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Cardinal celebrates what may be ‘last Easter’ leading Chicago flock

"It might be the last Easter in which I'm the archbishop of Chicago. I don't know if it will be the last Easter in which I'm on the face of the earth," George, 77, said after the 11 a.m. Rather than wring hands over the unchangeable, he urged Catholics to refocus on "genuine self-sacrifice for others.""We remain in prisons of our own making," George said. George said that giving up "the bonds of self-interest" is the only way to become as "free" as the "fishing boats" owned by the original disciples.

BY BRIAN SLODYSKO Staff Reporter April 20, 2014 1:58PM

Updated: April 20, 2014 8:38PM

On what may have been his last Easter Sunday as the archbishop of Chicago, Cardinal Francis George alluded to his long struggle with cancer while reflecting on death, salvation and how all Catholics could benefit from learning to just let go.

“It might be the last Easter in which I’m the archbishop of Chicago. I don’t know if it will be the last Easter in which I’m on the face of the earth,” George, 77, said after the 11 a.m. Mass at Holy Name Cathedral, which drew lines around the block.

The cardinal, who is undergoing chemotherapy for this third bout with cancer, has said previously that the disease will eventually kill him. Recently, he urged the church to start searching for his replacement.

During the homily, George reflected on the sometimes unpleasant surprises in life ? “complicated diagnoses” included.

Rather than wring hands over the unchangeable, he urged Catholics to refocus on “genuine self-sacrifice for others.”

“We remain in prisons of our own making,” George said. “We are not in control of our lives and our world.”

Referring to Pope Francis ? who has made income inequality and service to the poor a cornerstone of his papacy ? George said that giving up “the bonds of self-interest” is the only way to become as “free” as the “fishing boats” owned by the original disciples.

After Mass, Catholics from far and wide reflected on the cardinal’s legacy.

“I may not have agreed with ever step, every action, every word. But he did the best that he could,” said Lorie Pedelty, of Chicago.

Mary Chen, 50, of Jefferson City, Mo., said Catholics could draw inspiration from George’s health struggles.

“In his illness and in his suffering he has an ability to inspire people. There’s a new role for him to play,” Chen said. “He shows that you live out faith over a lifetime.”

Asked about his health, George said that despite the chemotherapy treatments, he feels “good off and on these days.”

But, he added, his own challenges remain small compared with unrest in the Ukraine and Syria, and the continued effect a bad economy has on the poor across the U.S.

“Nothing is ever without hope, no matter what the situation is,” George said. “But you have to work that out in this life, day by day. It’s a moving experience to be reminded of that, especially on Easter Sunday.”

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @brianslodysko

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
17 Points
1

4 injured? including 1 child ? in South Side shooting

SUN-TIMES MEDIA WIRE April 20, 2014 8:34PM Updated: April 20, 2014 8:37PMFour people, including at least one child, were taken to hospitals Sunday night after a shooting in the Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood on the South Side.The four were transported to hospitals after suffering injuries in the shooting about 7:40 p.m.

SUN-TIMES MEDIA WIRE April 20, 2014 8:34PM

Updated: April 20, 2014 8:37PM

Four people, including at least one child, were taken to hospitals Sunday night after a shooting in the Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood on the South Side.

The four were transported to hospitals after suffering injuries in the shooting about 7:40 p.m. in the 6500 block of South Michigan Avenue, police said.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
14 Points
1

Pope Francis, huge crowd joyously celebrate Easter

turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter's Square from the balcony of the Bernini colonnade during Pope Francis' Easter Mass, at the the Vatican, Sunday, April 20, 2014. Even before Mass began, a crowd of more than 100,000 was overflowing from the cobblestoned square, and many more Romans, tourists and pilgrims were still streaming in for the pontiff's tradition Easter greeting at noon (1000 GMT).

