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A primer on e-cigarettes

The agency also could limit sales over the Internet and require retailers to move e-cigarettes behind the counter. By MICHAEL FELBERBAUM AP Tobacco Writer April 22, 2014 11:13AM The Food and Drug Administration will soon propose rules for e-cigarettes. Companies can't tout e-cigarettes as stop-smoking aids, unless they want to be regulated by the FDA under stricter rules for drug-delivery devices.

By MICHAEL FELBERBAUM AP Tobacco Writer April 22, 2014 11:13AM

The Food and Drug Administration will soon propose rules for e-cigarettes. | AP Photo/Wichita Falls Times Record News, Torin Halsey, File

RICHMOND, Va. ? Smokers are increasingly turning to battery-powered electronic cigarettes to get their nicotine fix. They’re about to find out what federal regulators have to say about the popular devices.

The Food and Drug Administration will propose rules for e-cigarettes as early as this month. The rules will have big implications for a fast-growing, largely unregulated industry and its legions of customers.

The FDA faces a balancing act. If the regulations are too strict, they could kill an industry that offers a hope of being safer than cigarettes and potentially helping smokers quit them. But the agency also has to be sure e-cigarettes really are safer and aren’t hooking children on an addictive drug.

Members of Congress and several public health groups have raised safety concerns over e-cigarettes, questioned their marketing tactics and called on regulators to address those worries quickly.

Here’s a primer on e-cigarettes and their future:

WHAT ARE E-CIGARETTES?

E-cigarettes are plastic or metal tubes, usually the size of a cigarette, that heat a liquid nicotine solution instead of burning tobacco. That creates vapor that users inhale.

Smokers like e-cigarettes because the nicotine-infused vapor looks like smoke but doesn’t contain the thousands of chemicals, tar or odor of regular cigarettes. Some smokers use e-cigarettes as a way to quit smoking tobacco, or to cut down.

The industry started on the Internet and at shopping-mall kiosks and has rocketed from thousands of users in 2006 to several million worldwide who can choose from more than 200 brands. Sales are estimated to have reached nearly $2 billion in 2013.

Tobacco company executives have noted that they are eating into traditional cigarette sales. Their companies have jumped into the business.

There’s not much scientific evidence showing e-cigarettes help smokers quit or smoke less, and it’s unclear how safe they are.

WHAT IS THE FDA LIKELY TO DO?

The FDA is likely to propose restrictions that mirror those on regular cigarettes.

The most likely of the FDA’s actions will be to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to people under 18. Many companies already restrict sales to minors, and more than two dozen states already have banned selling them to young people.

Federal regulators also are expected to set product standards and require companies to disclose their ingredients and place health warning labels on packages and other advertising.

Where the real questions remain is how the agency will treat the thousands of flavors available for e-cigarettes. While some companies are limiting offerings to tobacco and menthol flavors, others are selling candy-like flavors like cherry and strawberry. Flavors other than menthol are banned for regular cigarettes over concerns that flavored tobacco targets children.

Regulators also must determine if they’ll treat various designs for electronic cigarettes differently. Some, known as “cig-a-likes,” look like traditional cigarettes and use sealed cartridges that hold liquid nicotine. Others have empty compartments or tanks that users can fill their own liquid. The latter has raised safety concerns because ingesting the liquid or absorbing it through the skin could lead to nicotine poisoning. To prevent that, the FDA could mandate child-resistant packaging.

The FDA also will decide the grandfather date that would allow electronic cigarette products to remain on the market without getting prior approval from regulators ? a ruling that could force some, if not all, e-cigarettes to be pulled from store shelves while they are evaluated by the agency.

The regulations will be a step in a long process that many believe will ultimately end up being challenged in court.

WHAT ABOUT MARKETING?

There are a few limitations on marketing. Companies can’t tout e-cigarettes as stop-smoking aids, unless they want to be regulated by the FDA under stricter rules for drug-delivery devices. But many are sold as “cigarette alternatives.”

The FDA’s proposals could curb advertising on TV, radio and billboards; ban sponsorship of concerts and sporting events, and prohibit branded items such as shirts and hats. The agency also could limit sales over the Internet and require retailers to move e-cigarettes behind the counter.

WHAT DOES THE INDUSTRY THINK?

The industry expects regulations, but hopes they won’t force products off shelves and will keep the business viable.

E-cigarette makers especially want the FDA to allow them to continue marketing and catering to adult smokers ? some of whom want flavors other than tobacco. They believe e-cigarettes present an opportunity to offer smokers an alternative and, as NJOY Inc. CEO Craig Weiss says, make cigarettes obsolete.

“FDA can’t just say no to electronic cigarettes anymore. I think they also understand it’s the lesser of the two evils,” said James Xu, owner of several Avail Vapor shops, whose wooden shelves are lined with vials of liquid nicotine flavor, such as Gold Rush, Cowboy Cut and Forbidden Fruit.

WHAT DO PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICIALS THINK?

Some believe lightly regulating electronic cigarettes might actually be better for public health overall, if smokers switch and e-cigarettes really are safer. Others are raising alarms about the hazards of the products and a litany of questions about whether e-cigarettes will keep smokers addicted or encourage others to start using e-cigarettes, and even eventually tobacco products.

“This is a very complicated issue and we must be quite careful how we proceed,” said David Abrams, executive director of the Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies at the American Legacy Foundation, in a recent panel discussion. “I call this sort of the Goldilocks approach. The regulation must be just right. The porridge can’t be too hot, and it can’t be too cold.”

