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Kate Upton confirms her nude photos were leaked as more celebrities join outcry

Previous Next Enlarge The stars are striking back against the leaker who allegedly shared nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities.Blond bombshell Kate Upton was the latest to confirm that she was included in the nude photo leak of dozens of celebrities . vowing through a spokesman to prosecute those who released or shared the racy pics."This is obviously an outrageous violation of our client Kate Upton's privacy," attorney Lawrence Shire told Us Weekly.
Hannes Magerstaedt/Getty Images An attorney for Kate Upton (above) called the leak an 'outrageous violation.'Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic A representative for Jennifer Lawrence (above) confirmed that nude photos of the actress were leaked.Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images Actress Selena Gomez's nude photographs were leaked in a major breech Sunday. Previous Next Enlarge

The stars are striking back against the leaker who allegedly shared nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities.

Blond bombshell Kate Upton was the latest to confirm that she was included in the nude photo leak of dozens of celebrities ? apparently including Kirsten Dunst, Selena Gomez, and Kim Kardashian ? vowing through a spokesman to prosecute those who released or shared the racy pics.

"This is obviously an outrageous violation of our client Kate Upton's privacy," attorney Lawrence Shire told Us Weekly. "We intend to pursue anyone disseminating or duplicating these illegally obtained images to the fullest extent possible."

A representative for Jennifer Lawrence called the violation of the star's privacy "flagrant" in a statement.

"The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos of Jennifer Lawrence,” it said. A spokeswoman from the FBI declined to say whether the agency was investigating, though it has looked into previous celebrity leaks.

The breach could be linked to an alleged flaw in Apple's "Find my iPhone" app, according to The Next Web. The app allows users multiple login attempts without getting locked out after a certain amount of wrong tries, potentially allowing hacker programs that repeatedly try different passwords to access another person's iCloud account.

Rabbani and Solimene Photography/Getty Images Kirsten Dunst is apparently among the celebrities whose nude pictures were hacked.

Earlier on Monday, Ricky Gervais took heat for a comment that appeared to place some of the blame on the victims of the breach.

"Celebrities, make it harder for hackers to get nude pics of you from your computer by not putting nude pics of yourself on your computer," read a tweet sent from his account on Monday afternoon.

But many took to the Internet to defend the disrobed stars, arguing that the "victim-blaming" was similar to the way victims of sexual assaults and rape have historically been blamed.

"Seriously, do not forget that the person who stole these pictures and leaked them is not a hacker: they're a sex offender," Lena Dunham tweeted on Monday. "The 'don't take naked pics if you don't want them online' argument is the 'she was wearing a short skirt' of the web. Ugh," she later wrote.

Gervais' Tweet was later deleted.

A list pulled from social media that has URLs of where the images can be seen. Celebrities have come out saying searching for the nude photos makes Internet users complicit in the crime.

Many took aim at those who shared the pics, such as celebrity blogger Perez Hilton, who had published some of the uncensored photos on his blog, before removing them and apologizing.

"Sharing these images is?an act of sexual violation, and it deserves the same social and legal punishment as meted out to stalkers and other sexual predators," wrote columnist Van Badham for The Guardian.

And others laid blame on those who looked at the pictures.

"Searching out these images is to be complicit in the crime," wrote Lucy Hunter Johnston for the Independent. "The way in which we share our bodies must be a choice."

With News Wire Services

[email protected]

Related Stories Stars bashed on Twitter after nude photo leak How to keep your iCloud photos safe Jennifer Lawrence, other celebrities have nude photos leaked on Internet
Daily News
Today
20 Points

World War II: 75th anniversary

German troops march through occupied Warsaw, Poland, during World War II, circa 1939. Denmark, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway and Belgium soon came under German control, and when France fell less than a year later, Britain was the only nation left in Western Europe to oppose Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.

German troops march through occupied Warsaw, Poland, during World War II, circa 1939. September 1 marks the 75th anniversary of the start of World War II. In 1939, Germany invaded Poland. Denmark, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway and Belgium soon came under German control, and when France fell less than a year later, Britain was the only nation left in Western Europe to oppose Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. Click through for key photos from the war.

CNN
Today
19 Points
1

Who's at fault over J-Law's nude photo hack?

It's the perpetrator.Read CNNOpinion's new Flipboard magazine.Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.Join us on Facebook.com/CNNOpinion. Nor is it to insist that women stop taking nude photos of themselves or, for that matter, stop engaging in any activity they wouldn't want to be made public. A representative for Lawrence confirmed in an email to Buzzfeed that the images were stolen from the actress' iCloud account."This is a flagrant violation of privacy," the representative said.

Editor's note: Peggy Drexler is the author of "Our Fathers, Ourselves: Daughters, Fathers and the Changing American Family" and "Raising Boys Without Men." She is an assistant professor of psychology at Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University and a former gender scholar at Stanford University. Join her on Facebook and follow her on Twitter @drpeggydrexler. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

(CNN) -- The latest nude celebrity photo leak is yet another case of how the Internet often lets people do whatever they want to whomever they want.

On Sunday, a user of anonymous Internet message board 4chan posted hundreds of nude photos of some of Hollywood's biggest celebrities, including actress Jennifer Lawrence and model Kate Upton. The poster claimed photos of Victoria Justice and Ariana Grande were included, but the singer/actresses deny that the photos are real.

Representatives and the women themselves have begun issuing their denials (in the case of Justice and Grande) and confirmations (in the case of Lawrence and Upton). A representative for Lawrence confirmed in an email to Buzzfeed that the images were stolen from the actress' iCloud account.

"This is a flagrant violation of privacy," the representative said. "The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos of Jennifer Lawrence."

Of course, what happened here is more than a violation of privacy; it's flat-out criminal invasion. Prosecution, however, may be something of a long shot. Although a Florida man responsible for breaking into the private email accounts of more than 50 celebs and posting many explicit photos online is serving 10 years in prison, the law is only just beginning to catch up to the problem of what is broadly referred to as "revenge porn," or the unauthorized posting of explicit content without the consent of the individual.

Most websites that host these photos are protected by a federal law that absolves them of responsibility for material posted by third parties. It's legal in most of the United States, and only a few states -- about 12 -- have laws that make posting on such sites a crime ... if you can even find out who the poster is.

Prosecuting depends on first determining who uploaded the photo and where the photo originated. A California law, for example, did not, until just last week, protect victims who took the photos themselves.

These unclear, largely ineffectual laws have in turn encouraged a culture of victim-blaming, which we're seeing here in full force. Consider that the biggest headlines haven't been along the lines of "How can someone can do this and get away with it?" but a debate over who bears greater blame: Apple's iCloud or the women themselves.

Certainly, the surest way to avoid ever having your most private photos shared publicly is to not take them in the first place. This is the philosophy behind the most common advice given to teens, among whom the rates of "sexting" continue to rise. Trust no one. Share nothing. Even better: Take nothing.

While we're at it: Don't leave the house. After all, you could get mugged, or raped. You'd better not fly on a jet, either, what with all the terrorism and overworked pilots. Swim in the ocean? No way: sharks!

It's ridiculous logic.

And yet much of the reaction to the celebrity leak has fallen prey to such logic, questioning why these celebrities would take such risqué?and risky?photos in the first place. For this reason, taking nude photos is most definitely a right to fight for, if only because ceasing to do so is a form of victim blaming, and far more harmful than protective.