By FRANCES D’EMILIO Associated Press April 20, 2014 10:28AM

A large crowd is seen in St. Peter's Square from the balcony of the Bernini colonnade during Pope Francis' Easter Mass, at the the Vatican, Sunday, April 20, 2014. Even before Mass began, a crowd of more than 100,000 was overflowing from the cobblestoned square, and many more Romans, tourists and pilgrims were still streaming in for the pontiff's tradition Easter greeting at noon (1000 GMT). (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Updated: April 20, 2014 10:28AM

VATICAN CITY ? Marking Christianity’s most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home.

Well over 150,000 tourists ? Romans and pilgrims, young and old ? turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter’s Basilica.

So great were their numbers that they overflowed from sprawling St. Peter’s Square, which was bedecked with row after row of potted daffodils, sprays of blue hyacinths and bunches of white roses. Waving flags from the pope’s native Argentina as well as from Brazil, Mexico, Britain, Poland and many other countries, they also filled the broad boulevard leading from the square to the Tiber River.

Easter is the culmination of Holy Week and marks Christian belief that Jesus rose from the dead after his crucifixion.

Francis noted that this year the Catholic church’s celebration of Easter coincided with that of Orthodox churches, which have many followers in Ukraine.

Francis prayed that God would “enlighten and inspire the initiatives that promote peace in Ukraine, so that all those involved, with the support of the international community, will make every effort to prevent violence.”

In eastern Ukraine, the holiday was marred by a deadly shooting Sunday fueled by tensions between pro-Russian supporters in the east and those loyal to an interim government in Kiev. The clash appeared to defy an international agreement reached last week in hopes of ending months of unrest.

Francis also prayed that all sides in Syria will be moved to “boldly negotiate the peace long awaited and long overdue.” Syria has been wracked by a three-year civil war that has cost 150,000 lives and forced millions to flee the country.

Christians make up about 5 percent of Syria’s population. In comments to mark Easter there, the Greek Orthodox patriarch vowed that Christians there “will not submit” to extremists who attack “our people and holy places.”

Francis makes a pilgrimage to Jordan, the Palestinian territories and Israel next month, so on Easter he prayed that hopes sparked by the resumption of Mideast peace negotiations will be sustained.

Thousands of pilgrims from around the world flocked to the celebrate Easter in the Holy Land, where Christian communities, as well as elsewhere in the Middle East, have been declining as the faithful flee regional turmoil.

Francis also spoke of those suffering in Africa from an epidemic of deadly Ebola and urged a halt to “brutal terrorist attacks” in parts of Nigeria.

Nigerians marked Easter with heightened security against a spreading Islamic uprising, mourning the deaths of 75 bomb blast victims and fearful of the fate of 85 abducted schoolgirls. The homegrown terror network Boko Haram has claimed responsibility for last week’s rush-hour explosion in the capital, Abuja, and threatened more attacks.

In Venezuela, there have been hopes Vatican mediation can help end the country’s violent political unrest, and Francis urged that “hearts be turned to reconciliation and fraternal concord” there.

But Francis’ Easter message also urged people to pay attention to the needy close to home. He said the “good news” of Easter’s joy means “leaving ourselves behind and encountering others, being close to those crushed by life’s troubles, sharing with the needy, standing at the side of the sick, elderly and the outcast.”

He denounced the ‘‘scourge of hunger,” which he said was ‘‘aggravated by conflicts and by the immense wastefulness for which we are often responsible.”

Francis has set an austere tone in his papacy, forsaking an ornate apostolic palace apartment for a simple guesthouse on the Vatican grounds and rejecting limousines for regular cars.

Cheering and applauding, the crowd tried to catch a glimpse of the pontiff as he circled around in his white popemobile before going to the basilica’s balcony to deliver his commentary.

Reflecting the worldwide reach of the Catholic church, faithful read aloud prayers and passages from the Bible in Hindi, French, Chinese, German, Korean, Spanish, Italian and English.

Writers Michelle Faul in Lagos, Nigeria; Ian Deitch in Jerusalem and Yuras Karmanau in Bybasivka, Ukraine, contributed to this story.

