.3 percent, to $1,194.60 an ounce and silver slid 17 cents, or 1.1 percent, to $15.28 an ounce. Copper, an industrial metal that will often rise and fall along with investor's optimism about the global economy, fell 1 cent, or 0.6 percent, to $2.03 a pound.

BONDS AND CURRENCIES: Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury slipped to 1.72 percent from 1.73 percent late Tuesday. The dollar fell to 113.80 yen from 114.95 yen, while the euro fell to $1.1274 from $1.1289 the day before.

The Denver Post
10/02
17 Points

Arts Review: 'Where to Invade Next' shows Michael Moore, the optimist

How you feel about "Where to Invade Next" will obviously be affected by how you feel about Moore. Contact Tony Hicks at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.TonyHicks or Twitter.com/tonyhicks67'Where to InVade Next' * * * Rating: R (language, violent images, drug use, brief nudity)Director: Michael MooreRunning time: 1 hour, 50 minutesOpens: Feb. The "Invade" of the title refers to the ideas of other countries that we should steal for our own benefit.

Despite its title, Michael Moore's new film "Where to Invade Next" might actually be his most optimistic yet.

It's not the angry, appalled, anti-war Michael Moore who went after George Bush for invading Iraq in "Fahrenheit 911" or who ambush-interviewed Hollywood icon and National Rifle Association President Charlton Heston in the Oscar-winning "Bowling for Columbine."

"Where to Invade Next" might sound like a snarky examination of America's imperialism and war history, but it's really a movie about change -- how positive change has taken root in other countries and how adopting their policies could help the United States.

The "Invade" of the title refers to the ideas of other countries that we should steal for our own benefit. Moore lays these out in a mostly light-hearted manner, even though there are some serious jaw-dropping moments. He especially succeeds when he is able to show, not just talk about, how other countries' so-called "liberal" ideas about health care, education, drugs, worker's rights, prisons, guns, child care and military spending are effective.

Right -- it's a lot to cover in an hour and 50 minutes.

As a result, there are times when more details or greater context would help Moore's cause. He purposely paints the big picture, as if concerned that too many details will bog down the film's lighter tone and leave viewers feeling they're being preached at and lectured to.

In his first film in more than five years, the writer-director visits Italy, France, Finland, Slovenia, Germany, Portugal, Norway, Tunisia and Iceland, cherry-picking ideas that seem to run various institutions better than we do. The cynical viewer will wonder what's being left out and what the downsides are to these seemingly inspiring approaches. But it helps Moore's film tremendously that he interviews heads of state and CEOs of corporations whose credentials are more than solid.

Moore casts himself as the curious everyman; there are no ambush interviews here. People are more than happy to share and demonstrate their ideas and show shock at how things are done in the United States. A group of French schoolchildren whose gourmet school lunches include scallops and lamb skewers, for example, react with horror when shown the slop their American contemporaries eat for lunch.

Moore takes the stars and stripes to Finland, showing a school system where kids speak multiple languages, score well on tests (there are no multiple choice exams), yet don't do homework and have shorter school days. School is government-funded, and paying private tuition is illegal, which Moore says eliminates social inequities in a educational system that is considered among the best in the world. In Slovenia, Moore goes directly to President Borut Pahor to get his assurance that college in the country is free (he also interviews American students who move to Slovenia for that very reason).

In Italy, higher-ups at the Ducati motorcycle company explain why more vacation time equates to happier workers who produce more and therefore make the company more money.

Moore darkens the mood later with criticism of U.S. history involving Native Americans and slavery and compares America's legacy on such issues to Germany's, which, Moore says, doesn't gloss over its ugly history.

Prison reform gets a good deal of air time. Moore visits Portugal, where police say drug use has been decriminalized for 15 years with great success because it's treated as a medical issue. Things then get a little strange in Norway, when Moore goes to a "prison," where inmates are treated like college kids in a dorm. In one funny/weird moment, Moore speaks with a convicted murderer while various long kitchen knives hang on the wall behind him.

Moore goes to Tunisia to show how, after rebels overthrew the government, peaceful negotiation with hard-line Islamic officials brought about more rights for women. In Iceland, Moore suggests the country has prospered since the 1970s, when a strike among women brought economic change and the country produced the world's first democratically elected female president in 1980.

Granted, in "Where to Invade Next," change seems too easy, and the simple suggestion that it can happen here omits many more factors than we could even mention. But as Moore cleverly points out, many of the ideas illustrated in the film actually originated in America.