The blame for a crime lies not with the victim but with the criminal. Jennifer Lawrence was not naïve, or tacky, or any number of criticisms that have been and surely will be lobbed at her, for posing for provocative photos. She was a normal young woman. And I suspect that we're more shocked by the fact that Lawrence had a glass of wine and posed naked for a boyfriend than the fact the image is now ours to see. We've become accustomed to knowing everything about everyone.

Actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead, one of the victims, received responses to her tweet, "To those of you looking at photos I took with my husband years ago in the privacy of our home, hope you feel great about yourselves," that echoed this sentiment: "?@M_E_Winstead Stop posing nude on camera, dummy. Your husband not know what you look like nude? ?#LessonLearned." She has since gone silent on Twitter.

The message, of course, isn't that it's heinous to so publicly and maliciously invade someone's privacy but that these women brought their misfortune on themselves. After all, it wouldn't have happened to them if they didn't take the photos.

But the first step to protecting our privacy both online and off isn't to demand that Apple make a stronger iCloud or to start stripping our storage spaces of anything private. Nor is it to insist that women stop taking nude photos of themselves or, for that matter, stop engaging in any activity they wouldn't want to be made public. Instead, it's to take these crimes seriously and hold their executors accountable. The problem isn't the picture. It's the perpetrator.

Read CNNOpinion's new Flipboard magazine.

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook.com/CNNOpinion.

CNN
Today
16 Points
1

Joan Rivers' daughter: 'Fingers crossed' on comedian's recovery

"Then she mimicked people talking about what it was like to see her drop dead on stage."Rivers was in fine form, he said. "We're gonna do jokes and be up until we know. That's how I deal with things. I'm not just gonna sit around the next couple of days and go crazy."Rivers has been open about her health issues.

(CNN) -- The latest statement from Joan Rivers' daughter gave no new information about the comedian's condition three days after she was rushed to a New York hospital.

"Thank you for your continued love and support," Melissa Rivers said Sunday. "We are keeping our fingers crossed."

Rivers, 81, stopped breathing during throat surgery at a Manhattan medical clinic Thursday morning, according to the New York Fire Department. She apparently suffered cardiac and respiratory arrest during a procedure.

She was listed in critical condition in New York's Mount Sinai Hospital, where paramedics took her by ambulance.

Her daughter's initial statement, made public late Thursday when she arrived at the hospital after a flight from Los Angeles, said her mother was "resting comfortably."

Her next statement Friday also gave little indication of Rivers' prognosis.

"Her condition remains serious, but she is receiving the best treatment and care possible. We ask that you continue to keep her in your thoughts as we pray for her recovery."

Rivers' was undergoing an apparently minor elective procedure at the clinic, which is about a mile away from the hospital where she was taken.

She had been scheduled to perform her comedy act at the Count Basie Theater in Red Bank, New Jersey, the next night.

Michael Lucas, who was in the audience for Rivers' show at New York's Laurie Beechman Theatre on Wednesday night, told CNN that she joked about death.

"She said, 'You know I'm 81 years old, and I could drop dead at any moment and you would be so lucky because you will have a story to tell your friends for the rest of your life,'" Lucas said. "Then she mimicked people talking about what it was like to see her drop dead on stage."

Rivers was in fine form, he said. "There was no sign (Wednesday) night that she was declining. Her show was over an hour long and she never stumbled or even paused to catch her breath."

In 2013, Rivers allowed cameras to record a health scare for her and her daughter's reality show, "Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best?"

Rivers said on the show that doctors found a spot on an X-ray after she had a persistent cough.

"We're just not going to be sad about this," Joan Rivers said during the episode. "We're gonna do jokes and be up until we know. That's how I deal with things. I'm not just gonna sit around the next couple of days and go crazy."

Rivers has been open about her health issues. She was diagnosed with osteoporosis in 2002 after a fall down some stairs left her with broken bones, and she became an advocate for screenings for women.

She also admitted to not being as healthy as she could be.

"I try not to be, but I'm a terrible eater," she said. "I wish I could say I eat super-healthy, but I don't. I love junk food -- it should be its own food group -- so I help my bones with supplements and medicine."

Joan Rivers 'stands behind' Gaza quotes

CNN's Doug Ganley contributed to this report.

CNN
Today
16 Points
1

Funerals, ghost towns and haunted health workers: Life in the Ebola zone

"We must do everything we can to kick Ebola out of our country."Staying at home or running away from Ebola is not a solution, so we have to face it. To get it to zero."READ MORE: Ebola death toll passes 1,550, outbreak worsensREAD MORE: Ebola: Nine things to know about the diseaseREAD MORE: Ebola: Your biggest questions answered. Zango Town, Liberia (CNN) -- At the gravesite in a northern Liberia village, there are no religious or traditional burial rites.

Zango Town, Liberia (CNN) -- At the gravesite in a northern Liberia village, there are no religious or traditional burial rites. No ceremony, no mourning, no family members, and no final goodbyes.

Nothing but a group of men dressed in space-suit-like outfits, cautiously throwing the dead body into the grave, they pause only to toss in anything else they are wearing that came into contact with the deceased.

These men are part of the country's Ebola response team, specifically tasked with burying anyone suspected to have died of the Ebola virus.

The virus is spread through contact with the blood and body fluids of people infected with Ebola, and it is still transferable even from a dead body.

To help combat the spread of the disease, the Liberian government has directed that its citizens should not bury anyone who dies of, or is suspected of having been infected with, Ebola.

For months Liberians ignored the directive, fearing that they would be ostracized by their communities if they admitted that their relatives had died of Ebola, but here in Lofa County -- ground zero of the country's outbreak -- almost everyone has witnessed the devastating suffering and numerous deaths caused by the virus.

Now almost anytime there is a suspected Ebola death in the community, they call in the Ebola response team to come and bury the body safely.

Safe burials

"When it started, it wasn't that easy," says Alpha Tamba, an Ebola response coordinator in Lofa County. "It was kind of difficult for communities to disclose death. People preferred driving us away."

"We must be grateful for the communities, through the efforts of the local leaders. Now they are disclosing death to us," he explains.

Today, the team has been called to a village where a woman has died of unknown causes. It may not have been from the deadly virus, but the villagers are not taking any chances.

The Lofa County health team arrives carrying gloves, gowns, goggles and diluted bleach. They suit up: from head to toe, no skin is exposed. On their hands they wear three layers of gloves, securing the edges with clear tape at the wrists.

Before they enter the house to collect the body, one of them goes in and sprays the house with bleach. Then -- and only then -- can the rest of the team enter to place the body in an airtight polythene bag, ready for burial.

Wailing rents the air as the burial team walks out of the house carrying the body on a stretcher. Some of those crying are the dead woman's family members; for their own safety, they can only mourn from a distance.

Town abandoned

A few kilometres away from the village is Zango Town: most of the houses here have been abandoned, their doors padlocked and windows shuttered.

Some of the residents abandoned the town in such a hurry that their clothes and floor mats have been left hanging on clotheslines.

Kazalee Johnson, a community worker, tells CNN the empty houses belong to people who either died of Ebola or those who fled in terror, for fear of contracting the virus.

Johnson says he lost his 8-months-pregnant sister, his brother, niece and many, many others: too many to name.

"They died. They died," he says. "So many people die -- the houses on your right and even the houses on your left. They are all gone," says Johnson.

It's hard to imagine another area in Lofa county that has been harder hit than this one.

But then there's Barkedu Town -- of the 1,000 or so Ebola-related deaths in Liberia, 20% of the victims have died in this single town.

Quarantine zone

Home to more than 8,000 people, Barkedu is now under quarantine: no one can go in, and no one can go out.

The toll of the isolation is weighing heavily on the community.

