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DNA solves murder of man missing since 1978, mistakenly feared to be Gacy victim

Jackson said he punched Beaudion, who then stopped breathing, Breit said. The samples matched those recovered from the body discovered in 2008.Jackson, who was sentenced to four years in prison for the car theft, died in Missouri in 2013.Rodriguez said the DNA match brings relief, but she still wants to know why her brother had to die."I would have asked (Jackson), 'Why did you dump him on the side of the road? Why didn't you bring him to a hospital?'" Rodriguez said, her voice choked with emotion.

BY STEFANO ESPOSITO Staff Reporter April 23, 2014 9:20AM

This undated photo provided by the Edward Beaudion family shows 22-year-old Edward Beaudion of Chicago. The Cook County Sheriff?s Office said it has identified remains found in a forest preserve in 2008 as those of Beaudion.

Updated: April 23, 2014 1:21PM

While he was still in college in the late 1970s, Edward Beaudion dressed up as a vampire to bring a little ghoulish cheer to kids at a local orphanage.

The Northwest Side man was finishing up his degree at Loyola University, thrilled to start teaching elementary kids at St. Andrew School in Lakeview in the fall of 1978.

But just months before he was due to start his job, Beaudion, 22, vanished after returning from a July wedding and dropping off a friend on the Northwest Side.

He was never seen again.

“He loved to teach kids,” said his sister, Ruth Rodriguez, now 62. “He was so excited about his teaching position at St. Andrew’s.”

On Wednesday, the Cook County Sheriff’s Office announced that some remains discovered in 2008 in woods near Lemont are those belonging to Beaudion.

“I don’t have words to even describe it,” said Rodriguez, who got the news in February. “It’s happiness and sadness together.”

The identification confirmed what Rodriguez said she already knew about her brother’s disappearance ? that he was murdered.

No one was ever charged in Beaudion’s death, but a Missouri man, Jerry Jackson, was arrested in his home state in 1978 and later charged with stealing his sister’s Chevrolet Nova, according to sheriff’s spokesman Ben Breit.

Jackson allegedly confessed to arguing with Beaudion, although the details of the confrontation remain unclear, Breit said. Jackson said he punched Beaudion, who then stopped breathing, Breit said. Jackson confessed to putting Beaudion’s body in the Nova and dumping it in the woods near Lemont.

Despite that information, police were unable to find a body and Jackson was never charged in the death, Breit said.

But then in 2008, a family walking in the woods stumbled across a skeleton in “’70s clothing,” Breit said.

It wasn’t until 2011, when Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart announced he was reopening the John Wayne Gacy serial killer investigation, that Rodriguez decided to check to see if her brother might have been a possible victim.

Rodriguez said she was certain Jackson had killed her brother, but she wanted to definitely rule out Gacy.

Rodriguez and her father, Louis Beaudion, submitted DNA samples to the sheriff’s office, which finally came back from a national database earlier this year. The samples matched those recovered from the body discovered in 2008.

Jackson, who was sentenced to four years in prison for the car theft, died in Missouri in 2013.

Rodriguez said the DNA match brings relief, but she still wants to know why her brother had to die.

“I would have asked (Jackson), ‘Why did you dump him on the side of the road? Why didn’t you bring him to a hospital?’” Rodriguez said, her voice choked with emotion.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
17 Points
1

Material on Australian shore examined in jet hunt

Nothing of interest had been found.The 4.5-kilometer (2.8-mile) deep search area is a circle 20 kilometers (12 miles) wide around an area where sonar equipment picked up a signal on April 8 consistent with a plane's black boxes. The hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet will likely soon deploy more powerful sonar equipment that can delve deeper as the current search of the most likely crash site in the Indian Ocean has failed to yield any clues, Australia's defense minister said Wednesday.

By ROD McGUIRK Associated Press April 23, 2014 7:26AM

In this map provided on Wednesday, April 23, 2014, by the Joint Agency Coordination Centre, details are presented in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the southern Indian Ocean. The hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet will likely soon deploy more powerful sonar equipment that can delve deeper as the current search of the most likely crash site in the Indian Ocean has failed to yield any clues, Australia's defense minister said Wednesday. (AP Photo/Joint Agency Coordination Centre) EDITORIAL USE ONLY

Updated: April 23, 2014 9:54AM

CANBERRA, Australia ? Unidentified material that washed ashore in southwestern Australia and is being examined for any link to the lost Malaysian plane is unlikely to have come from the jet, an official said Wednesday.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau was scrutinizing photos of the object, which washed ashore 10 kilometers (6 miles) east of Augusta in Western Australia state. But Martin Dolan, chief commissioner of the safety bureau, said an initial analysis of the material ? which appeared to be sheet metal with rivets ? suggested it was not from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

“We do not consider this likely to be of use to our search for MH370,” Dolan told The Associated Press. “At this stage, we are not getting excited.”

Dolan said the analysis of the material would likely be completed overnight and a formal statement issued Thursday. Augusta is near Australia’s southwestern tip, about 310 kilometers (190 miles) from Perth, where the search has been headquartered.

Meanwhile, Australia’s prime minister said Wednesday that failure to find any clue in the most likely crash site of the lost jet would not spell the end of the search, as officials plan soon to bring in more powerful sonar equipment that can delve deeper beneath the Indian Ocean.

The search coordination center said a robotic submarine, the U.S. Navy’s Bluefin 21, had scanned more than 80 percent of the 310-square kilometer (120-square mile) seabed search zone off the Australian west coast, creating a three-dimensional sonar map of the ocean floor. Nothing of interest had been found.

The 4.5-kilometer (2.8-mile) deep search area is a circle 20 kilometers (12 miles) wide around an area where sonar equipment picked up a signal on April 8 consistent with a plane’s black boxes. But the batteries powering those signals are now believed dead.

Defense Minister David Johnston said Australia was consulting with Malaysia, China and the United States on the next phase of the search for the plane, which disappeared March 8. Details on the next phase are likely to be announced next week.

Johnston said more powerful towed side-scan commercial sonar equipment would probably be deployed, similar to the remote-controlled subs that found RMS Titanic 3,800 meters (12,500 feet) under the Atlantic Ocean in 1985 and the Australian WWII wreck HMAS Sydney in the Indian Ocean off the Australian coast, north of the current search area, in 2008.