How you feel about "Where to Invade Next" will obviously be affected by how you feel about Moore. Some will dismiss the documentary as Moore offering another far-too-rosy picture of progressive politics. But at the very least, "Invade" delivers a fascinating glimpse at how others deal with issues that have been vexing us for years.

Contact Tony Hicks at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.TonyHicks or Twitter.com/tonyhicks67

'Where to InVade Next'

* * *

Rating: R (language, violent images, drug use, brief nudity)

Director: Michael Moore

Running time: 1 hour,

50 minutes

Opens: Feb. 12 in limited release

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
14 Points
1

People Kanye West says that Bill Cosby is 'innocent'

Afterwards West apologized.After tweeting about Cosby on Tuesday, West did not continue discussing the matter, returning to the social media site approximately 30 minutes later and tweeting this:As of publish time, West has not said anything further on his Twitter account about Cosby. This appears to be the first instance West has spoken out on the subject.His tweet drew ire from fans and celebrities alike.This is not the first time West Twitter interactions have caused an uproar.

Kanye West is weighing in on the controversy surrounding Bill Cosby.

The artist, 38, took to Twitter on Tuesday to, without much context, declare that the embattled comedian is "innocent," rather emphatically.

It appears that West is referring to the current criminal charges against the 78 year-old comedian. At the end of December Cosby was formally charged in a suburb of Philadelphia for aggravated indecent assault stemming from a 2004 encounter with ex-Temple University employee Andrea Constand. Cosby's legal team filed a motion to dismiss the charges and after a two day hearing last week, Montgomery County Judge Steven O'Neill rejected the motion. The case is moving forward, and a preliminary hearing is scheduled for March 8, where the focus will be determining whether prosecutors have enough evidence to put Cosby on trial.

The charges against Cosby come after nearly 60 women have accused him of drugging and sexually assaulting them in episodes dating as far back as the 1960s. The Pennsylvania case is the first time criminal charges have been brought against him.

Since the allegations began to make national headlines in the fall of 2014, celebrities and public figures have both condemned and defended Cosby. This appears to be the first instance West has spoken out on the subject.

His tweet drew ire from fans and celebrities alike.

This is not the first time West Twitter interactions have caused an uproar. Just the other week an exchange between West and rapper Wiz Khalifa, which started with Khalifa questioning what was then the working title of West's still-not-officially-titled album, expected Thursday, and escalated to include jabs involving Amber Rose ? Khalifa's former wife and West's ex-girlfriend ? and her child with Khalifa, caused headlines. Afterwards West apologized.

After tweeting about Cosby on Tuesday, West did not continue discussing the matter, returning to the social media site approximately 30 minutes later and tweeting this:

As of publish time, West has not said anything further on his Twitter account about Cosby. USA TODAY has reached out to his representative for comment.

USA Today
10/02
11 Points

Arts 'Black Panthers' documentary film arrives on PBS

"I think when you see the film, it's obvious to any thinking person how it applies to what's going on today. ... The Black Panthers started because of the police brutality in Oakland, and it's very easy to make that connection to what's happening today.""The Black Panthers: Vanguards of the Revolution" will also be available on DVD and Blu-ray from PBS on Feb. The latter is known simply as James VIII on the show."American Idol" is in its 15th and final season.

Fifty years ago in Oakland, the Black Panther Party was formed amid turbulent times by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, mostly to stand up to outbreaks of police brutality. Over time, the group expanded its reach across the country, instituting numerous social programs and becoming what some consider to be the most influential black organization of its time.

"The Black Panthers: Vanguard of The Revolution" (9 p.m. Feb. 16, PBS) is the first feature-length documentary to explore the history of the party, its significance to the broader American culture, and the lessons learned from its demise.

Directed, produced and written by Stanley Nelson, the film had a theatrical run last year and is now coming to television for the first time as part of the "Independent Lens" documentary series.

Nelson, an Emmy-winning director who spent seven years making the film, blends rare archival footage with the voices of the people who were there: police officers, FBI informants, journalists, white supporters and detractors, along with Black Panthers who remained loyal to the party and those who left it.

Nelson appeared at the recent Television Critics Association Press Tour in Southern California and was asked what he hopes viewers take away from the film.