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
18 Points
1

8 injured in less than 7 hours in gun violence across city

He was taken to Saint Bernard Hospital and Health Care Center in good condition, police said.Just after 5 p.m., a 24-year-old man was shot while sitting on his porch in the 6700 block of South Oakley Avenue in the Chicago Lawn neighborhood. He was on a porch in the 1700 block of West 71st Street when someone ran out of a gangway and opened fire, striking the man, police said. Someone walked out of a gangway and opened fire, striking the man under his right arm, police said.

BY SAM CHARLESStaff Reporter April 22, 2014 9:00PM

Updated: April 22, 2014 9:03PM

One day after Mayor Rahm Emanuel decried the rash of shootings over the Easter holiday weekend, eight people were shot across the city in less than seven hours.

The ages of the victims ? one teenager and seven men ? ranged from 14 to 56.

In the most recent incident, a 23-year-old man was wounded about 7:30 p.m. in the West Englewood neighborhood, Chicago Police said. He was on a porch in the 1700 block of West 71st Street when someone ran out of a gangway and opened fire, striking the man, police said. He was taken to Holy Cross Hospital in good condition.

About 7 p.m., a 56-year-old man was shot in his knee in the 1800 block of South Central Park Avenue in the North Lawndale neighborhood. He was taken to Mount Sinai Hospital in good condition.

About 6:40 p.m., a 14-year-old boy was shot in the Chicago Lawn neighborhood on the South Side. He was standing on a porch in the 7300 block of South Maplewood Avenue when suspects ran out from across the street and started shooting, police said. He was taken to Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn in good condition.

About 5:50 p.m., a 29-year-old man was shot in the ankle in the 7500 block of South Yale Avenue in the Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood. He was taken to Saint Bernard Hospital and Health Care Center in good condition, police said.

Just after 5 p.m., a 24-year-old man was shot while sitting on his porch in the 6700 block of South Oakley Avenue in the Chicago Lawn neighborhood. Someone walked out of a gangway and opened fire, striking the man under his right arm, police said. He was taken to Christ Medical Center.

About 4 p.m., a 23-year-old man was shot in the Logan Square neighborhood on the Northwest Side. He was in a vehicle in the 3600 block of West Armitage Avenue when another vehicle drove up and someone from inside opened fire, police said. He was taken to Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in serious condition. The shooting was thought to be gang-related, according to a police source.

About the same time, a 20-year-old man was shot in the ankle and back in the 1600 block of West 59th Street in West Englewood, police said. The man went to Holy Cross Hospital, police said.

The day’s first shooting occurred about 1:10 p.m. in the Roseland neighborhood on the Far South Side. An 18-year-old man walked into Roseland Community Hospital with a gunshot wound in his wrist and told police he had been shot in the 200 block of West 112th Street. He was listed in good condition.

No one was in custody in any of the shootings. Area detectives were investigating.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
16 Points
1

When life gives you ham, make an omelet

Add the potatoes and onions, cover and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes or until evenly browned and potatoes are tender. Add the potatoes and onions, cover and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes or until evenly browned and potatoes are tender. Sprinkle the omelet with the cheese and return to the oven until the cheese melts. Sprinkle the omelet with the cheese and return to the oven until the cheese melts.

BY MELISSA ELSMO Out of Mel’s Kitchen April 22, 2014 11:35AM

A German-style omelet is one way to whittle down reserves of leftover Easter ham. | Photo by Melissa Elsmo

My Mom’s BauerNfrühstück-German Farmer’s Breakfast

Over 30 years ago, while vacationing in California, my mom bought a copy of the Sunset Cookbook for $2.99. It contained a recipe for Bauernfrühstück and over the years she adapted the egg dish to suit her personal tastes.

1/4 cup butter

2 cups diced raw potato

1/4 cup chopped sweet onion

1/8 cup diced red pepper

1 1/2 cup leftover diced ham

1/4 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley

6 eggs

3/4 teaspoon salt and a dash pepper

2 tablespoons milk

1/2 cup shredded Havarti cheese

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Melt butter in a 10-inch oven-proof, non-stick frying pan. Add the potatoes and onions, cover and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes or until evenly browned and potatoes are tender. Add the ham and parsley and mix well. Reduce heat to medium-low.

In a medium bowl beat together the eggs, salt, pepper and milk until well-blended. Pour the egg mixture over the potatoes and ham. Cover and cook until eggs are almost set (about 15 minutes). Transfer the pan to the oven for 5-8 minutes or until eggs are fully set. Sprinkle the omelet with the cheese and return to the oven until the cheese melts.

Using a rubber spatula, transfer the Bauernfrühstück to a serving plate. Cut into 6-8 wedges and serve.

I think I am going to make a ham this week.

Those seemingly innocuous words would fall from my mother’s mouth once every three months or so and send me into a culinary tailspin known as ham dread.

Even though our local supermarket was likely peddling hams for pennies a pound, my mom’s initial ham dinner always had a Norman Rockwell vibe and served to quell my fears for a little while. She’d center the enormous Coca-Cola glazed beast in the center of the table and serve it alongside scalloped potatoes and green beans. We’d slather warm rolls with butter and talk merrily as we nibbled the salty meat.

As our family meal came to a happy end we’d inevitably turn our attention to the leftover ham in the middle of the table. Even though we had eaten ourselves into a smoked-meat coma it looked as though we had barely made a dent in the 18-pound ham. In that moment ham dread would overtake my brother and I in full force. We knew our family dinners were destined to become an endless parade of ham sandwiches, ham and cheese omelets, ham salads, ham and potatoes, creamy ham casserole and ultimately some sort of super freaky cherry glazed ham loaf.