Chicago Sun-Times
20/04
13 Points
1

Bulls vs. Wizards: Game 1 updates, discussion

April 9, 2014 7:04PM Washington Wizards forward Nene Hilario (42) looks to pass the ball under pressure from Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game in Washington, Friday, Jan. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) Updated: April 20, 2014 5:11PM.

April 9, 2014 7:04PM

Washington Wizards forward Nene Hilario (42) looks to pass the ball under pressure from Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game in Washington, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Updated: April 20, 2014 5:11PM

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
3 Points
1

Newborn boy found dead in Northwest Side gangway

was found in a gangway in the 2700 block of North Hamlin Avenue, according to police and the Cook County medical examiner's office. SUN-TIMES MEDIA April 20, 2014 10:12AM Updated: April 20, 2014 8:29PMA baby boy was found dead, wrapped in a plastic bag in a Northwest Side gangway this weekend.

SUN-TIMES MEDIA April 20, 2014 10:12AM

Updated: April 20, 2014 8:29PM

A baby boy was found dead, wrapped in a plastic bag in a Northwest Side gangway this weekend. About 8:30 a.m., the boy ? described as a newborn ? was found in a gangway in the 2700 block of North Hamlin Avenue, according to police and the Cook County medical examiner’s office. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

A police source described the baby as a “full-term male infant” who was 1 day old.

On Sunday, authorities hadn’t located the baby’s family or otherwise identified him. And an autopsy performed Sunday was inconclusive. More studies are underway to determine how the newborn died, according to the medical examiner’s office.

Detectives would not comment on the investigation.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
3 Points
1

In pre-Easter march, Chicago religious, community activists call for peace

churches, the community, stakeholders, the businesses, everybody."Email: [email protected]: @KnowlesFran. and as murders and shootings mounted this weekend."Symbolically, we utilize the dying on the cross of Jesus and the resurrection of Christ as a symbol of what can happen in this south Chicago community," said Steve Jones, pastor of Praise Tabernacle Deliverance Center.

By FRANCINE KNOWLES Religion Reporter April 19, 2014 6:26PM

Updated: April 20, 2014 6:12PM

In the spirit of Easter, a diverse group of religious and community activists had the goal of helping resurrect peace and their communities as they held an anti-violence march and outdoor ecumenical service Saturday on the South Side.

The event came on the heels of nearly three dozen shootings around the city last weekend ? so far the bloodiest weekend of the year ? and as murders and shootings mounted this weekend.

“Symbolically, we utilize the dying on the cross of Jesus and the resurrection of Christ as a symbol of what can happen in this south Chicago community,” said Steve Jones, pastor of Praise Tabernacle Deliverance Center. “We can be resurrected.

“This community has been economically severed ?.and along with that come all the symptoms ? violence and gang warfare. We utilize this time to bring the community together to say we can come together to save the community.”

Our Lady of Guadalupe and New Prospect Missionary Baptist Church were among the churches and organizations that participated in the 15th annual event, presented by Claretian Associates in partnership with CeaseFire Illinois and others. The event took place amid worries violence will climb as temperatures rise.

It was about more than marching, said the Rev. Corwin Lasenby, pastor of Pilgrim Missionary Baptist Church. The gathering also was held to let the community know about resources available to help them, he said.

“All of our churches are trying to do something to offset a violent summer,” Lasenby said.

The first Friday of very month, from May through August, he said his church will host “a night of music and food, to give another alternative to a negative summer. We don’t know what the summer will be, but we are really trying to do our very best to ensure that our community is safe.”

Jones’ church has launched a teen development and mentorship program called Save a Youth.

“We give them a forum to be able to express and talk about the issues that they deal with, to initiate some understanding of how to deal with conflict resolution from a biblical perspective and an interpersonal perspective as well as take them on trips to expand their horizon of their possibilities,” he said.

Amid chants of “Don’t shoot. Let the kids grow up,” the group marched several blocks, from 91st and Commercial to South Chicago Peoples’ Park for the outdoor service.

“I want to stop the violence,” 10-year-old Gisel Munoz said when asked why she came out Saturday.