“The next phase, I think, is that we step up with potentially a more powerful, more capable side-scan sonar to do deeper water,” Johnston told the AP.

While the Bluefin had less than one-fifth of the seabed search area to complete, Johnston estimated that task would take another two weeks.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said the airliner’s probable impact zone was 700 kilometers (430 miles) long and 80 kilometers (50 miles) wide. A new search strategy would be adopted if nothing is found in the current seabed search zone.

“If at the end of that period we find nothing, we are not going to abandon the search, we may well rethink the search, but we will not rest until we have done everything we can to solve this mystery,” Abbott told reporters.

“We owe it to the families of the 239 people on board, we owe it to the hundreds of millions ? indeed billions ? of people who travel by air to try to get to the bottom of this. The only way we can get to the bottom of this is to keep searching the probable impact zone until we find something or until we have searched it as thoroughly as human ingenuity allows at this time,” he said.

The focus of the next search phase will be decided by continuing analysis of information including flight data and sound detections of the suspected beacons, Johnston said.

“A lot of this seabed has not even been hydrographically surveyed before ? some of it has ? but we’re flying blind,” he said, adding that the seabed in the vicinity of the search was up to 7 kilometers (4 miles) deep.

The search center said an air search involving 10 planes was suspended for a second day because of heavy seas and poor visibility.

But 12 ships would join Wednesday’s search of an expanse covering 38,000 square kilometers (14,500 square miles), centered 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) northwest of Perth.

Radar and satellite data show the jet veered far off course on March 8 for unknown reasons during its flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing. An analysis indicates it would have run out of fuel in the remote section of ocean where the search has been focused. Not one piece of confirmed debris has been found since the massive multinational hunt began.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
10 Points
1

Bulls lose first two games at home; Wizards earn OT win

They got it to overtime and won it.''What hurt even more was the Bulls had been 18-for-22 from the free throw line before Hinrich's misses."Yeah, I was surprised,'' Gibson said of Hinrich missing the first free throw. "Things like that are going to happen. They're watching a great regular season suddenly put on life support."Just regroup, go back to the film,'' Bulls forward Taj Gibson said. "It feels like we're a fingernail short every time.

BY JOE COWLEY Staff Reporter April 22, 2014 10:46PM

Updated: April 23, 2014 12:46AM

It was the young, upstart Washington Wizards that were supposed to wilt late in games, when the spotlight shines the brightest.

As far as physical play, it was the Wizards that were expected to be spending extra time in the ice tub after games.

And by the time the best-of-seven first-round series was headed to the nation’s capital on Friday, it was supposed to be the Wizards that were down 0-2, backs uncomfortably against the wall, searching for answers.

Following the 101-99 overtime loss at the United Center, the Bulls couldn’t have been more wrong in every department.

Thanks to 26 points from second-year guard Bradley Beal, and six straight points from Nene in the overtime, Washington has full control of the series, up two games and rolling back home.

The Bulls?

They’re watching a great regular season suddenly put on life support.

“Just regroup, go back to the film,’’ Bulls forward Taj Gibson said. “It feels like we’re a fingernail short every time. A couple plays here and there, a couple tough calls, but got to play through it.

“It’s the playoffs, it’s a 12-round fight.’’

And right now, it’s a fight that’s close to being stopped.

Not that the Bulls didn’t have their chances. After falling behind as much as 17 points in the first half, there was Kirk Hinrich, standing at the free throw line with 2.4 seconds left with a chance to make both and send it into a second overtime.

Hinrich missed the first, and then tried to purposely miss the second with the Bulls hoping for a prayer. It wasn’t answered.

“I went up there thinking I would knock them down,’’ Hinrich said. “I just couldn’t do it. However, I really felt that I should have made the layup [that drew the foul]. I was not fatigued. That was not a factor for me.

“Just give them credit. They did a great job defensively. They got it to overtime and won it.’’

What hurt even more was the Bulls had been 18-for-22 from the free throw line before Hinrich’s misses.

“Yeah, I was surprised,’’ Gibson said of Hinrich missing the first free throw. “Things like that are going to happen. He’s a tremendous player. He’s been great for us all year long, been in that situation many times. If that happened in that time again, I would still go with Kirk. He’s one of the captains on this team, one of the veterans on this team. I was just a little shocked when he missed, but it happens like that, he’s human.’’

The bigger issue for the Bulls was once again extended scoring lulls. They built the lead up to 10 in the fourth with 6:59 left, but scored just four points until the horn went off to send it to overtime.

“Hard-fought,’’ coach Tom Thibodeau said. “We dug ourselves a big hole early, expended a lot of energy to get out of that hole, and came up short.

“I thought we had some good looks. Got to do better. It’s going to come down to we had the lead in both fourth quarters, didn’t close it out.’’

All of a sudden, all that talk about life being just fine without Derrick Rose or Luol Deng ? basically a go-to offensive player ? has become a lot quieter.

“I’m not sure,’’ Joakim Noah said, when asked how it will turnaround. “But we have to find a way. Throughout the year, it hasn’t been pretty at times. But we’re a team that finds a way. The last two games, we fell short. We’re disappointed. But we’re not going to stop fighting.’’

Email: [email protected]

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
16 Points
1

8 injured in less than 7 hours in gun violence across city

He was taken to Saint Bernard Hospital and Health Care Center in good condition, police said.Just after 5 p.m., a 24-year-old man was shot while sitting on his porch in the 6700 block of South Oakley Avenue in the Chicago Lawn neighborhood. He was on a porch in the 1700 block of West 71st Street when someone ran out of a gangway and opened fire, striking the man, police said. Someone walked out of a gangway and opened fire, striking the man under his right arm, police said.

BY SAM CHARLESStaff Reporter April 22, 2014 9:00PM

Updated: April 22, 2014 9:03PM

One day after Mayor Rahm Emanuel decried the rash of shootings over the Easter holiday weekend, eight people were shot across the city in less than seven hours.

The ages of the victims ? one teenager and seven men ? ranged from 14 to 56.