My mom had an endless arsenal of magical recipes for leftover ham. The smoked pork themed dinners just kept on coming for what felt like weeks until that ham’s bone gave up its last morsels of meat in a pot of thick pea soup. And just when we couldn’t take another bite of ham, that squeaky clean bone would finally land with a loud thud at the bottom of an otherwise empty garbage can.

Sure, we had all endured more than a few sodium-induced blood-pressure spikes, but her talent for stretching a single ham into a week’s worth of family meals was most impressive. In fact, the folks behind the nose-to-tail movement of today could have seriously learned a thing or two from watching my mom handle a ham.

I am happy to report the ham dread of my youth has been replaced with a sincere respect for the frugal approach my mom took with her cookery. I’ve even passed ham dread down through the generations by cooking up a ham and whittling it down to the bone for my family a couple of times a year.

With Easter having just ended, plenty of folks are starring down a refrigerator full of leftover ham these days and I thought it would be only fitting to share one of my mom’s many recipes to use up mountains of holiday leftovers. Her take on a German omelet is both filling and delicious and a worthy way to revisit the humble ham.

My Mom’s BauerNfrühstück-German Farmer’s Breakfast

Over 30 years ago, while vacationing in California, my mom bought a copy of the Sunset Cookbook for $2.99. It contained a recipe for Bauernfrühstück and over the years she adapted the egg dish to suit her personal tastes.

1/4 cup butter

2 cups diced raw potato

1/4 cup chopped sweet onion

1/8 cup diced red pepper

1 1/2 cup leftover diced ham

1/4 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley

6 eggs

3/4 teaspoon salt and a dash pepper

2 Tablespoons milk

1/2 cup shredded Havarti cheese

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Melt butter in a 10-inch oven-proof, non-stick frying pan. Add the potatoes and onions, cover and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes or until evenly browned and potatoes are tender. Add the ham and parsley and mix well. Reduce heat to medium-low.

In a medium bowl beat together the eggs, salt, pepper and milk until well-blended. Pour the egg mixture over the potatoes and ham. Cover and cook until eggs are almost set (about 15 minutes). Transfer the pan to the oven for 5-8 minutes or until eggs are fully set. Sprinkle the omelet with the cheese and return to the oven until the cheese melts.

Using a rubber spatula, transfer the Bauernfrühstück to a serving plate. Cut into 6-8 wedges and serve.

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

Stocks move higher as more earnings roll in

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS April 22, 2014 9:08AM Stocks rose Tuesday as more companies reported solid first-quarter earnings. The Nasdaq composite rose 39 points, or 1 percent, to 4,161.Bond prices didn't change much. | AP file photo Updated: April 22, 2014 3:36PMNEW YORK .

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS April 22, 2014 9:08AM

Stocks rose Tuesday as more companies reported solid first-quarter earnings. The market also got a lift from deal news. | AP file photo

Updated: April 22, 2014 3:36PM

NEW YORK ? The stock market notched its sixth gain in a row Tueday as more U.S. companies report solid earnings.

It’s the longest winning streak since September.

Netflix rose 7 percent after the online video streaming service said its first-quarter earnings soared.

Harley-Davidson jumped 6 percent after the company reported that its motorcycle sales rose worldwide.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose seven points, or 0.4 percent, to close at 1,879 Tuesday.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 65 points, or 0.4 percent, to 16,514. The Nasdaq composite rose 39 points, or 1 percent, to 4,161.

Bond prices didn’t change much. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note was flat at 2.72 percent.

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

Toews, Kane back on the same line

BY MARK LAZERUS Staff Reporter April 22, 2014 3:38PM Chicago Blackhawks right wing Patrick Kane, left, celebrates with Chicago Blackhawks center Jonathan Toews after Toews scored a first-period goal during Game 3 of a first-round NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff series game Monday, April 21, 2014, in Chicago. MANDATORY CREDIT, MAGS OUT, TV OUT (AP photo / Daily Herald, Steve Lundy ) .

BY MARK LAZERUS Staff Reporter April 22, 2014 3:38PM

Chicago Blackhawks right wing Patrick Kane, left, celebrates with Chicago Blackhawks center Jonathan Toews after Toews scored a first-period goal during Game 3 of a first-round NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff series game Monday, April 21, 2014, in Chicago. MANDATORY CREDIT, MAGS OUT, TV OUT (AP photo / Daily Herald, Steve Lundy )

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

Tom Thibodeau finishes third for NBA Coach of the Year

(AP Photo/Matt Marton) Updated: April 22, 2014 3:27PMHow much was Tom Thibodeau paying attention to the naming of the 2013-14 NBA Coach of the Year on Tuesday. BY JOE COWLEY Staff Reporter April 22, 2014 3:26PM Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah, left, and coach Tom Thibodeau pose for a photo after Noah was awarded the NBA's Defensive Player of the Year, Monday, April 21, 2014, in Lincolnshire, Ill.

BY JOE COWLEY Staff Reporter April 22, 2014 3:26PM

Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah, left, and coach Tom Thibodeau pose for a photo after Noah was awarded the NBA's Defensive Player of the Year, Monday, April 21, 2014, in Lincolnshire, Ill. (AP Photo/Matt Marton)

Updated: April 22, 2014 3:27PM

How much was Tom Thibodeau paying attention to the naming of the 2013-14 NBA Coach of the Year on Tuesday?