Hearts were heavy for some in attendance who a year earlier had listened to an impassioned speech by then-CeaseFire volunteer Bearling Robinson Jr. A few months later, he was killed when he tried to mediate a dispute. His wife spoke tearfully of him during a memorial presentation Saturday and later said her husband’s efforts to help his community made him a role model.

“We need to show some love to one another instead of all this hatred,” said Bearling Robinson Sr., the slain man’s father. “We’ve got to look after each other like a family. And once we do that, we should be all right.”

Ulysses Floyd, an outreach worker supervisor with CeaseFire, said two of his sons were victims of gun violence. He said the message he hoped to send Saturday was, “Violence is just not a CeaseFire problem or Chicago police problem, it’s a community problem. Everybody needs to be involved, to come together to help stop this violence ? churches, the community, stakeholders, the businesses, everybody.”

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @KnowlesFran

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
3 Points
1

Lori’s list: Pop stars come to Pawnee on ‘Parks and Recreation’

Thursday, WLS-Channel 7): Like "Homeland," this drama revolves around a brilliant bipolar female . Black can once again go off her meds and turn into a sex fiend in a show that might as well be called "Fifty Shades of Grey Matter." Rating: . These unusual medical cases feel like a way of marking time until Dr. Black's mental illness supposedly makes her uniquely qualified to treat patients with extraordinary neurological conditions.

By LORI RACKL TV Critic April 20, 2014 7:40PM

Kelly Reilly on "Black Box." | ABC

Updated: April 20, 2014 8:03PM

“LATE SHOW WITH DAVID LETTERMAN” (10:35 p.m. Tuesday, WBBM-Channel 2): The future meets the past when Stephen Colbert and David Letterman make their first joint appearance since the announcement that the Comedy Central star will take over for the veteran late-night host when Letterman hangs it up next year. You can bet Rush Limbaugh will be hate-watching.

“PARKS AND RECREATION” (7 p.m. Thursday, WMAQ-Channel 5): With a musical lineup better than this year’s Lollapalooza, this hourlong installment of one of television’s best comedies ends season six on a high note when the Pawnee parks department puts on its Unity concert with the help of Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, the Decemberists, Yo La Tengo, Letters to Cleo and Ginuwine. First Lady Michelle Obama also makes a cameo, but I’m most excited to see unflappable Ron Swanson (Nick Offerman) have another run-in with his ex-wife, Tammy 2 (Offerman’s real spouse, Megan Mullalley). And we’ll find out if Leslie (Amy Poehler) will be our neighbor and take that job in Chicago.

“BAD TEACHER” (8:30 p.m. Thursday, WBBM Channel-2): This TV adaptation of the 2011 Cameron Diaz film by the same name stars an adequately amusing Ari Graynor (“Fringe”) as a self-absorbed former trophy wife who’s set her gold-digging sights on single dads at the middle school where she conned her way into a teaching gig. It’s decent material to mine for laughs in a two-hour movie, but it wears thin on a weekly basis despite solid performances by the rest of the cast, including Sara Gilbert (“The Talk”) as a lovable loser, David Alan Grier (“In Living Color”) as a divorced principal and Kristin Davis playing a schoolmarm version of Charlotte on “Sex and the City.” Rating: ??

“BLACK BOX” (9 p.m. Thursday, WLS-Channel 7): Like “Homeland,” this drama revolves around a brilliant bipolar female ? who really likes jazz. Unlike “Homeland,” this drama is not good. Dr. Catherine Black (Kelly Reilly, “Sherlock Holmes”) is a gifted neuroscientist struggling to keep her manic-depression under wraps at work, where her colleagues include a womanizing surgeon (Ditch Davey, “Spartacus”) straight out of a telenovela. Dr. Black’s mental illness supposedly makes her uniquely qualified to treat patients with extraordinary neurological conditions. These unusual medical cases feel like a way of marking time until Dr. Black can once again go off her meds and turn into a sex fiend in a show that might as well be called “Fifty Shades of Grey Matter.” Rating: ?