In the most recent incident, a 23-year-old man was wounded about 7:30 p.m. in the West Englewood neighborhood, Chicago Police said. He was on a porch in the 1700 block of West 71st Street when someone ran out of a gangway and opened fire, striking the man, police said. He was taken to Holy Cross Hospital in good condition.

About 7 p.m., a 56-year-old man was shot in his knee in the 1800 block of South Central Park Avenue in the North Lawndale neighborhood. He was taken to Mount Sinai Hospital in good condition.

About 6:40 p.m., a 14-year-old boy was shot in the Chicago Lawn neighborhood on the South Side. He was standing on a porch in the 7300 block of South Maplewood Avenue when suspects ran out from across the street and started shooting, police said. He was taken to Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn in good condition.

About 5:50 p.m., a 29-year-old man was shot in the ankle in the 7500 block of South Yale Avenue in the Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood. He was taken to Saint Bernard Hospital and Health Care Center in good condition, police said.

Just after 5 p.m., a 24-year-old man was shot while sitting on his porch in the 6700 block of South Oakley Avenue in the Chicago Lawn neighborhood. Someone walked out of a gangway and opened fire, striking the man under his right arm, police said. He was taken to Christ Medical Center.

About 4 p.m., a 23-year-old man was shot in the Logan Square neighborhood on the Northwest Side. He was in a vehicle in the 3600 block of West Armitage Avenue when another vehicle drove up and someone from inside opened fire, police said. He was taken to Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in serious condition. The shooting was thought to be gang-related, according to a police source.

About the same time, a 20-year-old man was shot in the ankle and back in the 1600 block of West 59th Street in West Englewood, police said. The man went to Holy Cross Hospital, police said.

The day’s first shooting occurred about 1:10 p.m. in the Roseland neighborhood on the Far South Side. An 18-year-old man walked into Roseland Community Hospital with a gunshot wound in his wrist and told police he had been shot in the 200 block of West 112th Street. He was listed in good condition.

No one was in custody in any of the shootings. Area detectives were investigating.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
17 Points
1

Dentists say more adults seeking straighter teeth for better smile

"I have really found that the treatment time for orthodontic treatment can be cut in half with AcceleDent if instructions are followed," Ibrahim says. "AcceleDent has absolutely changed orthodontic treatment," she claims.Zimmer notes there are also some less complicated treatment options. She is one of a growing number of adults who are deciding to undergo orthodontic treatment. "Every day for 20 minutes, I put this small mouthpiece in my mouth and turn it on," DeAno says.

By Judy Buchenot For Sun-Times Media April 21, 2014 3:48PM

Today there are many options for orthodontic treatment from the traditional stainless steel brackets to nearly invisible Invisalign trays. | Judy Buchenot~For Sun-Times Media

By the numbers

The American Association of Orthodontists reports that the number of adult orthodontic patients increased 14 percent in a two-year period from 2010 to 2012 for a total of 1,225,850 adult patients. An increasing number of adult men are seeking treatment also. The number of men in braces rose 29 percent from 2010 to 2012. As of 2012, 44 percent of adults seeking orthodontic treatment were male.

Updated: April 23, 2014 2:48AM

Stacie White still recalls how smooth her teeth felt after having the stainless steel brackets of her braces removed from her teeth a year ago.

“They felt so smooth, and my teeth are beautiful now,” the Oswego resident says. “I love my smile.”

Unlike most orthodontic patients, White is not in her teens. She is one of a growing number of adults who are deciding to undergo orthodontic treatment.

“It took me 30 years to get the courage to do something about the gaps between my teeth,” White says. “I was 42 years old when I got them on. I found that most people would notice they were there and then forget about it. Now that I am done, I am absolutely glad that I did this.”

The American Association of Orthodontists reports that the number of adult orthodontic patients increased 14 percent in a two-year period from 2010 to 2012 for a total of more than 1.2 million adult patients.

Dr. Jacqueline Zimmer of Prairie View Orthodontics sees patients in Batavia, Aurora and Oswego. She has seen a steady flow of adult patients in her practice.

“I would say that, about 75 percent of the time, adults are coming in for cosmetic reasons,” she says.

She says her patients tell her how their families could not afford braces or how some patients refused treatment when they were younger.

Other adults seek treatment to help with more serious issues.

“If a person has missing teeth from a failed root canal or other issues and needs an implant, the rest of the teeth need to be in alignment for the implant,” Zimmer says. “Other patients may have problems with their teeth wearing down due to poorly positioned teeth. In these cases, there is a partnership with the dentist, periodontist or oral surgeon to address the problems.”

One concern of adult patients is the appearance of braces, but today, there are other options beyond the traditional stainless steel brackets.

“There are now ceramic braces that are tooth colored. Most of the wires are still visible but, in combination with the ceramic bracket, offer a much more esthetic option,” Zimmer says.

“Also, Invisalign treatment straightens the teeth without brackets or wires. They utilize a series of clear plastic shells that are worn over the teeth to gradually align the teeth. They are taken out to eat and floss.”

Emily DeAno, 27, of Naperville, started her Invisalign treatment in December at the Naperville location of Innovative Orthodontic Centers.

“I have always wanted a better smile,” the mom says. “I thought that, since I have a cross bite and over crowding of teeth, I would have to have regular braces, but I found out that I can use Invisalign. There was a short adjustment period, but now, I don’t even feel they are on. Hardly anyone ever notices them.”

DeAno is using AcceleDent in conjunction with Invisalign. She says she can almost feel her teeth moving when she uses it.

“Every day for 20 minutes, I put this small mouthpiece in my mouth and turn it on,” DeAno says. “It sort of vibrates. When I take it off, my Invisaligns fit better, and I can tell my teeth have moved a little.”

She says she can wear it while watching TV or driving. And it’s painless.

“In fact, it is pain relieving for me,” DeAno says. “The vibration sort of soothes things.”

Dr. Manal Ibrahim of Innovative Orthodontic Centers has been offering AcceleDent to her patients for about nine months.

“I have really found that the treatment time for orthodontic treatment can be cut in half with AcceleDent if instructions are followed,” Ibrahim says. “This is very appealing to adults who want the treatment to be over with as soon as possible.”