“I didn’t see it,’’ the Bulls coach said, just minutes after the morning shootaround came to an end.

For the rest of the story, click HERE

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

Emanuel orders CPS: Air conditioning in all classrooms in 5 years

Upshot: Now, at the mayor's direction, the 206 school buildings that do not have full air conditioning will get it within the next five years. To wit: Sneed is told Emanuel has now ordered the Chicago Public School system to add air conditioning to every classroom in the city that doesn't have it . Sneed hears Mayor Rahm Emanuel has a cool new plan in the works.It's called air conditioning for every classroom in Chicago.

By MICHAEL SNEED April 21, 2014 8:52PM

Mayor Rahm Emanuel answers questions from the media inside a classroom at Chopin Elementary school on the first day of school after the strike ended in Chicago on Sept. 19, 2012. | Al Podgorski~Chicago Sun-Times.

Updated: April 22, 2014 10:46AM

The fan plan . . .

Sneed hears Mayor Rahm Emanuel has a cool new plan in the works.

It’s called air conditioning for every classroom in Chicago.

? To wit: Sneed is told Emanuel has now ordered the Chicago Public School system to add air conditioning to every classroom in the city that doesn’t have it . . . starting this summer.

? Backshot: Last year, at the mayor’s direction, air conditioning units were ordered for all 70 buildings incorporating students from schools that had to be closed.

? Upshot: Now, at the mayor’s direction, the 206 school buildings that do not have full air conditioning will get it within the next five years. The upgrades will be paid for through the CPS capital budget, though it’s not clear how much they will cost.

? Facts:

The Chicago Public School system includes 658 total schools housed in 530 buildings.

? 324 have full A/C.

? 44 have no A/C.

? 162 have partial A/C.

Royal musings . . .

In case you are wondering, England’s Queen Elizabeth just turned a spry 88 years old ? and her newest great-grandchild and future heir, baby Prince George, just had the spittle wiped off his mouth by his mother Kate Middleton, who chose to do so with her hand. A charming common touch, what?

Get it while it’s hot!

Sneed is told 336 first-time homebuyers just snagged $45 million in mortgage help from Gov. Pat Quinn’s new affordable mortgage program, which was announced exclusively weeks ago in Sneed’s column.

? To wit: The Welcome Home Illinois program’s website has had a whopping 45,000 hits since its launch three weeks ago, providing eligible first-time homebuyers with down-payment assistance and a 30-year fixed mortgage offered by the Illinois Housing Development Authority at below-market interest rates.

Watch for Quinn to tout the results Tuesday at an affordable housing conference in Chicago, while urging potential homeowners to act fast while the program is still available.

Tit for tat?

Rumors are flying that outgoing U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is being urged by pals to run for the U.S. Senate from Kansas ? against an old family friend.

“She’s tough, she’s been through the grinder, and she is going back to Kansas,” said a source, “but I don’t think she will run against Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts ? an old friend who blasted her for ‘gross incompetence’ after the rollout fiasco of Obamacare.”

Is payback time in the offing? “She’d like to give him a thwack, but don’t bet on it,” said the source.

Congrats to . . .

. . . Tatyana McFadden, a champion U.S. Paralympic wheelchair racer and full-time University of Illinois student, on winning the Boston Marathon for the second year in a row Monday. McFadden was born with spina bifida and adopted from a Russian orphanage when she was 6 years old. Sneed caught up with her last year, after her first Boston Marathon win was marred by the bombing near the finish line.

I spy . . .

Chicago Blackhawks owner Rocky Wirtz spotted at Joe Fish last week . . . Hawk Patrick Kane en famille dining at Rosebud on Rush on Easter Sunday . . . After the Bulls’ loss to the Washington Wizards Sunday, Bull Nazr Mohammed dined at River North’s Siena Tavern with the Wizards’ John Wall . . . A bevy of Boston Red Sox, including Dustin Pedroia, ate at David Burke’s Primehouse this past Monday before their game with the White Sox Tuesday.

Sneedlings . . .

Tuesday’s birthdays: Jack Nicholson, 77; Peter Frampton, 64, and Amber Heard, 28.

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

Eugenia Last horoscopes for April 22

4 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Emotions will fluctuate. Your sensitive, intuitive approach will guide you down the right path. Your strength is your ability to adapt and keep moving forward. 18): Mull over personal, financial or medical issues that need to be resolved. 5 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Prepare to make amends and do whatever damage control is necessary to avoid a problem with a personal or professional partner.

EUGENIA LAST April 17, 2014 8:43PM

Updated: April 21, 2014 11:27AM

CELEBRITIES BORN ON THIS DAY: Amber Heard, 28; Sherri Shepherd, 47; Jack Nicholson, 77; Glen Campbell, 78