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @lorirackl

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
1 Points
1

School drama educates about how teachers are tested

Banerjee and McKenzie Chinn as Shelley in "Principal Principle" by Joe Zarrow. But there is something about seeing how this all plays out in the lives of the four quite different teachers and one administrator in Joe Zarrow's "Principal Principle" that nails the issues with an ideal mix of stinging satire and abiding sadness. Providing blackly comic "interludes" are the announcements over the public address system (deftly voiced by TaRon Patton) .

By HEDY WEISS Theater Critic April 20, 2014 3:10PM

Elana Elyce as Ola, Barbara Roeder Harris as Denise, Cassy Sanders as Kay, Arya Daire as Ms. Banerjee and McKenzie Chinn as Shelley in "Principal Principle" by Joe Zarrow. | EMILY SCHWARTZ

‘PRINCIPAL PRINCIPLE’

Highly Recommended

When: Through May 18

Where: Stage Left Theatre and Theater Seven Chicago at Theater Wit, 1229 W. Belmont

Tickets: $18-$27

Info: (773) 975-8150; www.theaterwit.org

Run time: 2 hours and 10 minutes with one intermission

Updated: April 20, 2014 8:06PM

The philosophical chaos and social dissension that now permeates every aspect of the Chicago Public School system is all too familiar. But there is something about seeing how this all plays out in the lives of the four quite different teachers and one administrator in Joe Zarrow’s “Principal Principle” that nails the issues with an ideal mix of stinging satire and abiding sadness.

Zarrow’s drama, now in its world premiere in a co-production of Stage Left Theatre and Theatre Seven Chicago, chronicles one year in the life of these five women, all of whom work in the fictional Chinua Achebe Academy High School (named after the Nigerian novelist). Located in a “middle-of-the-road” neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side, the school’s student body is 95 percent African-American.

The teachers are all part of the English faculty and include: Denise Corey (Barbara Roeder Harris), the white, “old school” veteran who has seen it all and is just a year from retirement; Ola Lawrence (Elana Elyce), the serious-minded, non-confrontational department chair, who is black; Shelley Woods (McKenzie Chinn), the smart, creative but racially obsessed teacher with a latter-day Angela Davis mindset, and Kay Josephs (Cassy Sanders), the hardworking “newbie” (white, and from Naperville), who left the business world, spent an intensive summer in the Inner-City Teaching Corps, and is determined to succeed.

The bane of the teachers’ existence is Ms. Banerjee (Arya Daire), the chic, highly paid principal ? a corporate-minded woman who spouts all the trendy jargon as she presents each of them with the Cornell Review, a massive looseleaf binder with the latest prescribed guidelines from “downtown.” It supposedly holds the miracle cure that will improve test scores.

Each of the four teachers has her own set of personal and pedagogical “principles” and techniques for dealing with a situation that requires far more than “teaching to the test.” And Zarrow, who spent seven years in the classroom, including four with the CPS, clearly knows the full roster of challenges, from the mundane (malfunctioning copy machines and a lack of materials that results in some buying office supplies with their own money), to the desperate, to the demoralizing (students’ chronic absenteeism and the whole array of family and community problems, as well as teacher evaluations based largely on test scores that are not necessarily an indication of true learning).

Under Scott Bishop’s crisp, fast-moving direction (on Joe Schermoly’s picture-perfect set complete with old metal desks), the ideally cast actors give vivid portrayals. Providing blackly comic “interludes” are the announcements over the public address system (deftly voiced by TaRon Patton) ? a litany of policies, procedures and orders that suggest a detention center more than a center of learning.

The saddest thing here is that these teachers are filled with the best intentions, and want to engage, challenge and prepare their kids for the real world. The real world, however, is a mess.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @HedyWeissCritic

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
1 Points
1

Cubs lose another series after falling to the Reds

The next batter, Zak Cozart, hit an RBI double of his own that scored Mesoraco. Two outs and four batters later, Cozart hit a two-run homer that scored Mesoraco.Down 8-0 to head into the bottom of the seventh inning, a Cubs rally didn't do much but extend the length of the game.The Cubs first scored after Ryan Sweeney hit an RBI single in the seventh inning that scored Emilio Bonifacio who doubled to lead off the inning.