"From the time we started receiving death from Ebola -- every activity cease," says Musa Sessay, the town's chief. "Because we do farm here and now there's been no farming."

"We need food, we really need medicine. But the most important one is medicine because the hospital is closed down, there is no health worker," he says.

This is what life is like across Lofa: The people are locked in, afraid and alone.

And not even the health workers are spared the ravaging effects of Ebola.

Sometimes when they are called in to investigate a case, they get there only to discover the victim is one of their own.

Ebola nightmares

One of the local clinics had to be locked up after all the healthcare workers based there contracted the virus. Only one survived.

"It is very heartbreaking. You are working for the team at the front and you see them lying down. Day by day, they are dying," says Tamba, who admits the harrowing work he does has caused him nightmares.

"Sometimes we go to bed and we dream of nothing else but Ebola, Ebola, Ebola -- nothing else," he explains. "Several times I dream I become infected, I see myself in the case management center."

But he says that amid all the bad news, he is beginning to hear happier tidings: an increasing number of Ebola survivors, people who initially tested positive for the virus but -- because they reported it early and because of the medical teams' efforts -- later recovered.

These positive outcomes keep Tamba hopeful as he and other health workers continue to tirelessly explain to the community how to prevent infection.

"It is difficult to stand in front of Ebola, but this is the situation we have," he says. "We must do everything we can to kick Ebola out of our country.

"Staying at home or running away from Ebola is not a solution, so we have to face it. We have to fight it. To get it to zero."

READ MORE: Ebola death toll passes 1,550, outbreak worsensREAD MORE: Ebola: Nine things to know about the diseaseREAD MORE: Ebola: Your biggest questions answered

CNN
Today
16 Points
1

Peanut butter killed his mom; now son watches company brass stand trial

In the case of raw peanuts, salmonella is destroyed by roasting at 350 degrees.Once ingested, salmonella can take many days to manifest in a person's body. salmonella outbreak has already led to new federal food safety regulations. often shipped products before testing for salmonella was completed. It was the first time he'd seen a salmonella positive result."I'd never had one before," he said on the stand. They pleaded guilty in June but have not yet been sentenced.The Peanut Corp.

Albany, Georgia (CNN) -- It was in a bland, windowless third-floor courtroom here that Jeff Almer first locked eyes with the man he holds responsible for his mother's death.

Shirley Mae Almer, 72, survived lung cancer and a brain tumor. But not peanut butter.

One of America's favorite foods -- tainted with salmonella -- killed her, just four days before Christmas in 2008.

Her grief-stricken son opened the presents she'd left for him under the tree: a shirt and a GPS device. He's thankful now that he can't quite remember which shirt it was. He doesn't want to be reminded.

His mother's death spurred Almer to become a public face for the fight for tougher food safety regulations. Now, he awaits justice.

The salmonella-laced product Shirley Almer consumed was traced back to peanuts produced at Peanut Corp. of America, a plant in the "Peanut Proud" town of Blakely, Georgia.

Stewart Parnell, the man who owned and ran Peanut Corp., is facing prosecution in an unprecedented criminal trial in Albany, about an hour's drive from the now boarded-up plant.

It felt surreal for Almer to gaze into Parnell's eyes as the trial began in early August. He is sure in his heart that Parnell deliberately ordered the shipment of peanut butter and paste he knew carried the potentially deadly bacteria.

The Peanut Corp. salmonella outbreak has already led to new federal food safety regulations. It's a big reason why Americans should feel safer about tainted food being pulled off grocery shelves more quickly, like the salmonella contaminated nut butters that were recalled this week.

Now, the trial has the potential to make the outbreak the most influential food-borne illness incident in America. Never before has a jury heard a criminal case in which a corporate chief faced federal criminal charges for knowingly shipping out food containing salmonella. No matter the outcome of the trial, about to enter a fifth week, it is sure to make a lasting impact on how criminal statutes are applied to food safety, advocates say.

Almer recently sat on one of several hard wooden benches at the back of the courtroom. He could see the 12-member jury and six alternates seated on the right side of the court. Even with the air conditioning on, some fanned themselves to stay cool.

On the other side, he had a clear view of Parnell and his younger brother Michael Parnell, who are on trial together after being indicted on 76 counts, among them conspiracy, mail fraud, wire fraud and the introduction of adulterated and misbranded food into interstate commerce with intent to defraud or mislead. The fraud and conspiracy charges each carry a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

Stewart Parnell also faces obstruction of justice charges, as does former plant quality assurance manager Mary Wilkerson, who sat with her attorney next to Michael Parnell.

The government says the Parnell brothers and Wilkerson put profit before safety. They knew about the salmonella in their products, prosecutors say, and covered up lab results that tested positive for the bacteria.

In all, nine people died nationwide; another 714 people in 46 states were sickened, some critically. It was the deadliest outbreak of its kind in recent years.

The prosecution's blistering opening statement contained three now-infamous words Parnell penned in a March 2007 email to a plant manager about contaminated products: "Just ship it."

Defense attorneys argue that Parnell did not know about mismanagement at the plant, that he was the fall guy for other employees' wrongdoing.

But Almer doesn't see it that way.

"This man had an opportunity to come clean, but I've never seen anything but tap dancing around the issue," Almer said. He'd watched Parnell take the Fifth Amendment to avoid testifying before a congressional committee a few weeks after federal food inspectors raided the plant.

Almer longs for the end of the trial. Yet, he said, he and his brothers and sisters needed it so they could go on with their lives. It seemed like everything came undone after their mom died. She was the glue of the family, the one with "sisu," they like to say -- the Finnish word for spunk and fortitude.

People think salmonella is something that gives you a stomachache, Almer said. "It killed my mother."

As he settled into his seat at the trial, his girlfriend by his side, he knew it would be tough to hear it all play out again, to relive the tragedy that struck his family in Minnesota and the nightmare winter for all of America when a popular paste turned national foe.

Peanuts, pride and a black eye

Shirley Mae Almer contracted a urinary tract infection around Thanksgiving 2008 and checked into the Good Samaritan, a short-term care facility in Brainerd, Minnesota.

Her daughter Ginger Lorentz came to visit Almer and made her toast slathered with peanut butter from the facility's kitchen.

Almer fell ill with stomach cramps and diarrhea. Everything spiraled downward from there. Instead of releasing her as planned on the Monday before Christmas, doctors gave her just a few hours to live.

Jeff Almer arrived at his mother's bedside just in time to say goodbye. He wouldn't learn the cause of her illness until many days after she was buried. She had been infected by salmonella.

The microscopic rod-shaped bacteria is most commonly associated with meat, poultry, eggs and raw milk -- products from animals that are carriers of the bacteria. It can also be found on fruits and vegetables and in ingredients made from them.

Salmonella is America's most common cause of food-borne illness and sickens up to 1.4 million people each year. The key to destroying it is to wash raw foods thoroughly or cook other foods at high enough temperatures to kill the bacteria. In the case of raw peanuts, salmonella is destroyed by roasting at 350 degrees.

Once ingested, salmonella can take many days to manifest in a person's body. Most people are able to fight it off, but it can turn into a killer, especially in those who are vulnerable: the very young, the old and the frail. That was the case with Shirley Almer.

"My mother was trying to gain her balance, and their product pushed her over the edge," Jeff Almer said. "They stole that from us."

About two weeks after Shirley Almer's death, health officials traced the source of the salmonella back to peanut butter produced at the Peanut Corp. plant. They descended on Blakely, as did the media.