"If you're like me, you're sitting there with the clicker in your hand, so we want the film to be entertaining," he said. "Beyond that, the Panther story can be inspiring for people who want to make change. ... We're in the middle of young people forming their own movement today, and I think that there are obviously parallels that people will see in that."

But even though the nation continues to grapple with issues of police brutality, bigotry and social injustice, Stanley resisted the urge to weave contemporary history into his film.

"It's about the Black Panther Party from 1966 to '73," he said. "I think when you see the film, it's obvious to any thinking person how it applies to what's going on today. ... The Black Panthers started because of the police brutality in Oakland, and it's very easy to make that connection to what's happening today."

"The Black Panthers: Vanguards of the Revolution" will also be available on DVD and Blu-ray from PBS on Feb. 16.

A DOSE OF REALITY: Two East Bay vocalists made the cut last week when "American Idol" announced its Top 24.

Adam Lasher, 28, of Danville, became a finalist after Hollywood Week, as did James Dawson VIII, 23, of Orinda. The latter is known simply as James VIII on the show.

"American Idol" is in its 15th and final season. A California resident has never captured the title.

Meanwhile, as of this writing, Martinez resident Walter Welsh, 26, was still in solid contention on "Face Off," the special-effects makeup competition on the Syfy Channel.

Follow Chuck Barney at Twitter.com/chuckbarney and Facebook.com/bayareanewsgroup.chuckbarney.

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
8 Points

Arts Review: 'Deadpool' a dynamite superhero story, but for adults only

Leslie Uggams summons up some good laughs as Deadpool's blind roommate while T.J. The reason "Deadpool" is dynamite is because everyone is in on the joke: Deadpool -- known for his notoriously profane blabbermouth, katana swords and flip attitude -- ribs and riffs off the superhero template. While "Deadpool" heralds the arrival of a talented new director, its success belongs to Reynolds, who also served as a producer. Wade's world is upended when he learns he has terminal cancer.

Not another one. That might be the lackluster greeting for "Deadpool," the latest in a flood of comic book adaptations superpowering their way onto screens large and small.

But the raunchy R-rated comedy with an ever-game Ryan Reynolds as Marvel's irreverent mercenary is another showpiece in Marvel's impressive gallery of adult-oriented films and series that includes Netflix's riveting "Jessica Jones" and the intense "Daredevil."

But first, a word of advice to parents: This is not suitable material for kids.

The reason "Deadpool" is dynamite is because everyone is in on the joke: Deadpool -- known for his notoriously profane blabbermouth, katana swords and flip attitude -- ribs and riffs off the superhero template. He breaks through that so-called fourth wall, talking directly into the camera, and more often than not, it works. His jokester attitude fuels the film from its harried start to its blockbuster finale, with a post-credit scene worth sticking around for.

Establishing and then sustaining such a shoot-from-the-hip tone isn't easy. But in his feature-length directorial debut, Tim Miller deftly handles the mayhem and loopiness dreamed up in a quirky screenplay from "Zombieland's" Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick. Only now and then does the humor seem forced.

While "Deadpool" heralds the arrival of a talented new director, its success belongs to Reynolds, who also served as a producer. He is hilarious and sexy as Wade Wilson, a former Special Forces tough guy who takes on freelance gigs like scaring a pizza delivery boy who's harassing a young woman. Wade's world is upended when he learns he has terminal cancer. Shattered by the diagnosis, he accepts the evil Ajax's (Ed Skrein) dubious offer of a cure by receiving super powers that will enable him to heal. But transforming Wade into Deadpool is no act of altruism; the result of the torture he endures to get there is hellish and leaves Wade so heavily scarred, he has to wear a costume to hide his cringe-inducing face.

What's most surprising about "Deadpool" isn't that it it takes jabs at nearly everyone, including the studio that produced it, but the sweet and sultry romance that develops between Wade and a prostitute, Vanessa Carlysle (Morena Baccarin of Showtime's "Homeland"). The two have great chemistry, and a hot sex scene montage -- which is both playful and revealing -- is one of the film's more clever sequences.

Baccarin is a feisty presence and deserves notice for her performance here. Leslie Uggams summons up some good laughs as Deadpool's blind roommate while T.J. Miller (HBO's "Silicon Valley") brings a slyness to his barkeep at Sister Margaret's Home for Wayward Girls -- the watering hole where Wade hangs out with other toughies. Also getting into the zany spirit are Gina Carano as Angel Dust, Ajax's formidable heavy, and the two-person team of CGI-created X-Men mutant Colossus and his sort-of sidekick Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand).