BY SETH GRUEN Staff Reporter April 20, 2014 5:29PM

CHICAGO, IL - APRIL 20: Brandon Phillips #4 of the Cincinnati Reds forces out Mike Olt #30 of the Chicago Cubs during the seventh inning on April 20, 2014 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by David Banks/Getty Images)

Getting third outs proved very elusive for the Cubs Sunday when they played the Reds at Wrigley Field.

Cincinnati scored all but one of its runs with two outs in an 8-2 drubbing of the Cubs. With the win, the Reds won the three-game series. The Cubs haven’t won a series all year.

The Reds broke a scoreless tie with a two-out rally in the fourth inning.

Cincinnati catcher Devin Mesoraco started if off when he hit an RBI double that scored third baseman Todd Frazier. The next batter, Zak Cozart, hit an RBI double of his own that scored Mesoraco. Pitcher Homer Bailey helped his own cause by hitting a single and driving in Cozart, capping a three-run inning for the Reds.

The Reds repeated a similar scenario in the fifth inning. With two outs, Jay Bruce doubled off the right-center field wall and scored on a Frazier two-base knock. Ryan Ludwick’s single drove Frazier to cap a two-run inning.

The Cubs were looking to get starter Carlos Villanueva through the top of the fifth inning because his spot was due up to lead off the bottom of the inning. But after the Ludwick single, the maligned righty was yanked in a double switch.

Villanueva gave up nine hits, five earned runs and struck out seven. He entered the game with an 11.57 ERA.

Bruce homered to lead off the seventh inning ? the only run Cincinnati scored when they didn’t have two outs. Two outs and four batters later, Cozart hit a two-run homer that scored Mesoraco.

Down 8-0 to head into the bottom of the seventh inning, a Cubs rally didn’t do much but extend the length of the game.

The Cubs first scored after Ryan Sweeney hit an RBI single in the seventh inning that scored Emilio Bonifacio who doubled to lead off the inning. Sweeney then scored on a Nate Schierholtz line drive single that deflected off the glove of Reds second baseman Brandon Phillips.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @SethGruen

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
1 Points
1

White Sox snap 4-game losing streak with 16-2 pounding

The Sox piled on against Hector Noesi for seven runs in the ninth inning.Erik Johnson had an oddly effective outing, allowing one single but walking five while pitching only five innings to earn his first win. Johnson threw 87 pitches, 44 for strikes, and walked the leadoff man his first four innings.Andre Reinzo, who was thought to be a candidate to fill the injured Felipe Paulino's spot in the starting rotation, pitched the eighth inning.

BY DARYL VAN SCHOUWEN Staff Reporter April 20, 2014 5:32PM

Updated: April 20, 2014 6:33PM

Jose Abreu and Jordan Danks each hit two-run homers, Dayan Viciedo hit his first home run of the season and Marcus Semien had four hits including a three-run triple as the visiting White Sox clobbered the Texas Rangers 16-2 Sunday to halt a four-game losing streak.

Salvaging the last game of a three-game series, the Sox cranked out 18 hits, including a career-high four by Semien (four RBI) and three each by Abreu (two doubles), Viciedo and Tyler Flowers (.389). The Sox piled on against Hector Noesi for seven runs in the ninth inning.

Erik Johnson had an oddly effective outing, allowing one single but walking five while pitching only five innings to earn his first win. Johnson threw 87 pitches, 44 for strikes, and walked the leadoff man his first four innings.

Andre Reinzo, who was thought to be a candidate to fill the injured Felipe Paulino’s spot in the starting rotation, pitched the eighth inning. He loaded the bases with a walk, hit batsman and infield single but retired Alex Rios on a pop-up to Abreu to end the inning without any damage.

Semien, who has batted second all year, moved up to the leadoff spot with Adam Eaton sidelined by a mild strained left hamstring.