Longtime employees told reporters they wilted under the pressure to produce for Stewart Parnell. The Lynchburg, Virginia, man, they said, bought the plant in 2001 in order to profit from an iconic industry; Georgia is the nation's top peanut producer.

Employees described a filthy facility where Parnell increased production manifold and enticed food giants like Kellogg Co. and Sara Lee to buy from Peanut Corp.

Annual sales jumped 66%, from $15 million in 2005 to $25 million in 2008, the last full year Peanut Corp. was in production, according to business researchers Dun & Bradstreet.

Federal inspectors found roaches, rats, mold, dirt, bird droppings and accumulated grease in the plant when they raided it in January 2009. They also found a leaky roof.

Salmonella thrives in the intestines of birds. And the presence of water in what is supposed to be a dry processing facility for peanuts is like adding gasoline to fire for salmonella, say food safety experts. Inspectors also found that the peanut roasting temperatures were not always hot enough to kill salmonella.

Health officials discovered similarly poor conditions at Peanut Corp.'s other plant in Plainview, Texas, and both facilities were shuttered. The company later filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

The shell of the building in Georgia still sits on Highway 62, a few miles from the center of Blakely. It's like a ghost haunting the town.

Jeff Almer drove by the place that produced the peanut butter his mother so loved. The signs are overgrown with moss and weeds. It's hard to even imagine it as a thriving peanut factory.

Residents of Blakely said they don't like talking about what happened there. People lost jobs, and peanut farmers worried that the salmonella outbreak had scared Americans away from peanuts.

But peanuts have held their own in Georgia, which produces half the nation's crop. "Peanut Proud," say the banners that flutter from light posts around the central square. A 1954 monument in front of the courthouse praises peanuts for bringing prosperity to Early County. And during harvest, the air around the fields thick with peanut crops smells like a freshly opened jar of the creamy stuff.

Still, Blakely hasn't shaken off the tragedy that forever linked its name with suffering and death.

"It was a huge black eye for our community," said Anthony Howard, a local bank executive who became mayor in 2011, two years after the scandal. "How do you get over something like that? I'm surprised the Parnell brothers didn't plead out."

Howard said the Parnell brothers tried to sell the property but no one wanted to touch it. One resident told him the town should just tear the plant down.

Almer's girlfriend took a series of pictures of him in front of the place. He made certain salutes, signs and expressions that he said were too lewd to print.

It was almost cathartic to stand there. It was something else he needed to do.

'Turn them loose'

"Exciting day, right?" joked Stewart Parnell's defense attorney, Tom Bondurant, after court adjourned one day in the third week of the trial.

The prosecution's strategy involved so many documents that on some days, like this one, the proceedings got downright tedious.

Prosecutor Patrick Hearn had shown the jury document after document: shipping orders from Peanut Corp. to its clients, quality assurance reports, email exchanges describing plant problems, and bacteria test results from J. Leek and Associates and Deibel Labs, two facilities the plant used to test products.

Hearn argued the documents showed that Peanut Corp. often shipped products before testing for salmonella was completed. Other times, Hearn said, Peanut Corp. misled clients like Kellogg on bacteria testing results or covered up positive salmonella tests.

Kellogg recalled its peanut butter products once the salmonella was traced to Peanut Corp. and later, Kellogg President David Mackay testified before Congress that the company was not aware of health problems at Peanut Corp.

In 2010, Kellogg and Peanut Corp. paid out a $12 million settlement in a class action lawsuit brought by salmonella victims.

Hearn posed questions about Kellogg and other clients to Samuel Lightsey, a former plant manager who was initially named in the federal indictment with another manager, Danny Kilgore.

Kilgore and Lightsey both pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with the government in exchange for leniency.

Kilgore managed the Blakely plant from 2002 to 2008. He was facing 29 felony counts, which together carried up to 304 years in prison and more than $7 million in fines. In exchange for his cooperation, his term will be capped at 12 years and could be less.

He was a star witness at the trial in the past week and was key in confirming Lightsey's previous testimony.

Lightsey told the jury he worked as a quality control manager for 17 years in two other peanut plants before starting at Parnell's operation in July 2008. One of those jobs was next door at Universal Blanchers, another peanut processor.

Within days of his arrival at Peanut Corp., Lightsey testified, he came across test results for the company's products. It was the first time he'd seen a salmonella positive result.

"I'd never had one before," he said on the stand. "The biggest concern I had is that some of the product had already shipped. I was scared to death."

He said he emailed a memo that detailed the problematic results to Stewart Parnell and other company officials. In his mind, he said, Peanut Corp. should have immediately stopped production and notified its customers.

Instead, documents show that Peanut Corp. ordered a second test and when that came back negative for salmonella, Parnell told Lightsey in an email to "turn them loose." But Lightsey refused to obey until Parnell showed up at the plant and told him he was making an executive decision.

In other cases, Lightsey said, Peanut Corp. used test samples from a production lot different than the one being shipped to cover up positive salmonella tests.

Parnell's lawyer, Bondurant, cast doubt on Lightsey's testimony and framed him as a man who would say anything to get his jail time reduced. Lightsey faced 30 years before he struck a deal with the government. Now he can get no more than six.

Bondurant questioned how Peanut Corp. could have managed to keep a food giant like Kellogg in the dark and noted that in three audits before the salmonella outbreak the plant met Kellogg's specifications.

The defense showed the jury some of the same emails the prosecution used against Parnell and argued that they had been taken out of context. One showed a response from Parnell that asked for information so that he could "tell the truth."

But the defense arguments didn't sway Almer and other victims' family members watching the trial from afar.

"I know the trial hasn't even finished, but my gosh, I have seen so much evidence," Almer said. "I don't know how anyone can not get (the company's) intent in what occurred."

Progress but still hoping for justice

Besides the class action settlement, two big things came of the Peanut Corp. salmonella outbreak.

People like Almer, who had never paid attention to food safety, joined a national campaign to strengthen food regulations. He traveled the nation as an advocate, trying to persuade citizens and lawmakers of the need to pass tougher legislation.

"We took it upon ourselves to make laws stronger," he said.

The Food and Drug Administration estimates that every year, 48 million people -- one out of six -- suffer from food-borne illnesses. More than 100,000 people are hospitalized and about 3,000 die from infections the federal government says are largely preventable.

Yet food companies are still not required to test their products for safety.

Bill Marler, a Seattle food safety lawyer who represented victims of the Peanut Corp. salmonella outbreak, said all food facilities should be testing products.

"Scientifically based random testing gives you an assurance that you have a plan that your product is not adulterated," he said. "It's good business practice and smart for food safety."

Recalls of tainted products used to be voluntary, like the one this week announced by nSpired Natural Foods Inc.

The company recalled several lots of peanut, almond and other nut butters, fearing salmonella contamination. The affected products include Arrowhead Mills peanut butters, MaraNatha almond butters and peanut butters and specific private label nut butters sold under the Trader Joe's, Whole Foods, Kroger and Safeway brands.

But in early 2011, as a result of the campaign launched in the aftermath of the Peanut Corp. tragedy, President Barack Obama signed the Food Safety Modernization Act, which the FDA calls the most sweeping reform in food safety laws in 70 years.

For the first time, the law took aim at preventing food-borne illnesses rather than just responding to contamination that had already occurred. The new law gave the FDA the power to suspend a facility's ability to sell food in American markets and detain food that may be contaminated.

The problem, say food safety advocates, is there is not yet adequate funding for the FDA to fully enforce the law. The FDA declined to comment.

The new law requires food companies to report salmonella positive results to the FDA, after which a plant would be subject to federal inspection.