Happy Birthday: You will attract extraordinary partners who are striving to reach similar goals. Your ability to express your desires succinctly will help to weed out anyone trying to ride on your coattails. Your focus should be on commitment and following through with your plans. Your sensitive, intuitive approach will guide you down the right path. Your numbers are 3, 18, 21, 23, 34, 37, 46.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Changes made for the wrong reason won’t get you ahead. Find alternative solutions by embracing whatever problem you face responsibly. Your strength is your ability to adapt and keep moving forward. Choose a positive course of action. 4 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Emotions will fluctuate. A steady pace will help you reach your goal and ease a stressful situation that is causing confusion. Personal information should be kept a secret. Let your intuition lead the way when dealing with people asking you for something. 2 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A receptive, open approach to whatever is offered will allow you to negotiate until you get exactly what you want. Documentation will help you avoid someone reneging. Stay one step ahead and cover your back and victory will be yours. 5 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Prepare to make amends and do whatever damage control is necessary to avoid a problem with a personal or professional partner. Finding a unique solution that appeases everyone will also re-establish your value and improve your reputation. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Live life to the fullest. Show off and use your charm to capture attention. Travel or visiting unfamiliar places will satisfy your lust for adventure. Embrace any challenge that comes your way with a positive attitude and a healthy ego. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t fall into a financial trap. Making an impulsive move regarding an investment or getting involved in a joint venture isn’t likely to turn out the way you want. Focus on your relationships with others and picking up valuable information. Romance is highlighted. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Acceptance and moderation will be necessary if you want to avoid arguments and interference. Spend more time working on personal improvements and building your assets. Re-evaluate your relationships with others and weed out the people who bring you down. 5 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Rearrange your work space or make changes at home that will inspire you to invest more time in your talents and personal goals. Love is in the stars, and romance will enhance your life. Make a positive change to the way you live. 2 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Go out with people you feel have something to offer or contribute to the goals you have set. Collaborating will lead to changes at home. Initiate a routine that will help you improve your skills and add to your expertise and knowledge. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Stick close to home and don’t ruffle feathers. Consistency and diplomacy will help you divert arguments that are likely to cause confusion and possible repercussions. Nurture an important relationship and revert back to solutions that have worked for you in the past. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Mull over personal, financial or medical issues that need to be resolved. A couple of insightful changes will allow you greater freedom to follow your dreams, hopes and wishes. Revive and update old goals and prepare to present what you have to offer. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Focus on yourself and the improvements you want to make. Setting a personal budget or considering new ways to present and promote what you have to offer will help you achieve financial freedom. Romance is on the rise. 3 stars

Birthday Baby: You are sociable, popular and adaptable. You are sensitive, intuitive and creative.

Eugenia’s websites: Eugenialast.com for confidential consultations, eugenialast.com/blog for Eugenia’s blog, and join Eugenia on Twitter/Facebook/Linkedin

COPYRIGHT 2014 UNIVERSAL UCLICK

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

Powdered alcohols no longer have label approvals

Palcohol said in an email that it agreed to surrender the approvals.The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau is a part of the Treasury Department. in the 1970s says the product is made by absorbing the ethanol onto some sort of carbohydrate powder.On its website, Palcohol says it plans to offer six varieties of powdered alcohol, including vodka, rum and four cocktails .

By CANDICE CHOI AP Food Industry Writer April 22, 2014 11:04AM

Updated: April 22, 2014 11:32AM

NEW YORK ? Don’t expect powdered alcohol to hit store shelves anytime soon.

A product called “Palcohol” gained widespread attention online in recent days after it was reported that the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau approved the powdered alcohol, including vodka and rum varieties. But a representative for the federal bureau, Tom Hogue, said in an email to The Associated Press late Monday that the approvals were issued in error.

Hogue did not immediately respond to requests for further details, including how the error occurred. In an email message, Palcohol’s parent company Lipsmark said “there seemed to be a discrepancy on our fill level, how much powder is in the bag.” It said it will resubmit the labels for approval.

According to the website for the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, multiple varieties of Palcohol received “label approval” on April 8. Palcohol said in an email that it agreed to surrender the approvals.

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau is a part of the Treasury Department.

Robert Lehrman, who runs a beverage law website that initially reported on the product, noted that Palcohol had to have gone through an extensive process before reaching the label approval stage.

“An oversight of this nature does not ring true to me,” Lehrman said in a phone interview. He suggested that the bureau may have heard back from lawmakers wanting more information on the powdered alcohols.

The concept of a powdered alcohol isn’t new. John Coupland, a professor of food science at Penn State University, noted that there have been multiple patents filed on powdered alcohols over the years. One by General Foods Corp. in the 1970s says the product is made by absorbing the ethanol onto some sort of carbohydrate powder.

On its website, Palcohol says it plans to offer six varieties of powdered alcohol, including vodka, rum and four cocktails ? Cosmopolitan, Mojito, Powderita and Lemon Drop. The site says that a package weighs about an ounce and can fit into any pocket. It warns people that the powder should not be snorted.

According to the site, founder Mark Phillips came up with the idea because he is an “active guy” and wanted a way to enjoy an adult beverage after long hours hiking, biking or camping without having to carry around heavy bottles.

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

Bears likely looking long-term at linebacker

So why would the team consider drafting another linebacker. He could give the Bears another option at middle linebacker starting in Round 3. Mosley might be available, and he'd be an ideal long-term middle linebacker. But circumstances figure to prevent the Bears from selecting a linebacker in the first round. Last year, he started every game at strong-side linebacker for the national champions. the Bears would have to be confident Bostic and Greene could start in 2015.

BY PATRICK FINLEY Staff Reporter April 20, 2014 9:01PM

Florida State linebacker Christian Jones runs a drill at the NFL football scouting combine in Indianapolis, Monday, Feb. 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy) ORG XMIT: INMC10

WATCH LIST

Christian Jones, Florida State, 6-3, 240

If the Bears value versatility, Jones might be the perfect pick in the third or fourth round. Last year, he started every game at strong-side linebacker for the national champions. The year before, he started 10 on the weak side and twice in the middle Jones, who fits Phil Emery’s preference for size and athleticism, also played four years of special teams. The Bears would be happy to carve out that role for the rookie.