Ronald Belisario pitched two hitless innings.

The Sox (9-10) open a four-game series against the Tigers on Monday in Detroit.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
1 Points
1

Six shot at Easter party in suburban Montgomery

SUN-TIMES MEDIA April 20, 2014 12:09PM Updated: April 20, 2014 12:12PMSix people were shot at an Easter party early Sunday in west suburban Montgomery.About 12:40 a.m., a gunman got out of an SUV and began shooting into a garage where the party was taking place, Montgomery Police Chief Dan Meyers said in an emailed statement.

SUN-TIMES MEDIA April 20, 2014 12:09PM

Updated: April 20, 2014 12:12PM

Six people were shot at an Easter party early Sunday in west suburban Montgomery.

About 12:40 a.m., a gunman got out of an SUV and began shooting into a garage where the party was taking place, Montgomery Police Chief Dan Meyers said in an emailed statement.

Four men and two women were shot and taken to an area hospital, according to Meyers. Children were at the party, but none were hit by the gunfire.

Later Sunday, no suspects were in custody as the Kane County Major Crimes Task Force unit and Montgomery Police Department continued investigating.

Police are looking for one ? possibly two ? guns that were used in the shooting. Authorities also are looking for a gold SUV with gold rims that the gunman was riding in.

Chicago Sun-Times
20/04
8 Points
1

Husband, wife ? both officers ? dead in murder-suicide: police

| Eric Clark/ For Sun-Times Media Updated: April 20, 2014 12:36PM A Chicago Police Officer and her husband, a Cook County Sheriff's correctional officer, were found dead in their Southwest Side home Sunday in what appears to be a murder-suicide, authorities said.The correctional officer apparently shot his wife before shooting himself, said Cook County Sheriff's spokeswoman Cara Smith."This is a tremendous tragedy any day ? particularly on Easter Sunday," Smith said.

BY GEORGE SLEFO AND JON SEIDEL Staff Reporters April 20, 2014 10:02AM

Chicago Police investigate an apparent murder-suicide involving a Chicago Police Officer and her husband, a Cook County Sheriff's correctional officer, at their home in the 5300 block of South Austin Avenue. | Eric Clark/ For Sun-Times Media

Updated: April 20, 2014 12:36PM

A Chicago Police Officer and her husband, a Cook County Sheriff’s correctional officer, were found dead in their Southwest Side home Sunday in what appears to be a murder-suicide, authorities said.

The correctional officer apparently shot his wife before shooting himself, said Cook County Sheriff’s spokeswoman Cara Smith.

“This is a tremendous tragedy any day ? particularly on Easter Sunday,” Smith said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the families.”

The couple has been identified as Javier and Veronica Acevedo, both 50, authorities said.

Just after 5 a.m. someone inside the Garfield Ridge home, located in the 5300 block of South Austin Avenue, called 911, Smith said.

Chicago police found them unresponsive inside the home a short time later.

The Cook County medical examiner’s office confirmed the fatalities but would not immediately release additional information. Area Central detectives are conducting a homicide investigation.

Veronica Acevedo served 18 years with the Chicago Police Department and had won 23 “department awards” during her career, said Chicago Police Officer Jose Estrada, a department spokesman. Her husband served 25 years as a Cook County Sheriff’s correctional officer, and had been working in Division 8 of the county jail, according to Smith, the sheriff’s spokeswoman.

The Rev. Edward Cronin of the nearby St. Jane DeChantal Church said he got to know the couple over the last couple of years as they attended his church.

He said he gave them prayer counseling to help them face “the violence of the world” as police officers.

“It’s evil,” he said. “The violence is evil. And they need protection against the evil that they’re up against every day. And then here’s a horrible evil act that happens within their home. He must have just, you know, really really been even more stressed than anyone ever realized.”

Cronin said he spoke to the couple’s teenage daughter, who is “terribly distraught.”

As the morning went on, people could be seen taking items out of the couple’s home and into a red car parked outside the home. They collected a cat, pet supplies and a backpack and drove away.