Patrick Archer, president of the American Peanut Council, said the 2008-09 outbreak was linked to a single manufacturer and not a reflection of the peanut industry as a whole.

"Food safety," he said, "is the U.S. peanut industry's highest priority."

Even before that outbreak, Archer said, the industry had adopted the FDA's voluntary code of good manufacturing practices. That includes operating procedures recommended specifically for peanut processors and a mandatory "kill step" to eliminate microbiological contamination, like roasting at high enough temperatures.

Had the new laws been fully in place in 2008, attorney Marler believes, Peanut Corp.'s salmonella-tainted peanut butter would have been caught much earlier. And, maybe, people like Shirley Almer would still be alive.

Over the last few years, the Justice Department has brought several civil cases against food companies.

It has also brought criminal charges against companies like Iowa-based Quality Egg for a 2010 salmonella outbreak that led to the recall of more than a half-billion eggs. Executives were charged with bribery of a public official, intent to defraud and introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce. They pleaded guilty in June but have not yet been sentenced.

The Peanut Corp. criminal case is the first one to go to trial.

All these cases, Marler said, send a strong message to the more than 171,000 registered food facilities in the United States to take their safety procedures seriously.

Lou Tousignant, whose father died in the Peanut Corp. outbreak, said criminal trials such as the one in Albany will go a long way toward deterrence. Clifford Tousignant lived through the Korean war, diabetes and two amputations. But at 78, he succumbed to a peanut butter sandwich.

"If Stewart Parnell is convicted and does jail time, it might make someone else think twice," said Lou Tousignant. "He played Russian roulette with his products. How can you defend that?"

For Jeff Almer, the passage of the 2011 federal food safety act was one solace he could take from "a dirty mess." His advocacy helped him cope with his loss and outrage. Now, he hopes, the trial will allow him to move forward.

Almer is returning to the Albany courtroom next week. He will sit with his sister by his side and face Parnell again. Last time Almer was there, he found himself in the uncomfortable position of holding open the door to the men's bathroom for Parnell and his lawyer. Almer felt certain Parnell knew who he was.

But Almer wasn't interested in speaking with the man he holds responsible for his mother's death. Almer can't forgive Parnell, he said, because the man has not asked for forgiveness.

But he said he hopes Parnell never suffers from dementia in old age. He wants him to always remember what Almer believes the company owner's actions did to innocent people.

Almer said he has only one question for Parnell: "Was the greed worth it?"

Follow CNN's Moni Basu on Twitter

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After driver's death, Tony Stewart's return to NASCAR cut short

Authorities said Ward died of "massive blunt trauma."Stewart withdrew from the NASCAR race in New York's Watkins Glen the day after Ward died. But after just 172 of 325 laps at the Atlanta Motor Speedway, his front right tire blew, and Stewart's car smacked the wall on Turn 2.In the end, Kasey Kahne won the race and clinched a spot in the "Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup" playoff.

(CNN) -- What started as a deeply emotional race for Tony Stewart ended prematurely when a blown tire cut short his return to NASCAR.

Stewart came back to competition Sunday for the first time since his car struck and killed another driver on August 9.

The crowd at the Oral-B USA 500 erupted in cheers as Stewart was introduced. But after just 172 of 325 laps at the Atlanta Motor Speedway, his front right tire blew, and Stewart's car smacked the wall on Turn 2.

In the end, Kasey Kahne won the race and clinched a spot in the "Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup" playoff. Matt Kenseth came in second, and Denny Hamlin finished third.

But many thoughts were with Stewart and Kevin Ward Jr., the 20-year-old driver who was killed at the Canandaigua Motorsports Park in New York.

Stewart declined to speak to a reporter after Sunday's race. But he spoke to the media briefly Friday about Ward's death.

"This has been one of the toughest tragedies I've ever had to deal with, both professionally and personally," Stewart said. "And this is something that will definitely affect my life forever."

Ward's death

Spectator video from the night of Ward's death shows two cars coming out of a turn, with Stewart's No. 14 car sliding up the track toward Ward's No. 13 car. The two cars get close and appear to make contact before Ward's car hits the wall and spins out.

Ward gets out of his crashed car and walks on the track toward the race cars, which had slowed for a yellow flag. Ward points a finger and appears to be yelling. One car swerves to avoid Ward on the half-mile dirt track.

Stewart's car passes close to Ward, and it appears that its right rear tire hits him. Authorities said Ward died of "massive blunt trauma."

Stewart withdrew from the NASCAR race in New York's Watkins Glen the day after Ward died. He also missed races in Michigan and Tennessee.

Under investigation

New York authorities have been investigating the fatal crash. Ontario County Sheriff Philip C. Povero has said there was no evidence that a crime had been committed.

Ward, from Port Leyden, New York, was in his fifth season in the Empire Super Sprints series. He began racing when he was 4, running go-kart events. When he was 12, he moved to the faster sprint cars.

His father blames Stewart for hitting his son.

"Apparently, Tony Stewart was the only one driving out there who didn't see him," the father said, according to Syracuse.com.

Stewart said that he wants Ward's parents and sisters "to know that every day I'm thinking about them and praying for them."

While the incident hit him hard, Stewart said he knows "that the pain and the mourning that Kevin Ward's family and friends are experiencing is something that I can't possibly imagine."

CNN's Jason Hanna, Steve Almasy and Wayne Sterling contributed to this report.

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Sand collapse kills 9-year-old girl at Oregon beach

Fire officials said Pye was standing in a 10-foot-deep pit when the sand rushed in around him.CNN's Mayra Cuevas contributed to this report. (CNN) -- When you think of potentially fatal threats at the beach, you probably think of sharks or riptides. The two sand-related fatalities earlier this summer were both grown men.A 49-year-old Virginia man died on the beach at North Carolina's Outer Banks on June 23, according to CNN affiliate WTVR.

(CNN) -- When you think of potentially fatal threats at the beach, you probably think of sharks or riptides. You probably don't worry about the sand. But that unexpected killer has now claimed at least three lives in the United States this summer.

Nine-year-old Isabel Grace Franks died at a Lincoln City, Oregon, beach on Friday, when a hole she was digging in the sand caved in and buried her, authorities said.

"We heard screaming," Tracey Dudley, who was staying at a nearby hotel, told CNN affiliate KATU. "At first we thought, you know, it was just kids. But it was like screaming and screaming and screaming."

"Her and her siblings were digging a big hole in the sand," Lincoln City police Sgt. Brian Eskridge said. "She was sitting inside, and the hole collapsed. We believe she was under the sand around five minutes."

Franks, her family and friends were visiting the beach from Sandy, Oregon.

Police and firefighters dug her out. She was unconscious and not breathing. Emergency crews performed CPR on her and transported her to a hospital, where she was declared dead.

Mourners left flowers, candles and notes near where she died.

Before the emergency workers arrived, beachgoers had frantically tried to dig her out, but the sand kept collapsing back into the hole, Eskridge said.

That's a common problem when someone gets buried at the beach, Tom Gill of the United States Lifesaving Association said Sunday.

"Once the sand starts collapsing, digging out becomes a technical rescue," Gill said. "It's difficult because the sand keeps collapsing back into the hole, and the more people gathering around, the more difficult it is."

"It's not unusual for kids to build holes and sandcastles in the sand, but a lot of people don't understand it can collapse," Eskridge said. "It's difficult for people to understand how hard it is to get people out."

Dry sand weighs 100 pounds per square foot, and wet sand weights 120 pounds per square foot, according to a 2004 study from the Mayo Clinic, entitled "Accidental Burials in Sand: A Potentially Fatal Summertime Hazard."