While their contributions give the film some fizz, it's Reynold who pops the bubbly. His record in superhero movies may be spotty (let's try to forget his Hal Jordan in the boring "Green Lantern"), but he gives his all here for a character he first portrayed in "X-Men Origins: Wolverine." That one, too, was a dog but did find Reynolds achieving the unimaginable -- stealing a film from the talons of its magnetic lead, Hugh Jackman.

In "Deadpool," he owns the screen.

'deadpool'

* * *

Rating: R (strong violence and language throughout, sexual content and graphic nudity)

Cast: Ryan Reynolds, Morena Baccarin, Ed Skrein, T.J. Miller, Gina Carano, Leslie Uggams, Brianna Hildebrand

Director: TimMiller

Running time: 1 hour, 46 minutes

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
9 Points

Sports Carlos Santana to NFL: Super Bowl should have included classic NFL Bay Area acts

Carlos Santana didn't seem to a problem per se with Coldplay, Beyonce and Bruno Mars performing during Super Bowl 50's halftime show. "Real live music, real live vocals."Members of Journey agreed with Santana, sharing his post and adding, "Thank you, Carlos, and yes we would have all rocked it!"Martha Ross provides celebrity commentary for the Bay Area News Group. "This is just an invitation for you to consider iconic bands as part of your Half Time entertainment," he wrote.

Carlos Santana didn't seem to a problem per se with Coldplay, Beyonce and Bruno Mars performing during Super Bowl 50's halftime show. But he said the show would been truly amazing if it had included local iconic bands like Metallica, Steve Miller, Journey and "yours truly."

"We would have rocked the Half Time Show and done the SF Bay Area proud," the Latin guitar great posted on Facebook. He thanked CBS for allowing him to provide music for the telecast from Levi's Stadium, but he was disappointed he and other local, classic artists didn't have more of a role. Metallica performed Saturday night at AT&T Park.

"This is just an invitation for you to consider iconic bands as part of your Half Time entertainment," he wrote. "Real live music, real live vocals."

Members of Journey agreed with Santana, sharing his post and adding, "Thank you, Carlos, and yes we would have all rocked it!"

Martha Ross provides celebrity commentary for the Bay Area News Group. Follow her at twitter.com/marthajross.

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
9 Points

Sports Kristin Cavallari's brother, Michael, died of hypothermia

A Utah medical examiner has ruled that Michael Cavallari, the brother of Kristin Cavallari and brother-in-law of Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, died of hypothermia after he crashed his car while passing through a rocky, remote part of the state.Grand County Sheriff Steven White said the death was accidental, according to the New York Daily News. White said it's still not clear what events led Cavallari to end up in that area where he died.

A Utah medical examiner has ruled that Michael Cavallari, the brother of Kristin Cavallari and brother-in-law of Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, died of hypothermia after he crashed his car while passing through a rocky, remote part of the state.

Grand County Sheriff Steven White said the death was accidental, according to the New York Daily News.

Toxicology reports are still pending to show whether Michael Cavallari , 30, had any drugs in his system. White said it's still not clear what events led Cavallari to end up in that area where he died.

His body was found Dec. 20 at the bottom of a steep hillside, surrounded by boulders, two weeks after his abandoned car was found with the engine running and air bag deployed.

"I don't know if he thought he saw lights or something and started walking?" White said. "We just don't know."

Temperatures in the area were at or below freezing every night in the days after the car was found up against a small embankment.

Concerns about Cavallari, brother of the former "The Hills star, arose after his car was found on the remote road.

Friends and family were worried about his state of mind. Four days before he disappeared, he had been arrested for making criminal threats and having a gun, the Daily News reported.

Martha Ross provides celebrity commentary for the Bay Area News Group. Follow her at twitter.com/marthajross.

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
9 Points

Sports Watch Bernie Sanders shoot hoops; is taking on Warriors' Stephen Curry next?

Sanders took to the court with family members and showed off some nice glass work.

Sanders took to the court with family members and showed off some nice glass work. He pretty much is in the zone making shot after shot.

No word from the Warriors' camp so far, but who knows, maybe we'll see Sanders at Oracle Arena soon ready to take on Steph Curry.