She explains that the FDA-cleared medical device looks like a mouthpiece. Patients bite down on the device, which sends out pulses for 20 minutes. A timer sounds when 10 minutes have passed and then the device shuts off automatically.

“The soft pulsing is super gentle and offers less vibration than an electric toothbrush,” Ibrahim says.

“It cuts down on tooth movement discomfort or sensitivity. Some patients say it is like a massager for the teeth. Some patients even say it puts them to sleep because it is so relaxing.”

The results have been very positive, according to Ibrahim.

“Patients are amazed at how rapidly the treatment goes,” she explains. “I have found that the teeth move more quickly and predictably with AcceleDent. It is great for morale and compliance since patients see a change.”

The cost of adding AcceleDent to an orthodontic treatment is usually less than $1,000, and most insurance companies do not provide coverage for it. Ibrahim says that this might change in the future.

“AcceleDent has absolutely changed orthodontic treatment,” she claims.

Zimmer notes there are also some less complicated treatment options.

“Some issues like a single tooth that is out of line can be addressed with just a spring retainer,” Zimmer says. “Sometimes all that is needed are braces on the bottom teeth.”

She says getting an evaluation is key.

“There are a few things that are harder to correct in adults than in children, but there are many options so it is worth getting an evaluation,” Zimmer says.

The cost for orthodontic treatment varies depending on a patient’s needs. The costs can range from $250 for a simple retainer to $2,800 to $6,000 for Invisalign, ceramic braces, stainless steel braces and other treatment options.

Both orthodontists remind adults that it is never too late to explore the possibility of having a great smile.

“I know that there is a large movement of adults looking for a beautiful smile with straight teeth,” Ibrahim says. “It increases confidence and makes people happier.”

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

Bee-friendly garden can help struggling species

Rethink the use of herbicides, which reduce pollinator food sources by removing flowers from the landscape. "I worry in particular about pollinator species with limited ranges and that have unique habitat requirements that are being threatened. A lot of species are dropping out of the landscape."You don't have to become a beekeeper to restore or boost bee populations. Plant flowers and create green spaces, especially in urban areas. They provide instant habitat and can be built on the cheap.

By DEAN FOSDICK Associated Press April 23, 2014 12:40PM

Gardeners can encourage bees by adding plants that flower both early and late in the season. | AP Photo/Dean Fosdick

Bees are pulling a disappearing act. Honeybees are vanishing from their hives. Bumblebee numbers have crashed so radically that some species are believed extinct. Even native solitary bees are in decline. Food supplies dependent upon pollinators are threatened.

But gardeners can help.

There is no single explanation for what is causing the pollinator losses, said Matt O’Neal, an associate professor of entomology at Iowa State University.

“There are multiple sources of stress,” he said. “There are your basic pests, also pathogens like viruses, pesticide exposure and land use practices reducing the kinds of forages bees can feed on. It looks like a combination of all those.”

As insect pollinators, bees broaden our diets beyond meats and wind-pollinated grains. An estimated one-third of all foods and beverages are made possible by pollination, mainly by honeybees, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says. Pollinators also are essential for flowering plants and entire plant communities.

“Common species are disappearing at a dramatic rate. I’m terrified in the extreme,” said Mace Vaughan, pollinator program director with The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation in Portland, Ore. “I worry in particular about pollinator species with limited ranges and that have unique habitat requirements that are being threatened. A lot of species are dropping out of the landscape.”

You don’t have to become a beekeeper to restore or boost bee populations. Gardeners can:

? Plant flowers and create green spaces, especially in urban areas. Leave patches of bare soil, rocks and brush piles for use by ground-dwelling native bees. Add caterpillar host plants. “Provide pollen and nectar throughout the (growing) season,” O’Neal said. “Plant the right habitat.”

? Install bee hotels around the yard by drilling holes in wood blocks and creating reed or bamboo bundles. They provide instant habitat and can be built on the cheap. “Another thing you can do is plant woody plants (elderberries, raspberries, sumac) with branches that have soft insides,” Vaughan said. “Grow these shrubs up and then cut them back to expose the stems. Carpenter and mason bees will nest in them.”

? Eliminate or change the way you apply pesticides. Don’t use them on plants that are blooming. Apply them at night when bees are less active. Spray from ground level to reduce drift, and create buffer zones next to agricultural areas. Rethink the use of herbicides, which reduce pollinator food sources by removing flowers from the landscape.

? Add signage to advertise the presence of pollinators. Bees often range several miles from their hives or nests. Place pollinator habitat signs around pastures, community gardens, city parks, bike trails or suburban yards to promote conservation.

What it comes down to is providing a few important things, Vaughan said: “Plant wildflowers that provide a high succession of bloom. Have home gardens free of chemicals. Get into natural gardening.”

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

Toyota sells 2.58 million vehicles, outselling GM

1 selling automaker for more than seven decades before losing the title to Toyota in 2008.GM retook the sales crown in 2011, when Toyota's production was hurt by the quake and tsunami in northeastern Japan. Toyota kept its position at the top in global vehicle sales for the first quarter of this year, outpacing rivals General Motors and Volkswagen.Toyota Motor Corp. finished second and VW third.Toyota is targeting sales of more than 10 million vehicles this year.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS April 23, 2014 7:46AM

Toyota Motor Corp. kept its position at the top in global vehicle sales for the first quarter of this year, outpacing rivals General Motors and Volkswagen. Toyota said Wednesday it sold a record 2.583 million vehicles. | AP file photo

TOKYO ? Toyota kept its position at the top in global vehicle sales for the first quarter of this year, outpacing rivals General Motors and Volkswagen.

Toyota Motor Corp. said Wednesday that it sold a record 2.583 million vehicles in the January-March period, putting the Japanese automaker ahead of Detroit-based GM at 2.42 million and Volkswagen of Germany at 2.4 million.

Toyota’s first quarter sales rose by more than 6 percent from the same period the previous year. GM’s sales grew 2 percent, while Volkswagen’s added nearly 6 percent.