Five more

Anthony Barr, UCLA, 6-5, 255: He spent his first two college years at running back but has been a revelation since. He’s probably an outside linebacker in a 3-4 scheme and might be gone before No. 14.

Chris Borland, Wisconsin, 5-11, 248: The Big Ten defensive player of the year piles up tackles and forces fumbles, but his small arms and frame could keep him around until the second or third round, where the Bears could draft him as a middle linebacker.

Khalil Mack, Buffalo, 6-3, 251: With an outstanding mid-major resume and top-tier finishes in four combine drills, Mack is nearly a can’t-miss prospect. However, he won’t be available to the Bears unless they trade up.

C.J. Mosley, Alabama, 6-2, 234: The reigning Butkus Award winner “doesn’t get talked about enough,” NFL Network’s Daniel Jeremiah said, and he might be right. Mosley is as instinctive as they come.

Shayne Skov, Stanford, 6-2, 245: Two years removed from a torn anterior cruciate ligament, Skov had 109 tackles for the Cardinal last season. He could give the Bears another option at middle linebacker starting in Round 3.

Tuesday: Quarterbacks

Updated: April 21, 2014 3:26PM

Leading up to the NFL draft, which begins May 8, the Sun-Times will take a position-by-position look at the Bears’ needs and which players might be available to fill them.

Coming off a borderline catastrophic season for their linebackers, the Bears have chosen to rebuild the unit not with new faces but with familiar ones.

The team re-signed D.J. Williams, whom it expects to start at middle linebacker after he suffered a torn pectoral muscle in Week 6 last season.

Weak-side linebacker Lance Briggs is back, too, though he will wear a harness on his left shoulder to protect it after suffering a fracture last season.

And the Shea McClellin experiment will begin at strong-side linebacker, with the former defensive end shifting to compete with second-year player Jon Bostic for the starting job. Neither has played the position in the pros.

Bostic and backup weak-side linebacker Khaseem Greene were among the first four players the Bears drafted last year. So why would the team consider drafting another linebacker?

Think 2015.

Briggs’ contract expires at the end of the season, and Williams is signed to a one-year deal. Even if McClellin shines as a rush-first linebacker ? and that’s no guarantee ? the Bears would have to be confident Bostic and Greene could start in 2015. That seems like a leap.

Bostic was brought in to replace Brian Urlacher, but his move to the outside after one season means he’s more likely to take Lance Briggs’ place. So the Bears still need a long-term middle linebacker.

Bostic and Greene struggled in place of Briggs and Williams last season. From Williams’ injury through the end of the year, Bostic and Greene were given only two positive game grades apiece by Pro Football Focus.

But circumstances figure to prevent the Bears from selecting a linebacker in the first round. The team has other needs ? safety and defensive tackle ? that are more pressing.

It also seems unlikely that either of the two premier linebackers in the draft ? Khalil Mack of Buffalo and Anthony Barr of UCLA ? will last to No. 14.

Alabama’s C.J. Mosley might be available, and he’d be an ideal long-term middle linebacker. But with Williams in the fold, it’s unclear how much Mosley would play this season.

Instead, look for the Bears to find a linebacker starting in the third round. They’ll hope he can provide depth for now and push Bostic and Greene next year, when competition for a starting job could heat up.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @patrickfinley

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

FBI informant on tape hugging man before shooting him: prosecutors

a special FBI agent, Assistant State's Attorney Glen Runk said.Andrews, 37, was caught on tape walking up to Darren Ray on Saturday and giving him a hug in the 2900 block of West Flournoy, Runk said.

BY RUMMANA HUSSAINCriminal Courts Reporter April 22, 2014 2:23PM

Eugene Andrews / photo from Chicago Police

Updated: April 22, 2014 3:41PM

An FBI informant was caught on surveillance video shooting a man he embraced just seconds before he opened fire in an East Garfield Park alley over the weekend, Cook County prosecutors said.

Eugene Andrews, a parolee who is a registered confidential FBI informant on drug cases, was identified as the gunman by his handler ? a special FBI agent, Assistant State’s Attorney Glen Runk said.

Andrews, 37, was caught on tape walking up to Darren Ray on Saturday and giving him a hug in the 2900 block of West Flournoy, Runk said.

Andrews then drove his car into an alley near the same location while Ray, 42, followed on foot, Runk said.

At some point, Andrews got out of his car, pulled a gun out of his waistband and shot Ray twice, Runk said.

Ray was seen on video putting his hands in the air before the shooting, prosecutors said.

Andrews, who was wearing a hat, dark jacket and jeans, was arrested three hours later roughly a half mile from the shooting, Runk said.

He allegedly was in the same car with distinctive black rims that he was in prior to the murder, Runk said.

Andrews was arrested in 1999 on three counts of attempted murder. He was convicted in 2003 and sentenced to 15 years in prison. He was paroled on Dec. 31, 2012.

He also has convictions for illegal weapon possession, drugs and possession of a stolen motor vehicle.

Judge James Brown ordered Andrews, of the 2400 block of West Lexington, held without bond.

Andrews has a tattoo of the Grim Reaper on his lower right arm, a dragon tail on his left arm and a dragon head on his chest, according to a police report.