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
9 Points

Sports Movin' on up: Keeping track of our former high school athletes

He had 12 points and 16 rebounds in a loss to the San Antonio Spurs and then 11 points and 13 rebounds and 12 points and 10 rebounds in back-to-back wins Sunday and Monday over the Atlanta Hawks. Aaron Gordon, Orlando Magic: Gordon, a second-year forward from Arizona who played his high school basketball at Archbishop Mitty, has had four double-doubles in his past six games since moving into the starting lineup. He started off his strong series of games with 19 points, 14 rebounds and five assists Jan.

Aaron Gordon, Orlando Magic: Gordon, a second-year forward from Arizona who played his high school basketball at Archbishop Mitty, has had four double-doubles in his past six games since moving into the starting lineup. He also has been selected to take part in the slam-dunk contest Saturday during all-star weekend in Toronto. He started off his strong series of games with 19 points, 14 rebounds and five assists Jan. 31 in a 119-114 victory over the Boston Celtics. He had 12 points and 16 rebounds in a loss to the San Antonio Spurs and then 11 points and 13 rebounds and 12 points and 10 rebounds in back-to-back wins Sunday and Monday over the Atlanta Hawks.

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
8 Points

Sports High school sports highlight reel: Top performances from last week

Nathan Beak, Pinewood basketball: He had six 3-pointers and finished with 40 points to propel Pinewood to a 72-58 victory over Menlo School in a West Bay Athletic League game.Austin Bice, Oak Grove basketball: The 6-foot-5 forward scored 25 points as Oak Grove outlasted Leigh 74-65 in overtime in a BVAL Mt.

Nathan Beak, Pinewood basketball: He had six 3-pointers and finished with 40 points to propel Pinewood to a 72-58 victory over Menlo School in a West Bay Athletic League game.

Austin Bice, Oak Grove basketball: The 6-foot-5 forward scored 25 points as Oak Grove outlasted Leigh 74-65 in overtime in a BVAL Mt. Hamilton Division game.

Will Chisholm, Menlo School soccer: The senior striker scored the winning goal in a 1-0 win over Sacred Heart Prep and had two goals and an assist in a 4-1 win over Harker.

Nandi Eskridge, Oceana basketball: She scored 16 points in a 69-41 win over Terra Nova and had 16 more in a 55-47 victory over El Camino.

Christian Futch, Gunderson basketball: In a BVAL Mt. Hamilton Division showdown, Futch had 28 points, 11 rebounds and three blocks to lead Gunderson past Leland 63-58.

Tahlia Garza, Archbishop Mitty basketball: She finished with 21 points to help lift Mitty past St. Francis 75-55 in West Catholic Athletic League play.

Natasha Harris, Mountain View soccer: She had a goal and an assist as Mountain View beat Palo Alto 2-0 in a matchup between the SCVAL De Anza Division's top teams.

Justin Hull, Palo Alto basketball: In his team's 54-44 victory over Fremont, Hull led the way with 22 points.

James Kelbert, Leland basketball: The senior scored 38 points as the Chargers edged Propsect 66-63 in a BVAL Mt. Hamilton Division game.

Jake Killingsworth, Serra basketball: The Columbia University-bound Killingsworth scored 25 points in a 64-58 win over Sacred Heart Cathedral.

AJ Macaraeg, Capuchino basketball: Macaraeg scored 14 points in a 50-48 win over Carlmont, then had 14 in a 45-44 win over Hillsdale.

Jacey Pederson, Palo Alto soccer: The reigning Mercury News player of the year had three goals to lead the Vikings to a 6-0 victory over Milpitas in an SCVAL De Anza Division game.

Makenna Pendleton, Archbishop Mitty soccer: In the Monarchs' 3-1 victory over Serra, Pendleton had two goals.

Jose Valencia, Leigh soccer: Valencia accounted for all of the scoring as the Longhorns beat rival Branham 2-0 in a BVAL Mt. Hamilton Division game.

Jake Wojcik, Bellarmine College Prep basketball: The sophomore scored 24 points as Bellarmine completed a season sweep of Mitty in West Catholic Athletic League play with a 52-51 victory in overtime.

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
8 Points

Sports San Mateo County girls athlete of the week: Kylie Metkiff, Terra Nova

Kylie Metkiff, Terra NovaSport: SoccerPosition: SweeperClass: SeniorIn addition to her strong contribution to two shutouts, Metkiff scored the only goal of the match in a 1-0 win over second-place San Mateo and had two assists in a 3-0 win over Mills as Terra Nova improved to 12-3-2 on the season and 9-0 in the PAL Ocean.