Toyota finished first last year with a record 9.98 million vehicles in sales, remaining the top-selling automaker for a second year in a row. General Motors Co. finished second and VW third.

Toyota is targeting sales of more than 10 million vehicles this year. No automaker has sold that many in a year. Toyota officials say being No. 1 is not that important, and they want to be No. 1 in customer satisfaction.

But competition is intense among all the world’s automakers, and clinching the top-selling automaker crown is not taken lightly.

By region, Toyota’s first quarter sales grew in Japan as consumers rushed to buy ahead of a rise in the sales tax, which kicked in April 1. Its sales also grew in the rest of Asia, the Middle East, South America and Africa, according to Toyota.

General Motors had been the No. 1 selling automaker for more than seven decades before losing the title to Toyota in 2008.

GM retook the sales crown in 2011, when Toyota’s production was hurt by the quake and tsunami in northeastern Japan. But the maker of the Prius hybrid, Camry sedan and Lexus luxury model made a comeback in 2012, and kept that lead in 2013.

GM’s image has taken a hit after a February recall of 2.6 million vehicles for defective ignition switches, a defect the company tied to 13 deaths.

GM and the U.S. government are investigating why it took the company more than a decade to recall the cars after engineers first learned of the switch problems.

Toyota also underwent a massive recall debacle in the U.S., announcing recall after recall starting in 2009. It paid a $1.2 billion earlier this year to settle a U.S. Justice Department investigation into charges of covering up problems that caused unintended acceleration in some cars.

From 2010 through 2012, Toyota paid fines totaling more than $66 million for delays in reporting safety problems. Toyota agreed last year to pay more than $1 billion to owners of its cars who claimed to have suffered economic losses because of the recalls. The company still faces wrongful death and injury lawsuits.

Volkswagen is growing so quickly in China and other relatively new markets it is close on the heels of its two longtime rivals.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

Procter & Gamble 3Q profit edges up, revenue slips

Lafley returned to the company help in May, Procter & Gamble Co. Wall Street expected $20.68 billion.P&G now foresees full-year adjusted earnings climbing 3 percent to 5 percent. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS April 23, 2014 7:54AM Procter & Gamble Co.'s fiscal third-quarter net income rose 2 percent as it cut costs to offset sluggish sales in categories like beauty and family products.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS April 23, 2014 7:54AM

Procter & Gamble Co.’s fiscal third-quarter net income rose 2 percent as it cut costs to offset sluggish sales in categories like beauty and family products. | AP file photo

CINCINNATI ? Procter & Gamble Co.’s fiscal third-quarter net income rose 2 percent as it cut costs to offset sluggish sales in categories like beauty and family products.

The world’s largest consumer product maker’s adjusted earnings topped analysts’ estimates, but revenue fell short. The company cut its 2014 adjusted earnings forecast on Wednesday.

Since CEO A.G. Lafley returned to the company help in May, Procter & Gamble Co. has been focusing on its most profitable markets and products and introducing new products. It sold off most of its pet care business earlier this month for $2.9 billion.

“We’re operating in a slow-growth, highly competitive environment, which places even greater importance on strong innovation and productivity improvement,” Lafley said in a statement.

The Cincinnati-based company’s turnaround plan also includes cutting costs to save $10 billion by fiscal 2016.

For the three months ended March 31, the maker of Tide detergent and Gillette razors earned $2.61 billion, or 90 cents per share. That compares with $2.57 billion, or 88 cents per share, last year.

Excluding restructuring charges and other items, earnings were $1.04 per share. Analysts’ forecast $1.02 per share.

Revenue totaled $20.56 billion, down slightly from last year’s $20.6 billion on foreign currency fluctuations. Wall Street expected $20.68 billion.

P&G now foresees full-year adjusted earnings climbing 3 percent to 5 percent. Its prior outlook was for 5 percent to 7 percent growth.

The stock fell 40 cents to $80.85 in premarket trading about two hours ahead of the market open.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

US stocks edge lower after a six-day rally

KB Home fell 44 cents, or 3 percent, to $16.10 and Ryland Group fell $1.28, or 3 percent, to $36.91.GAME OF SHOWS: Netflix fell $15.60, or 4 percent, to $357.21. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 21 points, or 0.1 percent, to 16,495 and the Nasdaq composite lost 20 points, or 0.5 percent, to 4,141.ROBOT REPAIR: Surgical robot make Intuitive Surgical dropped $41.40, or 10 percent, to $381.18 after the company reported a 77 percent drop in first-quarter earnings.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS April 23, 2014 9:08AM

The stock market slipped Wednesday after rallying for six straight days as investors worked through another round of quarterly earnings reports from U.S. companies.| AP file photo

Updated: April 23, 2014 11:33AM

NEW YORK ? The stock market slipped Wednesday, after rising for six straight days, as investors worked through another round of quarterly earnings reports from U.S. companies. Intuitive Surgical was among those announcing disappointed results. A worse-than-expected report on the housing market also weighed on the broader market.

KEEPING SCORE: The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell one point, or 0.1 percent, to 1,878 as of 12:05 p.m. Eastern time. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 21 points, or 0.1 percent, to 16,495 and the Nasdaq composite lost 20 points, or 0.5 percent, to 4,141.

ROBOT REPAIR: Surgical robot make Intuitive Surgical dropped $41.40, or 10 percent, to $381.18 after the company reported a 77 percent drop in first-quarter earnings. Intuitive Surgical sold only half has many robots in the last quarter as it did in the same period a year earlier. The company warned two weeks ago that earnings would come in far below expectations, causing its stock to fall sharply from a recent high of $540.63 reached April 3.

FLYING HIGHER: Airline stocks were among the biggest advancers. Delta Air Lines rose $1.80, or 5 percent, to $36.68. Delta’s first-quarter earnings climbed after the company filled more seats on its planes and paid less for fuel. Boeing rose $3.25, or 2.5 percent, to $130.80. The company’s quarterly earnings beat expectations as it boosted airplane production.

AND ON THE SEVENTH DAY...The S&P 500 had risen six days in a row before Wednesday. It is not unusual for the stock market to pause after such a rally, investors said.