"Dry sand burial can totally engulf and compress a person... with no air pocket for breathing," the report said. "Depending on the age and strength of the child, just 1 foot of sand may overwhelm respiratory and diaphragmatic force,"

But according to the Mayo study, airway obstruction is an even bigger concern than sand stifling lung and diaphragm expansion.

"Although accidental sand burial has its own set of clinical problems, clearing the airway is the main focus of treatment. Airway management at the scene of the incident may be crucial and lifesaving," the Mayo report said.

The hole containing Franks was big enough for a crouching adult to fit in, witnesses told KATU.

Gill said no national standards exist to restrict the depth of holes, though local jurisdictions often set their own rules. For example, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, the USLA's home base, beach visitors aren't supposed to dig holes deeper than knee-level, even for small children, Gill said.

There's also no national database of fatal sand collapses, Gill said.

They don't happen often, Gill said, "but often enough that we try to make people aware."

Articles in scholarly journals over the past decade, including the Mayo report, have called for public health and safety officials to be more aware of sand dangers.

In June 2007, the New England Journal of Medicine published a letter to the editor entitled "Sudden Death from Collapsing Sand Holes," from Dr. Bradley Maron of Harvard Medical School. Maron counted "52 documented fatal and nonfatal cases, occurring primarily in the past 10 years, in which persons were submerged after the collapse of a dry-sand hole excavated for recreational purposes." He said 31 of those 52 people died, and "the other 21 survived by virtue of timely rescue involving extrication from the sand; many of them required cardiopulmonary resuscitation, performed by a bystander."

Maron's study concluded that collapses were inadvertently triggered by a variety of circumstances, including digging, tunneling, jumping, or falling into the hole.

Young children like Isabel Franks aren't the only age group at risk. The two sand-related fatalities earlier this summer were both grown men.

A 49-year-old Virginia man died on the beach at North Carolina's Outer Banks on June 23, according to CNN affiliate WTVR. David Frasier of Fredericksburg, Virginia, had to be extracted from a hole approximately 5 to 6 feet deep. A bystander tried to revive him, but was unsuccessful.

And on July 21, in Half Moon Bay, California, Adam Jay Pye was buried alive while tunneling under the sand, CNN affiliate KRON reported. Fire officials said Pye was standing in a 10-foot-deep pit when the sand rushed in around him.

CNN's Mayra Cuevas contributed to this report

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Americans detained in North Korea speak to CNN, ask for U.S. help

help in interviews with CNN.Kenneth Bae, Matthew Todd Miller and Jeffrey Edward Fowle were presented to CNN's Will Ripley at a Pyongyang hotel Monday. Pyongyang, North Korea (CNN) -- Three Americans detained in North Korea spoke out about their conditions and pleaded for U.S. North Korean officials monitored and recorded all three interviews, and CNN was unable to assess independently the conditions under which the men were being held.U.S.

Pyongyang, North Korea (CNN) -- Three Americans detained in North Korea spoke out about their conditions and pleaded for U.S. help in interviews with CNN.

Kenneth Bae, Matthew Todd Miller and Jeffrey Edward Fowle were presented to CNN's Will Ripley at a Pyongyang hotel Monday. Each was given five minutes for an interview.

All three men said they hope the U.S. government will send an envoy to North Korea to help get them out of their situations, similar to how former President Bill Clinton helped secure the release of two journalists in 2009.

Bae, who is serving a 15-year prison sentence for "hostile acts to bring down its government," said he is working eight hours a day, six days a week at a labor camp.

North Korea claimed Bae was part of a Christian plot to overthrow the regime.

"Right now what I can say to my friends and family is, continue to pray for me," he said.

Despite what he called "hard labor," Bae said he has been treated "as humanely as possible."

Miller, who is accused of tearing up his tourist visa and seeking asylum upon entry, implored the U.S. government for help during his interview.

He said he wanted to tell the United States that "my situation is very urgent, that very soon I am going to trial, and I would directly be sent to prison."

He said he will not learn of his charges until he goes to trial.

Fowle, an American tourist accused of leaving a Bible in a hotel where he was staying, said he has "no complaints" about his treatment.

"It's been very good so far, and I hope and pray that it continues, while I'm here two more days or two more decades," he said.

All three men said they have signed statements admitting their guilt. North Korean officials monitored and recorded all three interviews, and CNN was unable to assess independently the conditions under which the men were being held.

U.S. National Security Council spokesman Patrick Ventrell said Monday that securing the Americans' release "is a top priority and we have followed these cases closely in the White House. We continue to do all we can to secure their earliest possible release."

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said, "There is no greater priority for us than the welfare and safety of U.S. citizens abroad.

"Out of humanitarian concern for Jeffrey Fowle, Matthew Miller, and their families, we request the DPRK release them so they may return home," Psaki said, using the initials for North Korea's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. "We also request the DPRK pardon Kenneth Bae and grant him special amnesty and immediate release so he may reunite with his family and seek medical care. We continue to work actively to secure these three U.S. citizens' release."

The Swedish Embassy in Pyongyang acts as the "protecting power for issues involving U.S. citizens in North Korea," and the United States is in "regular, close coordination" with the embassy, she said. Swedish representatives visited Fowle on June 20, Miller on May 9 and June 21, and Bae 12 times since his detention, most recently on August 11 in a labor camp, Psaki said.

Surprise meetings

The circumstances leading up to the CNN interviews were bizarre.

A CNN team was on a government tour about two hours outside Pyongyang when it learned it had to leave immediately to meet with a high-level government official in the capital.

The crew boarded a van to a secret location, where it found out the meeting was with the three Americans.

Bae's family has been pushing for his release due to his worsening health. The 46-year-old suffers from diabetes and high blood pressure and has kidney stones.

"I've been going back and forth between hospital and to the labor camp for the last year and a half," Bae told Ripley on Monday.

He said his health has "been failing" over the past 1½ months.

"My hands are numb and tingling, and it's difficult sleeping at night, and I was working in the field every day," Bae said.

U.S. officials have repeatedly called on North Korea to release Bae but to no avail.

Even former basketball star Dennis Rodman, who has visited North Korea and called its ruler Kim Jong Un a "friend for life," asked Kim to "do me a solid and cut Kenneth Bae loose."

Terri Chung, Bae's sister, told CNN on Monday the video was "really difficult to watch" because her brother is generally "full of life and very cheerful. ... It is clear from the video that he is under a lot of stress. And he talks about his health failing and being in complete isolation for almost two years. And it is devastating for our family to see that on TV."

But she told "New Day" that "I think he's doing the best he can. ... Two years of being isolated and working in a labor camp, I know it is not easy. So I think you can see it is taking a toll both physically and mentally."

The U.S. government has been working "behind the scenes to try to procure his release, and we are once again reiterating our thanks, but also too pleading with our government to continue their efforts to secure his release immediately," she added, describing her brother as a "hardworking father of three."

Chung later released a statement asking the North Korean authorities to have mercy.

"It is in your power to release my brother. You could do it today. Please do so. He has confessed to the crimes for which he has been charged, and he has served a longer detainment than any other American since the war," Chung said.

Miller: 'I deliberately committed my crime'

Dressed in a black turtleneck and often staring at the ground in his interview, Miller said he has admitted his guilt -- even though he won't learn of his charges until he goes to trial.

"But I will say that I prepared to violate the law of the DPRK before coming here," Miller said.

"And I deliberately committed my crime. I have already admitted my guilt and apologized to the government of the DPRK and I have been asking for forgiveness."