Kylie Metkiff, Terra Nova

Sport: Soccer

Position: Sweeper

Class: Senior

In addition to her strong contribution to two shutouts, Metkiff scored the only goal of the match in a 1-0 win over second-place San Mateo and had two assists in a 3-0 win over Mills as Terra Nova improved to 12-3-2 on the season and 9-0 in the PAL Ocean.

San Jose Mercury News
10/02
8 Points
1

Colorado lawmakers consider $100 million in mid-year budget cuts

a move that reduces the education shortfall known as the "negative factor" by $24 million down to $831 million.Colorado school districts wanted to keep the extra state spending, but lawmakers held back given projections for another tight budget year that starts in July.Rep. and represent a recent departure for the usual midyear budget adjustments."We are saving money this year," said Rep.

Faced with a significant budget shortfall, state lawmakers are poised to cut roughly $100 million from the current state budget and pull $60 million from reserves as part of a package of spending bills introduced this week.

The spending cuts are driven by a slowdown in the state's economic growth ? led in part by tanking oil prices ? and represent a recent departure for the usual midyear budget adjustments.

"We are saving money this year," said Rep. Bob Rankin, a Republican budget writer. "That's highly unusual. We are usually bumping way up."

The 18 spending bills will arrive in the Democratic-controlled House for debate Wednesday before moving to the Republican-led Senate for final approval next week.

The budget deficit is estimated to be more than $200 million in legislative economic forecasts, but lawmakers adopted the governor's office projection that pegged the shortfall at $160 million.

What made the balancing act easier is a lower-than-expected student enrollment count and higher-than-expected local property taxes that reduced the state-share of the school budget by $134 million.

The scenario allowed lawmakers to increase per pupil spending in the current year by $18 to $7,294 ? a move that reduces the education shortfall known as the "negative factor" by $24 million down to $831 million.

Colorado school districts wanted to keep the extra state spending, but lawmakers held back given projections for another tight budget year that starts in July.

Rep. Millie Hamner, a Dillon Democrat and the top budget writer, said banking the money will help lawmakers work to keep negative the factor flat next year.

"We've pretty much tucked it away," she said.

An additional $4 million in spending cuts are possible because of lower inmate projections for state prisons and youth corrections and cuts in court building costs, among other reductions.

The budget bills include new spending items, however, including an additional $12 million in state dollars for an increase in Medicaid case loads.

Other smaller-dollar earmarks include $1 million from marijuana taxes for additional pesticide testing; $1.5 million in discretionary spending for the state prison in Limon, where inmates were able to disable the cell locks; and $2.7 million for court-ordered competency evaluations for prison inmates.

John Frank: 303-954-2409, [email protected] or @ByJohnFrank

The Denver Post
10/02
18 Points
1

Phil Jackson failed with ‘His Guy’ Derek Fisher and now needs to find ‘Best Guy’ to save the Knicks 

Richard Harbus/for New York Daily News Knicks president Phil Jackson needs to hire best coach for the job, not another one of 'his' guys. But to Jackson, Fisher was one of His Guys, out of the cult of the triangle, and Phil.A LOOK AT POTENTIAL CANDIDATES TO BECOME KNICKS COACH Brandon Dill/AP The Knicks fire Derek Fisher on Monday. On the day Jackson fired his first coach, and one of His Guys, as coach, Jackson's record as a Knicks' executive was 40-96, same as Fisher's.
Richard Harbus/for New York Daily News Knicks president Phil Jackson needs to hire best coach for the job, not another one of 'his' guys.

This is what an NBA coach said on the telephone the day the Knicks paid Phil Jackson $60 million to restore the team to its old glory, because of Phil's glory days coaching the Bulls and Lakers:

"It's going to be a big bamboozle."

By the way? The comment was made by a man who has tremendous respect for the work that Phil did with the Bulls and the Lakers, when he was running a triangle offense that is gangbusters when you can finally throw the ball to one of the ten best players of all time.

ISOLA: PHIL JACKSON NEEDS TO THINK OF COACH OUTSIDE TRIANGLE

Now the Knicks have fired another coach, the way they have fired coaches left and right over a 15-year period when they have won exactly one Atlantic Division title and one playoff series and made the playoffs three times. And while Jackson is now conducting coaching tutorials on social media before he officially begins his search for a new coach, it means the Knicks start all over again, not even 150 games into the Jackson years, which are making Mike Woodson's years coaching the Knicks feel like glory days.