Contributing: Frank Main

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @rummanahussain

Chicago Sun-Times
22/04
17 Points
1

Vehicle hits Roseland bus stop, 5 injured

| Brian Jackson/Sun-Times Updated: April 22, 2014 10:00PMFive people were hospitalized after a vehicle hit a bus stop Tuesday night in the Roseland neighborhood.About 8:40 p.m., a vehicle traveling north on Michigan Avenue near 103rd Street struck another vehicle, said Larry Langford, a Chicago Fire Department spokesman.

BY SAM CHARLESStaff Reporter April 22, 2014 9:59PM

Five people were injured Tuesday night when a car hit another vehicle and then slammed into a bus stop at 103rd and Michigan in the Roseland neighborhood. | Brian Jackson/Sun-Times

Updated: April 22, 2014 10:00PM

Five people were hospitalized after a vehicle hit a bus stop Tuesday night in the Roseland neighborhood.

About 8:40 p.m., a vehicle traveling north on Michigan Avenue near 103rd Street struck another vehicle, said Larry Langford, a Chicago Fire Department spokesman. The first vehicle then hit the bus stop.

Those who were hospitalized were in the vehicle or standing at the bus stop, Langford said.

One person, whose age and gender was not immediately known, was taken to Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn in serious-to-critical condition, Langford said.

Three women, a 64-year-old and two 25-year-olds, were taken to Roseland Community Hospital in fair-to-serious condition, he said.

A 58-year-old man was taken to Advocate Trinity Hospital, also in fair-to-serious condition, Langford said.

The driver of the vehicle that hit the bus stop declined medical attention.

Police could not say if the driver had been taken into custody.

The CTA rerouted the No. 34 South Michigan, No. 119 Michigan/119th and the No. 106 East 103rd bus routes while authorities investigated.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
14 Points
1

Advocate Lutheran General hosts Suppelsa talk on alcoholism

"I felt something had changed in me," said Suppelsa, who lives on the North Shore with his wife Candus and two children. By Jackie Pilossoph For Sun-Times Media | @divorcedgirljp April 22, 2014 5:25PM Mark Suppelsa, WGN evening news anchor and investigative reporter, spoke on alchoholism and its treatment at Advocate Lutheran General in Park Ridge on April 17.

By Jackie Pilossoph For Sun-Times Media | @divorcedgirljp April 22, 2014 5:25PM

Mark Suppelsa, WGN evening news anchor and investigative reporter, spoke on alchoholism and its treatment at Advocate Lutheran General in Park Ridge on April 17.

“Sneaky, quiet” and “isolated” would not be most people’s words to describe Mark Suppelsa, WGN evening news anchor and investigative reporter. But those are the words Suppelsa used to describe himself when talking about his alcohol addiction before getting help.

Suppelsa will also say he’s an alcoholic who has been in recovery for two years, and who is being open, honest and public about it in an effort to help others.

“I’m a reporter, and what’s the one thing reporters despise about people they are interviewing? Lack of truthfulness,” said Suppelsa, who was the keynote speaker for Advocate Lutheran General’s fundraising event, “An Evening with Mark Suppelsa,” at the Park Ridge hospital on April 17. “It’s in my heart and soul and makeup to be blunt and truthful, which is part of the program, too. It’s the only way for me to be.”

Speaking to an audience of 150, which included doctors, staff at Advocate’s Addiction Treatment Program and the majority, people in need of or in treatment, along with their loved ones, Suppelsa told his story. It began with the first beer he had, which was in college, and culminated decades later, when he was staying up until 3 a.m. to drink bottles of wine by himself, and what happened then.

“I felt something had changed in me,” said Suppelsa, who lives on the North Shore with his wife Candus and two children. “Where you might have that switch in your brain that you can flip off when it’s time to stop drinking, I didn’t have that anymore.”

Suppelsa said it was his wife who “caught him” one night and asked if he needed help.

“Before I could even think about it, I blurted out, ‘Yes, I think I need help,’ and it was a sad moment that turned into an epiphany,” he said. “It was scary because I had just turned over the keys. There was no turning back.”

The following day, Suppelsa entered the well-known treatment facility, Hazelden in Minnesota, and has been sober ever since.

“It’s still not easy, but I feel so much better in so many ways, physically and emotionally. Everything is so much more clear. I’m not feeling tired all the time,” he said. “I actually sleep to get rest now, not to recover from the drinking.”

“An Evening with Mark Suppelsa” was part of the Advocate Addiction Treatment Program’s educational lecture series, and included a silent auction, raffle ticket sales, and a meet and greet with Suppelsa following his speech.

Proceeds from the lecture will provide assistance to those who are unable to seek addiction treatment because of financial issues.

“If I help one person or 10 or 100 by speaking here tonight, that’s wonderful,” Suppelsa said. “If I help them, I’m actually helping myself, too.”

The mission of the Advocate Addiction Treatment Program is to help individuals reclaim all aspects of a balanced life and to return to society empowered to make healthy decisions without the use of alcohol, drugs or other addictive substances. More information: advocatehealth.com/addiction or call (847) 795-3921.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

Bring on the bacon

Waysok, who has participated in Baconfest for four years, has brought several Baconfest creations back to his restaurant . bacon sausage stuffed inside pork belly.Sheerin has been participating in Baconfest since its inception in 2008. Barbara Felt Miller, "Felt Like a Foodie" Felt Miller is one of five contestants who made it to the final round of Baconfest's Amateur Cook-off. The final product combines sushi rice, brown sugar-wasabi candied bacon, egg and green onion.