When asked why he reportedly sought asylum in North Korea, Miller said he already discussed his motive during his investigation and that "for the interview, it is not necessary."

He expressed frustration that "there's been no movement from my government."

"The American government is known for having a strong policy of protecting its citizens, yet for my case there is still no movement," he said.

Fowle describes 'desperate situation'

North Korea announced Fowle's detention in June, saying he had violated the law by acting "contrary to the purpose of tourism."

"The charges are violations of DPRK law, which stems from me trying to leave a Bible," the 56-year-old told Ripley.

"It's a covert act and a violation of tourists rules. I've admitted my guilt to the government and signed a statement to that effect and requested forgiveness from the people and the government of the DPRK."

Fowle said he expects his trial to start within a month.

"You guys should convey my desperate situation," he said.

"I've got a wife and three elementary school-aged kids that depend on me for support."

Read: What North Korea wants world to see

CNN's Will Ripley reported from Pyongyang; CNN's Holly Yan wrote from Atlanta. CNN's Jethro Mullen and Paula Hancocks contributed to this report.

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Battersea Power Station: The life, death and rebirth of a London icon

London (CNN) -- Ever since it appeared on the cover of Animals, Pink Floyd's 1977 album, Battersea Power Station in London has been famous around the world.It has appeared in everything from the Beatles' 1965 movie Help.

London (CNN) -- Ever since it appeared on the cover of Animals, Pink Floyd's 1977 album, Battersea Power Station in London has been famous around the world.

It has appeared in everything from the Beatles' 1965 movie Help! to Christopher Nolan's 2008 Batman movie The Dark Knight, and even Dr Who.

But later this year, its distinctive chimneys -- the best-loved parts of one of London's best-loved buildings -- will be demolished.

Then they will be built back up again.

"The chimneys are the most powerful part of the icon," says Jim Eyre, director of Wilkinson Eyre, the architects commissioned to develop the building.

"Take them away, and you don't have an icon. The coal fumes has decayed the concrete, so they have to come down. But we're going to painstakingly reconstruct them."

Such will be the attention to detail that even the paint used will be precisely the same hue.

And it will be sourced from the same manufacturer that provided the paint for the original chimneys, more than 80 years ago.

The replacement of the chimneys is just the first stage in a development that will change Battersea Power Station forever, arousing a passionate debate.

A London Icon

The power station was built in the Thirties as a functioning coal-fired electricity generator. But the building was so distinctive that it became recognized as a valuable part of the cityscape.

The station stopped functioning in 1983, and has since fallen into disrepair.

It's vast -- St Paul's Cathedral, another of London's landmarks, could snugly fit into its old turbine rooms -- and over the years it has acquired the status of one of the architectural world's best-known white elephants.

READ: Is Biology the future of design?

Now, funded by Malaysian developers, work is underway to transform the building into a massive complex of retail space, offices, and luxury "villas".

Crowning the top of the development, at a height of more than 160 feet, there will be a roof garden.

The first phase will be completed in 2016.

Eyre's plans for the chimneys are emblematic of his approach towards developing the site.

"Two of them are still going to be used as flues for the massive, modern energy center that we're going to construct to power the place," he says.

"The third will remain hollow with a glass roof, and the fourth will house a cylindrical glass elevator that will pop out at the top at a viewing platform."

Although the massive central cavity will be split into five floors and stuffed with stores and offices, Eyre has included several areas where a "cut-out" will allow a glimpse of the distant ceiling.

"There was a temptation to fill it right to the edges," he says.

"But when you enter the building, there will be an opening into a big space that will preserve the stunning sense of volume."

Care will be taken to protect a flavor of the past on the inside, too.

In an approach that Eyre calls "light renovation", graffiti and the stains of age will not be scrubbed clean or painted over.

"As part of the development, the building will be surrounded by massive modern office and retail blocks," he says.

"The chimneys will still pop out the top, but the lovely, fluted flanks will be obscured. I think that's a shame, but it's the price you have to pay for development."

Questions have been raised, however, over the price of the new apartments.

READ: 10 extraordinary futuristic wilderness hideouts

At £2,000 per square foot, they will cost the same as those in the "golden postcodes" of Kensington and Chelsea and parts of Westminster.

For an icon that represents all of London, that seems a little exclusive.

"I am aware of that," he says.

"The control room, for instance, is a wonderful example of art deco extravagance. It would be easy to turn it into a restaurant, but it would be a very expensive restaurant. Instead it will be a space for public events, like fashion shows."

Controversial restoration

The development of the Battersea Power Station has re-opened the highly-charged debate about whether -- and how -- iconic buildings should be preserved, modified or replaced, and who they "belong" to.

In this age of technology, fast-paced social change and innovation, many see it as the most important architectural dilemma of our times.

Sir Terry Farrell, one of Britain's foremost architects hose credits include everything from Charing Cross Station to the MI6 headquarters on the banks of the Thames, is sharply critical of Eyre's design.

"I think it's rather sad," he told CNN.

"There's quite a fashion for keeping the outside appearance of a building at the expense of the interior. When you're inside Battersea Power Station, you won't know it because the corridors, shops and apartments will be the same as everywhere else."

"My feeling is that it's the sheer opportunity to get a couple of million square feet in there. Under the pretext of keeping the shell of the building, you're getting planning consent for a lot of space. In London, you can charge £2,000 per square foot. That's quite a lot of money, and I can see the temptation. But there are other ways that could work just as well."

Farrell's own design for the site, which was not taken forward because of fears over planning permission, would have turned the power station into an "iconic ruin" standing over a massive public space.

It would have been made financially viable by the construction of high-value apartments around the power station.

"I said that what we should do is remove the walls but retain the colonnade, and make the whole interior a park," he said.

READ: Astonishing paper sculptures

"It would be like a giant abbey ruins, or a Greek temple with just the columns and no roof. The key features, like the control rooms, would be kept exactly in the place they occurred on legs."

This, he argued, would enable people to "go in and feel the space".

"You would understand far more what it used to be. It would be a sort of monument," he said.

"It would be far better than going to a shopping center, or a luxury home, and saying, 'do you realize this used to be Battersea Power Station?'"

Such controversy is only to be expected when the future of such an important building as this is at stake.

And the more iconic a building, the more forensic critics of its redevelopment will be.

Eye-popping vertical: Photos give Hong Kong skyscrapers a radical new look

The enduring allure of steam trains: A nostalgic journey back in time

A rare snoop inside homes of some of the world's greatest living architects

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U.S. Open: Caroline Wozniacki thriving after McIlroy split

1 Novak Djokovic beat Germany's Philipp Kohlschreiber 6-1 7-5 6-4 and will face either Andy Murray or Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the quarterfinals.Read: Wozniacki beats Sharapova in New YorkRead: McIlroy ends plans to wed Wozniacki. She's sure to return to the Big Apple that month, however, having decided following their split to run in the New York City Marathon.Wozniacki has so far refused to discuss her relationship with McIlroy at the U.S.

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(CNN) -- Caroline Wozniacki has had her critics in the past. A defensive game and not landing a grand slam title while she was ranked No. 1 provided fodder for her detractors.

But now everyone, it seems, is rooting for the Dane.

Why? Well, much of it must be down to the fact that Wozniacki was dumped -- and very publicly -- by golf sensation Rory McIlroy only months before they were due to tie the knot.

McIlroy ended the relationship in May, saying he wasn't ready for marriage, and the news left Wozniacki devastated.

She was visibly distraught as she spoke to reporters at the French Open soon after, and exited in the first round, her earliest loss at Roland Garros in seven years.