THE $84,000 PILL: Gilead Sciences rose $2.56, or 4 percent, to $75.41 after the company reported a surge in first-quarter earnings. Gilead’s drug Sovaldi, a new treatment for Hepatitis C, had $2.3 billion in sales in the first quarter alone, which beat the record for any drug in its first whole year on the market. While Sovaldi has a 90 percent success rate in curing Hepatitis C, the drug has a price of $1,000 per pill, or around $84,000 for a typical course of treatment.

HOUSING STALL: The Commerce Department said that new home sales fell 15 percent in March, their worst level in nearly a year. The number of home sold slowed to an annual rate of 384,000, well below economists’ forecasts of 450,000. The news hit homebuilder stocks hard. KB Home fell 44 cents, or 3 percent, to $16.10 and Ryland Group fell $1.28, or 3 percent, to $36.91.

GAME OF SHOWS: Netflix fell $15.60, or 4 percent, to $357.21. Time Warner and Amazon.com announced that HBO’s award-winning shows such as “The Sopranos” and “Six Feet Under” would be available exclusively for Amazon Prime subscribers, a big loss for Netflix. HBO had been one of the biggest holdouts in bringing its content to streaming video services. Time Warner rose 96 cents, or 2 percent, to $65.89.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

Bulls need Joakim Noah to dominate vs. Wizards

Noah gets those while lounging (which he never does). They chatted, but Noah had little to learn from Rose.His mojo just wasn't in full bloom yet. Then they gave it all back.Overtime came around because the Bulls once again let the Wizards own the end of the game.Noah's enthusiasm and mix-master frenzy is needed. Indeed, he has 170 career double-doubles.Against the Wizards, it's clear that Noah has to dominate the way he can when he is locked in like a maniac on the task at hand.

BY RICK TELANDERSports Columnist April 22, 2014 11:02PM

Updated: April 23, 2014 12:13PM

On a very bad night, it was good to remember that Joakim Noah was made for Chicago.

This is a town that appreciates effort ? and that’s what the Bulls center will give you.

He was outscored by teammates Taj Gibson and D.J. Augustin on Tuesday night in a gut-wrenching 101-99 overtime loss to the Wizards. But he wasn’t outhustled. He was, however, beat.

The Bulls looked ? as a team ? terrified to finish out. They looked afraid. They looked like they abruptly realized they aren’t really as good as the lower-ranked Wizards.

Word is Jimmy Butler played, but we should pray it was a playground kid in a Jimmy Butler suit.

Shooting guards shoot, right? I’m not sure how it’s possible to play 53 minutes and score only six points and have but two assists. No sense in trashing young Butler, really. It would have been nice for Kirk Hinrich to have made a couple of free throws at the end, too.

Down 0-2 after two games on your home court. Go figure.

Can the Bulls win four of the next five games? Only if Noah can somehow ratchet up to superman level.

His 20 points, 12 rebounds, three assists and two blocked shots were pretty darned good. He was even 4-for-4 from the free-throw line. But he has been abandoned, it seems.

Early on in his seven-year career with the Bulls, Noah sometimes expended his effort doing nothing much of value. He started out his first two years averaging 1.2 assists and 6.7 points. His rebounds ? 5.6 per game, then 7.6 ? weren’t much for a 6-11 guy with long arms.

And then ? whiz, bang! ? maturity. Focus. Intensity. Adulthood.

In four of the last five seasons, Noah has averaged a double-double, just missing it in 2011-12 when he averaged 9.8 points and 10.2 rebounds. His minutes increased because of his improvement, and this season he grabbed a career-high 99 steals and handed out a crazy 431 assists.

That Noah received the Defensive Player of the Year award Monday is fitting, but in many ways, it’s an award that simply acknowledges his overall status as a fully-fledged game-changer.

How many centers ever get a triple-double in points, rebounds and assists? Noah had four this season.

Double-doubles? Noah gets those while lounging (which he never does). Indeed, he has 170 career double-doubles.

Against the Wizards, it’s clear that Noah has to dominate the way he can when he is locked in like a maniac on the task at hand. Maybe like two maniacs.

In the first quarter, he came out of the game and sat next to nicely dressed but inactive former superstar Derrick Rose. They chatted, but Noah had little to learn from Rose.

His mojo just wasn’t in full bloom yet. A 26-12 lead by the Wizards seemed as mysterious to Noah as it was to observers. The Bulls were out of sync, flat, listless.

Then they took the lead. Then they gave it all back.

Overtime came around because the Bulls once again let the Wizards own the end of the game.

Noah’s enthusiasm and mix-master frenzy is needed. But he can’t do it all. He’s a center, after all, not a one, two, three or four.

Noah had not wanted any publicity after his award presentation, deflecting all praise and thanking his teammates. He was trying desperately to stay focused on the task at hand. The award could sit somewhere and gather dust for all he cared.

After Game 1, when a couple of players were horrendous on defense and Noah’s usual double-double seemed irrelevant, coach Tom Thibodeau said he would not blame one player, that this was a team affair.

“To put it on one guy, that’s not how we do it here,” Thibodeau said. “I could go from start to finish.’’

Said Wizards coach Randy Wittman after Washington’s Game 2 victory: ‘‘I’m an old-school coach. I come from Bobby Knight. I believe you have to play defense.’’

Is that the problem? The Bulls don’t play defense?

Scoring in the clutch helps, too. But even that might not be enough now.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @ricktelander

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

Kristin Davis, now on new TV show, can’t escape Charlotte’s web

Her new role as Ginny has her playing the thorn-in-the-side of Meredith (Ari Graynor of "Fringe") . "Ginny is kind of angry. Kind of stressed out."Kind of the opposite of Davis, a self-described bohemian who's quick to giggle and doesn't take things too seriously."I'm way more of a slob than both Ginny and Charlotte," said the mother of a toddler who's busy doing eight shows a week in London. think a younger Samantha who prefers to marry into money rather than to make it herself.

By LORI RACKL TV Critic April 22, 2014 1:32PM

Kristin Davis plays the Type A Ginny on "Bad Teacher." | CBS

Updated: April 22, 2014 7:59PM

Kristin Davis, best known from her years spent as Charlotte on “Sex and the City,” returns to series television Thursday in the new CBS comedy “Bad Teacher.”