"They hired one of the greatest coaches in history NOT to coach," the same guy said to me Tuesday. "And let me get this straight: He doesn't have the energy to coach his team, but he does to basically be president and general manager?"

Give Jackson all the credit for bringing Kristaps Porzingis to New York and to the Garden, because the Latvian kid may turn out to be a transformative player. The kid fell into his lap at No. 4 in the draft, and Jackson finally decided not to trade the pick, and he had the guts to make the call, and good for him.

Other than that, Jackson hired somebody ? Fisher ? who clearly wasn't ready to be a head coach in the NBA, and might never be. Not only did he do that, but he paid Fisher $25 million to get on-the-job training with the Knicks. But to Jackson, Fisher was one of His Guys, out of the cult of the triangle, and Phil.

A LOOK AT POTENTIAL CANDIDATES TO BECOME KNICKS COACH

Brandon Dill/AP The Knicks fire Derek Fisher on Monday.

ISOLA: JACKSON FIRING FISHER A LOSS, THIBODEAU WOULD BE WIN

Steve Kerr, who showed you how smart about basketball he was, had turned Jackson down so he could go coach Steph Curry and a championship team in Oakland. Kerr was also one of Phil's Guys. And don't compare him to Fisher, because Kerr had spent time running the Suns before he became an NBA coach.

So Fisher is gone. Kurt Rambis, another of Phil's Guys, is the interim coach. And Phil tells Knicks fans on Monday that here is what he's looking for in the next coach of the Knicks: "Someone?to match the style of the way we do things."

As if there is now some Knicks' way of doing things. As if we are witnessing some sort of culture change. We aren't. The Knicks keep losing, and try to rebuild with Porzingis, some solid second-unit players, and a first-unit that has three guys over the age of 30 on it.

You want to know one of the reasons why Fisher is gone? Because he actually started questioning Jackson, who occasionally sounds like someone longing for the days of the VHS and eight-track players as he talks about the triangle, which might work like gangbusters here if he still had the young Michael Jordan or the young Kobe Bryant flourishing in it, the way they would have flourished in the picket-fence play that Hickory High ran in "Hoosiers."

You know how people figure this out, whether they're still showing big loyalty to the Knicks and still paying big money to show up at the Garden: By watching the games. And wondering why we're still even talking about the triangle, instead of talking about finding the best available coach to come here and coach to the talent in the room, which is what Red Holzman, Jackson's mentor, once did.

PHIL JACKSON'S COACHING TREE FILLED WITH ROTTEN BRANCHES

Al Bello/Getty Images Knicks interim head coach Kurt Rambis and Kristaps Porzingis.

Oh, and Knicks fans probably wonder something else about Phil Jackson: Whether he is about to become part of the revolving door of executives and coaches with the Knicks. On the day Jackson fired his first coach, and one of His Guys, as coach, Jackson's record as a Knicks' executive was 40-96, same as Fisher's. Isiah Thomas' record as general manager, over his first 136 games, was 62-74.

You go back to the wisdom of the late, great George Young, who was a great sports executive with the Giants, on this: It's time for the guru to start guru-ing. Or at least start Zen mastering.

When Porzingis turned out to be such a find, and such a talent, it was fair to think that the Knicks' luck had turned. But has it, as they are about to burn through another year of Carmelo Anthony's prime? Take a look at the Celtics' roster and their starting five and ask yourself if you think they're loaded. But they are nearly 10 games better than the Knicks in the standings, because Danny Ainge didn't go hire one of His Guys to coach the team, someone who had to embrace Celtic Pride, he just went and got Brad Stevens from Butler, who might be the best coach on the planet right now.

The Knicks need to win some games the rest of the way, and make a run at the playoffs, if Knicks fans are supposed to buy into the cult of Phil. Then Jackson doesn't need to hire another one of His Guys. Just the best guy. Or Knicks' fans will think this is the big bamboozle after all. The record that got Derek Fisher fired? Phil Jackson has the same one.

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Related Stories Phil Jackson goes on textbook-like ramble about Knicks Knicks Insider: Melo and Porzingis staying put, says Phil Matt Barnes looks to clothes the door on Instagram post A look at how past Knicks head coaches fared in their debuts Tags: phil jackson , derek fisher , new york knicks , nba
Daily News
10/02
18 Points
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