The Northern Irishman has since rediscovered his vintage form, claiming he is more focused, and has won two major titles and regained his No. 1 ranking.

Wozniacki has also picked up her game after a lengthy slump.

She's the favorite to reach the U.S. Open final from the bottom half of the draw after upsetting Maria Sharapova on Sunday. And whereas Wozniacki said earlier in 2014 she would like to become a young mother -- suggesting her tennis days were numbered -- her own focus is now solely on the court.

That Wozniacki is prospering in New York is slightly ironic -- it was where she was reportedly supposed to marry McIlroy in November. She's sure to return to the Big Apple that month, however, having decided following their split to run in the New York City Marathon.

Wozniacki has so far refused to discuss her relationship with McIlroy at the U.S. Open, not that any of the fans minded.

The crowd at Arthur Ashe Stadium in her match against Sharapova was firmly behind the 24-year-old, leading her to gush afterwards: "The crowd was amazing today."

Her victory over Sharapova put Wozniacki into a first grand slam quarterfinal since the 2012 Australian Open.

"The season for me has been a little bit up and down," Wozniacki said. "And it's so nice to kind of start feeling like I'm playing the way I want to.

"This hard-court season has been amazing for me. I actually started already feeling really good on court since Eastbourne (in June). I have just been building on my game since then."

I think this describes it! @usopen pic.twitter.com/3tjWbJ2ztu

Wozniacki won a title in Istanbul in July and even though she didn't add to her haul in Montreal and Cincinnati, the player that stopped her was world No. 1 Serena Williams. Both of their encounters went to three sets.

They have become good friends this year, spending time together in Miami after their early departures from the French Open.

Although Wozniacki still can't be considered an attacking player, her serve has improved, and she has become more aggressive on the baseline.

Her retrieving, though, is still what gives opponents problems. Making Sharapova keep running paid off, as the Russian committed 43 unforced errors.

"I think she's better at what she's done really well in her career," Sharapova said. "I think she's moving extremely well; she's fit.

"I mean, she's always been fit, but there is a little bit more on her defense shots.

"It's not just balls up in the air. She's doing a little bit more with them."

Wozniacki faces another counter puncher, Sara Errani, in the last eight on Tuesday, and could face Williams -- again -- in the final. Williams advanced to the quarterfinals Monday by beating Estonia's Kaia Kanepi 6-3 6-3.

"I have had a great summer, and I told Serena I'm pretty tired of her," said Wozniacki. "I said, 'Can you just get out of my way?'

"We just laugh about it. This one was a great win for me. Maria, again, is a good player. For me, I think mentally as well to get that in my pocket is kind of nice.

"I still have hopefully a few good matches in me here in this tournament."

Pennetta continues U.S. success

New York is also proving to be a happy hunting ground for Flavia Pennetta, a semifinalist last year.

The Italian won the biggest title of her career in Indian Wells, California in March but has done little to back that up since.

However, the 11th seed is now one win away from matching that feat after topping Australia's Casey Dellacqua 7-5 6-2 in early play Monday to earn a place in the last eight.

But to get any further the 32-year-old will have to get past defending champion Williams.

Men's No. 1 Novak Djokovic beat Germany's Philipp Kohlschreiber 6-1 7-5 6-4 and will face either Andy Murray or Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the quarterfinals.

Read: Wozniacki beats Sharapova in New York

Read: McIlroy ends plans to wed Wozniacki

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Chris Tucker settles huge tax bill; poor management blamed for IRS lien

"The current lien filing by the IRS was the result of an audit that lasted for four years which stemmed from poor accounting and business management.""Representatives for Mr. Tucker reached a resolution with the IRS on Friday, and his case has been settled," the representative said.A TMZ report that Tucker owed $14 million to the IRS was inaccurate, the rep said.CNN's Joan Yeam contributed to this report.

(CNN) -- Comedian Chris Tucker's multimillion dollar tax bill isn't very funny, but he's reached a deal with the IRS to settle it, his representative said Monday.

The federal tax collector placed a $2.5 million lien against Tucker in Georgia last week, but it was just a "technical requirement" before a settlement could become official, Tucker's representative said.

"Chris Tucker has not incurred any new tax years," the representative said. "The current lien filing by the IRS was the result of an audit that lasted for four years which stemmed from poor accounting and business management."

"Representatives for Mr. Tucker reached a resolution with the IRS on Friday, and his case has been settled," the representative said.

A TMZ report that Tucker owed $14 million to the IRS was inaccurate, the rep said.

CNN's Joan Yeam contributed to this report.

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Israel shoots down drone near Syrian border

(CNN) -- Israel has shot down an unmanned aerial vehicle that entered Israeli airspace near the Syrian border on Sunday, the Israel Defense Forces confirmed.The drone was destroyed by a Patriot surface-to-air missile over Quneitra in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, IDF spokesman Lt. counts 3 million Syria refugeesEXCLUSIVE: Boy, 13, witnesses beheadingsCNN's Michael Schwartz contributed to this story. It is considered by the international community to be occupied territory.READ: U.N.

(CNN) -- Israel has shot down an unmanned aerial vehicle that entered Israeli airspace near the Syrian border on Sunday, the Israel Defense Forces confirmed.

The drone was destroyed by a Patriot surface-to-air missile over Quneitra in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, IDF spokesman Lt. Col. Peter Lerner said.

"In spite of the IDF's sensitivity to recent occurrences in the proximity of the border, we have repeatedly stated that we will respond to any breach of Israel's sovereignty and will continue to act to maintain safety and security to the civilians of the State of Israel," Lerner added.

This is the first drone from Syria that Israel has shot down, although the IDF has shot down UAVs from Hamas and Hezbollah before.

It's unclear which group in war-torn Syria was operating the UAV and why. It could have been the embattled government of President Bashar al-Assad or any of a number of rebel fighting groups or militant organizations.

The downing of the drone is the latest development in the Golan Heights on the Israeli-Syrian border, where United Nations peacekeepers were attacked on Saturday. U.N. officials said they were working to gain the release of dozens of peacekeepers detained by Islamist fighters when the attack occurred.

The U.N. has not identified the group responsible for detaining at least 44 peacekeepers, but an Israeli military official told CNN Syrian militants are behind the incident .

Al-Nusra Front fighters and other Syrian rebels seized control of the Syrian side of the Quneitra crossing last week -- a capture that represents a new dynamic in a war long feared not only for its deadly effects inside Syria but for threatening to widen into a destabilizing regional conflict.

Syria is in turmoil as a bloody yearslong civil war rages on.

The United Nations Disengagement Observer Force has been in place in the Golan Heights since 1974 to maintain a ceasefire between Israel and Syria.

Israel seized control of the Golan Heights during the 1967 Six-Day War and fought off an attempt by Syria in 1973 to retake the rocky plateau.

In 1981, Israel annexed the Golan Heights. It is considered by the international community to be occupied territory.

READ: U.N. counts 3 million Syria refugees

EXCLUSIVE: Boy, 13, witnesses beheadings

CNN's Michael Schwartz contributed to this story.

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Israel-Gaza crisis

Palestinians in Gaza celebrate a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas on Tuesday, August 26. After more than seven weeks of heavy fighting, Israel and Hamas agreed to an open-ended ceasefire that puts off dealing with core long-term issues.

Palestinians in Gaza celebrate a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas on Tuesday, August 26. After more than seven weeks of heavy fighting, Israel and Hamas agreed to an open-ended ceasefire that puts off dealing with core long-term issues.

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