She plays Ginny, a prim, Type-A, uppity instructor. With a penchant for ponytails. And cardigans.

Sound familiar?

“I looked at myself in the mirror one day and I was like, ‘Oh my gosh I can’t believe it; I tried not to do this,’” said Davis, 49, in a phone interview from London, where she’s making her West End debut in the play “Fatal Attraction.”

“You go to do a new character and I always say, ‘I don’t want to wear pink, I don’t want to wear Charlotte colors,’ ” she added. “In the end, everyone’s like, ‘Oh, it’s like Charlotte.’ That’s what happens when you play a character for as long as I played [her].”

For six seasons and two feature films, Davis was one-fourth of the cosmo-sipping, man-eating quartet on the memorable HBO series.

Her new role as Ginny has her playing the thorn-in-the-side of Meredith (Ari Graynor of “Fringe”) ? think a younger Samantha who prefers to marry into money rather than to make it herself. Ginny is not amused by her co-worker’s seductive style.

Ginny is like Charlotte if Charlotte didn’t have a happy life,” Davis said. “Ginny is kind of angry. Kind of stressed out.”

Kind of the opposite of Davis, a self-described bohemian who’s quick to giggle and doesn’t take things too seriously.

“I’m way more of a slob than both Ginny and Charlotte,” said the mother of a toddler who’s busy doing eight shows a week in London.

She’s filmed 13 episodes of “Bad Teacher,” premiering at 8:30 p.m. Thursday on WBBM-Channel 2. The series is based on the 2011 Cameron Diaz film by the same name.

While the main character is indeed a bad teacher, she can also be a good influence ? much like Davis’ real-life high-school drama instructor in South Carolina.

“He didn’t really follow the rules, sometimes in bad ways,” Davis said, declining to elaborate. “But on the other hand he was very inspiring and passionate about what he did.”

She credits him with helping her become a professional actor, a career whose perks called for a few dreamy weeks in French Polynesia while shooting Vince Vaughn’s 2009 comedy “Couples Retreat.”

“We’d been in Bora Bora for a month, which was of course beautiful, hot weather,” she said. “Then we had to fly to Chicago in January and shoot outside the airport in the snow ? because Vince Vaughn always wants to shoot in Chicago for every movie. We were really mad at him. And did that scene end up in the movie? No, it did not.”

Might another movie ? one that ends with a “3” and allows Davis to reprise her best-known role ? be in the offing?

“I wish I knew,” she said. “The stars have to align perfectly. It’s never easy ? but I’m hopeful.”

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @lorirackl

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

Bulls need Joakim Noah to dominate vs. Wizards

Noah gets those while lounging (which he never does). They chatted, but Noah had little to learn from Rose.His mojo just wasn't in full bloom yet. Then they gave it all back.Overtime came around because the Bulls once again let the Wizards own the end of the game.Noah's enthusiasm and mix-master frenzy is needed. Indeed, he has 170 career double-doubles.Against the Wizards, it's clear that Noah has to dominate the way he can when he is locked in like a maniac on the task at hand.

BY RICK TELANDERSports Columnist April 22, 2014 11:02PM

Updated: April 23, 2014 12:13PM

On a very bad night, it was good to remember that Joakim Noah was made for Chicago.

This is a town that appreciates effort ? and that’s what the Bulls center will give you.

He was outscored by teammates Taj Gibson and D.J. Augustin on Tuesday night in a gut-wrenching 101-99 overtime loss to the Wizards. But he wasn’t outhustled. He was, however, beat.

The Bulls looked ? as a team ? terrified to finish out. They looked afraid. They looked like they abruptly realized they aren’t really as good as the lower-ranked Wizards.

Word is Jimmy Butler played, but we should pray it was a playground kid in a Jimmy Butler suit.

Shooting guards shoot, right? I’m not sure how it’s possible to play 53 minutes and score only six points and have but two assists. No sense in trashing young Butler, really. It would have been nice for Kirk Hinrich to have made a couple of free throws at the end, too.

Down 0-2 after two games on your home court. Go figure.

Can the Bulls win four of the next five games? Only if Noah can somehow ratchet up to superman level.

His 20 points, 12 rebounds, three assists and two blocked shots were pretty darned good. He was even 4-for-4 from the free-throw line. But he has been abandoned, it seems.

Early on in his seven-year career with the Bulls, Noah sometimes expended his effort doing nothing much of value. He started out his first two years averaging 1.2 assists and 6.7 points. His rebounds ? 5.6 per game, then 7.6 ? weren’t much for a 6-11 guy with long arms.

And then ? whiz, bang! ? maturity. Focus. Intensity. Adulthood.

In four of the last five seasons, Noah has averaged a double-double, just missing it in 2011-12 when he averaged 9.8 points and 10.2 rebounds. His minutes increased because of his improvement, and this season he grabbed a career-high 99 steals and handed out a crazy 431 assists.

That Noah received the Defensive Player of the Year award Monday is fitting, but in many ways, it’s an award that simply acknowledges his overall status as a fully-fledged game-changer.

How many centers ever get a triple-double in points, rebounds and assists? Noah had four this season.

Double-doubles? Noah gets those while lounging (which he never does). Indeed, he has 170 career double-doubles.

Against the Wizards, it’s clear that Noah has to dominate the way he can when he is locked in like a maniac on the task at hand. Maybe like two maniacs.

In the first quarter, he came out of the game and sat next to nicely dressed but inactive former superstar Derrick Rose. They chatted, but Noah had little to learn from Rose.

His mojo just wasn’t in full bloom yet. A 26-12 lead by the Wizards seemed as mysterious to Noah as it was to observers. The Bulls were out of sync, flat, listless.

Then they took the lead. Then they gave it all back.

Overtime came around because the Bulls once again let the Wizards own the end of the game.

Noah’s enthusiasm and mix-master frenzy is needed. But he can’t do it all. He’s a center, after all, not a one, two, three or four.

Noah had not wanted any publicity after his award presentation, deflecting all praise and thanking his teammates. He was trying desperately to stay focused on the task at hand. The award could sit somewhere and gather dust for all he cared.