By Jennifer Fisher For Sun-Times Media April 22, 2014 4:20PM

Bacon-jam-donut-holes | Roger Waysok photo

BACONFEST chicago

April 25-26

UIC Forum, 725 W. Roosevelt

baconfestchicago.com

Updated: April 22, 2014 4:20PM

The smoky smell of bacon and the sound of fat sizzling fills restaurant kitchens around Chicago this month as chefs prepare for the seventh Baconfest Chicago.

The celebration of all things bacon takes place April 25-26 at UIC Forum and will draw hundreds of diehard bacon devotees and some of the biggest culinary talents in the city. We talked to a few chefs who are pulling out all the stops for Baconfest.

Troy Graves, Red Door

Growing up in Iowa, Graves says bacon was simply “sustenance.” But go to Baconfest, and you’ll find the craziest bacon enthusiasts, says the chef at Bucktown gastropub Red Door.

“It’s like the people who are into tattoos and leather,” he says.

This year, Graves will draw on his experience cooking Korean food ? which he learned from an Army barracks mate ? to make bulgogi-glazed pork meatballs with kimchi and bacon broth. He boils kimchi into the broth to impart flavor, then strains it out ? yielding a “pure broth with a pile of porky goodness.”

His advice for home chefs? “Just buy really good bacon. That’s the secret. Start with the best and nothing else really matters.”

Patrick Sheerin, Trenchermen

Sheerin and his staff use Baconfest as a chance to experiment in the kitchen.

The Trenchermen team is making a dish called “Breakfast in Bed,” which pairs bacon cured in ground coffee and braised in whole coffee beans with egg yolk and bacon fat jam and toasted bread made with cocoa nibs.

The coffee-cured, braised bacon is so good, Sheerin says, he’s going to try to find a permanent place for it on the menu at his Wicker Park restaurant, where it will join at least one other Baconfest creation, “bacon-stuffed bacon” ? bacon sausage stuffed inside pork belly.

Sheerin has been participating in Baconfest since its inception in 2008.

Bacon’s just really awesome,” he says. “It’s a lot like sex ? even when it’s really bad, it’s really good.”

Heather Terhune, Sable

Baconfest regular Terhune says she usually tries to choose a dish that fits the theme of Sable Kitchen & Bar, a gastro-lounge serving New American fare. This year, it’s made-to-order cheddar scallion bacon griddlecakes with bourbon apple compote and real maple syrup.

Bacon’s always been a trend. I think people are just now thinking, is it trendy?” says Terhune, who smokes her own bacon at Sable. “We don’t do it because it’s trendy, we do it because it tastes good.”

Jen Templeton, Gingersnap Sweets and Such

Templeton, a vegetarian, hasn’t eaten meat in years. But that doesn’t stop her from using bacon in several of her pastries, including scones, quiche and her signature “whirlaway” rolls.

“My shop smells like bacon a lot,” she admits.

Inspired by a video a friend sent her of a nougat stand in Switzerland, Templeton is working on a “candy shop theme” for Baconfest. She’s already testing batches of nougat made with bacon bits and toasted pecans, for sale all month long at her bakery.

“Nougat tends to be really, really sweet,” she says. “Because of the bacon and pecans, it gives it a really nice salty element.”

Rick Gresh and Jove Hubbard, David Burke’s Primehouse

David Burke’s Primehouse is sending pastry chef Hubbard to Baconfest ? but executive chef Gresh won’t reveal the actual dish.

“We have to keep it somewhat of a secret because of the competition,” Gresh says. “Maybe something with chocolate, maybe not. Maybe Skittles.”

Gresh says he’s participated in Baconfest for six years because it’s fun to see what other chefs are doing, and because he and his staff always have a good time. Making bacon tacos one year, they played a Latin radio station and dressed up in sombreros and woven ponchos.

He also enjoys meeting the bacon junkies who “get teary when they eat stuff.”

For home chefs, Gresh’s No. 1 piece of advice is to “do what your grandmother did and save the fat” ? for cooking vegetables, in vinaigrettes, or even in dough.

Roger Waysok, South Water Kitchen

Bacon goes in everything at the Loop’s South Water Kitchen, from the “Chicago-style” Bloody Marys to the desserts.

Waysok, who has participated in Baconfest for four years, has brought several Baconfest creations back to his restaurant ? including bacon s’mores using homemade marshmallows with chopped bacon whipped in.

This year, Waysok is making bacon jam-filled donut holes drizzled with real maple syrup. “It’s kind of like a jelly donut, but Baconfest style,” he explains.

Barbara Felt Miller, “Felt Like a Foodie”

Felt Miller is one of five contestants who made it to the final round of Baconfest’s Amateur Cook-off. This is her third attempt and her first savory dish: bacon and eggs maki.

Felt Miller loves sushi, but there are few Japanese restaurants near her home in Laporte, Ind. So the food blogger taught herself how to make sushi at home.

“I just kept thinking, how do I incorporate bacon into sushi?” she explains. “I was just obsessed.”

Inspired by the Japanese omelet, tomato, which involves bacon and eggs, Felt Miller spent hours creating different bacon sushi variations. The final product combines sushi rice, brown sugar-wasabi candied bacon, egg and green onion. The roll is wrapped in seaweed and covered in bacon bits and sesame seeds.

Felt Miller is already testing her dish on anyone she can. “We’re doing some work around our house and one of the guys here working, I said, ‘Do you like sushi?’ ‘Never had it.’ ‘Well you need to taste it. ? It’s got bacon on it.’ ”

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
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