After Game 1, when a couple of players were horrendous on defense and Noah’s usual double-double seemed irrelevant, coach Tom Thibodeau said he would not blame one player, that this was a team affair.

“To put it on one guy, that’s not how we do it here,” Thibodeau said. “I could go from start to finish.’’

Said Wizards coach Randy Wittman after Washington’s Game 2 victory: ‘‘I’m an old-school coach. I come from Bobby Knight. I believe you have to play defense.’’

Is that the problem? The Bulls don’t play defense?

Scoring in the clutch helps, too. But even that might not be enough now.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @ricktelander

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
2 Points
1

Bond denied for Flossmoor man charged with killing two teens

"An argument led to this, that's crazy," Means' mother, Camille Cochran, told the Chicago Sun-Times on Saturday. He's accused of killing 16-year-old Jordan Means and 18-year-old Anthony Bankhead on Saturday morning in Chicago, Chicago Police said. SUN-TIMES MEDIA WIRE April 22, 2014 5:46PM Justin Hamilton, 23, of Flossmoor, was charged with two counts of first-degree murder.

SUN-TIMES MEDIA WIRE April 22, 2014 5:46PM

Justin Hamilton, 23, of Flossmoor, was charged with two counts of first-degree murder. He’s accused of killing 16-year-old Jordan Means and 18-year-old Anthony Bankhead on Saturday morning in Chicago, Chicago Police said. | Chicago Police photo

Updated: April 22, 2014 7:20PM

A Flossmoor man was ordered held without bail Tuesday in the gang-related shooting deaths of two Chicago teens Saturday morning on the city’s South Side, according to Cook County prosecutors.

Justin Hamilton, 23, is charged with two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Jordan Means, 17, and Anthony Bankhead, 19, who were found dead in the basement of a building in the 8200 block of South Houston Avenue about 10:45 a.m. Saturday.

Both died of gunshot wounds to the head, according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office. It said Bankhead lived in the home where he was killed and Means lived less than two blocks away.

Prosecutors said Hamilton and the victims were members of the same street gang and got into an argument and physical fight on Friday over items being taken from one of the victims.

On Saturday, Hamilton and two other gang members went to Bankhead’s home to confront him and Means about the ongoing dispute, a verbal argument ensued and Hamilton shot the teens, prosecutors said.

They said witnesses saw Hamilton with a handgun immediately after the shots were fired, and he pointed the gun at them, telling them to not say anything about the shootings or they and their families would be in danger.

“An argument led to this, that’s crazy,” Means’ mother, Camille Cochran, told the Chicago Sun-Times on Saturday. “Now, I don’t have my son no more.”

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
5 Points
1

Blues’ Hitchcock: It’s Blackhawks’ will, not their skill

With the Blues leading 2-1 heading into Game 4 at the United Center on Wednesday night, Blues coach Ken Hitchcock has correctly boiled down this series to what it really is: a battle of wills. Game 4 is where the Hawks often start taking off. "We've got to find another gear from a resolve standpoint to go just a little bit further," Hitchcock said. The Blues are ready to show what they've learned from last season's opening-round loss to the defending champion Kings .

BY MARK POTASHStaff Reporter April 22, 2014 11:20PM

The best team has lost in the first three games of the Blackhawks-Blues series ? just one reason this is the most captivating playoff series in the NHL. Nobody knows what will happen next.

This first-round series has offered a range of drama worthy of a Stanley Cup Final ? comedy, tragedy, suspense, antagonism, last-second heroics and great, competitive hockey. The best team winning is about the only thing that hasn’t happened yet.

And it might never happen. With the Blues leading 2-1 heading into Game 4 at the United Center on Wednesday night, Blues coach Ken Hitchcock has correctly boiled down this series to what it really is: a battle of wills. The Blues’ biggest hurdle is that they’re up against a team that can will itself to victory. Their biggest advantage is that they appear to be learning that invaluable trait of a champion.

“[The Hawks are] not a defending champion because they have skill. It’s because they have resolve. You’re trying to beat resolve,” Hitchcock said after the Hawks’ 2-0 victory in Game 3. “You’re not trying to beat their skill. Everybody’s got skill. And it is one hell of a challenge.

“Sometimes you do it, and sometimes you don’t. But I can tell you one thing: Every time we play like we play, we get better as a team and better as an organization. And we get closer and closer.”

This is what the Hawks should fear most ? that they’re facing a well-coached, talented team that’s learning quickly how to raise its game to meet the challenge. The Blues should miss injured captain David Backes more than the Hawks miss suspended defenseman Brent Seabrook. But it was the Blues who dominated Game 3 when the Hawks had an opportunity to impose their will after Jonathan Toews’ fortuitous first-period goal that somehow got past Ryan Miller.

“They know we’re not going away easy,” Hitchcock said. “If we’re not good enough at the end, that’s fine. But we’re not going away in any game. This is the level we’re going to play at.

“We get Backes back in the next two or three games, we’re going to go even higher. And if that isn’t good enough, it isn’t good enough. But it has nothing to do with blowing games. There’s a certain resolve that is required to win a championship. And that team over there has got it, and we’re going to take it back from them.”

That only adds to the fascination of this series. The Blues are ready to show what they’ve learned from last season’s opening-round loss to the defending champion Kings ? when the Blues led the series 2-0 but lost four in a row, including a crushing 3-2 overtime loss in Game??5 at home.

“We’ve got to find another gear from a resolve standpoint to go just a little bit further,” Hitchcock said.

They appear capable of doing that. But they’re up against a championship team that practically defines that quality. Game 4 is where the Hawks often start taking off. In the previous four postseasons, they’re 15-15 in Games 1-3 of a series and 22-6 in Games 4-7.

This is where the Hawks’ will to win starts kicking in. Hitchcock’s team already has suffered the uncanniness of Toews. How many times does Miller stop the shot that Toews took in the first period in Game 3 ? 98, 99? With Toews, it not only gets through, but it holds up.

Uncanny, indeed. But it’s going to take more than that to win this series. It’s up to the Hawks to recognize what they’re up against and do what they do best.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @MarkPotash

Chicago Sun-Times
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