Hymns could be heard outside the open door of a nearby church where families of worshippers walked to Easter service while investigators tended to the couple’s home not even a block away.

Police tape and TV news trucks spoiled an otherwise beautiful Easter Sunday morning in a neighborhood where purple ribbons had been tied around the trees and bunnies adorned the homes.

Chicago Sun-Times
20/04
9 Points
1

After costly OT loss, Seabrook will have hearing Sunday

Louis Blues took a 2-0 series lead with Saturday's 4-3 overtime victory over the Hawks. The goal ended a scoring drought of more than 118 minutes, and seemed to snap the Hawks back to life. "We're a resilient group," said Seabrook, who very well might not play another game this season if the Hawks don't rally to win the series. For the second straight game, the Blues scored a last-gasp equalizer . They made it 13 minutes and 6 seconds before Tarasenko ripped a shot that beat Crawford at the near post.

BY MARK LAZERUS Staff Reporter April 19, 2014 5:24PM

Updated: April 20, 2014 11:02AM

ST. LOUIS ? The post-whistle skirmishes grew larger and more vicious. The hits were harder and more dangerous. The conversations between captains Jonathan Toews and David Backes and referee Brad Meier grew longer and more animated.

Gradually, the game was unraveling. Suddenly, the Blackhawks’ season might be, too.

The St. Louis Blues took a 2-0 series lead with Saturday’s 4-3 overtime victory over the Hawks. For the second straight game, the Blues scored a last-gasp equalizer ? this time, Vladimir Tarasenko’s power-play goal with 6.4 seconds left in regulation. For the second straight game, the Blues won it in overtime ? this time, Barret Jackman’s shot squeezing through Corey Crawford’s pads at 5:50 of the extra session. And for the second straight game, the Hawks found themselves straining to focus on the positives, and keep their ever-defiant, ever-confident mindset.

In the wake of another gut-punch in St. Louis, Duncan Keith was asked if it was a heartbreaker.

“My heart’s still kicking,” Keith said. “It’s not broken, that’s for sure.”

Heartbroken? No. Frustrated? Disappointed? Maybe a little bit angry? No question.

How about concerned?

The Hawks now need to win four of the next five games to advance to the second round. They need to do it with a disjointed power play that has come up empty nine straight times, with just seven shots on goal. They need to do it against a physical team that appears to be in their heads a bit, goading them into uncharacteristic post-whistle skirmishes and foolish penalties.

And they likely need to do it without Brent Seabrook, who’s staring down a suspension after he left Backes dazed and weak-kneed with a devastating head shot late in the third period.

“It’s hard to think about what could have been these last two games,” Toews said. “But what are you going to do? We’ve got a great opportunity to go home and turn this thing around in our own building, and take that momentum and find a way to not let it go.”

Hanging on to things ? like leads, and composure ? has been a problem through two games for the Hawks. Seabrook’s hit and the fallout from it ? Backes was “not good” after the game, according to Blues coach Ken Hitchcock, and certainly could miss extended time ? dominated the postgame, and obviously the five-minute charging major Seabrook was assessed contributed to the tying goal. But the big picture is that the Hawks had both games in their grasp, and let them both slip away.

“It’s frustrating right now,” Keith said. “We had the game. It’s two games now where we just need to find a way, but it’s not there.”

That the Hawks even had the lead was remarkable, given how poorly they started.

The Hawks power play was a disaster, slowly paced and sloppy, simply rimming the puck around the end boards to a lone forward who routinely got outworked for the puck by one or two Blues defenders. On one, Keith and Patrick Sharp ran into each other on the blue line, leading to a Steve Ott breakaway (which Crawford stopped). It was one of three times in the first two periods that two Hawks collided.

Meanwhile, the Blues took a 2-0 lead through one on goals by Chris Porter and Kevin Shattenkirk, the latter coming with two seconds left in the first period.

The second period started even worse for the Hawks, who didn’t put a shot on net for the first nine minutes. Meanwhile, they were coming unglued ? taking three straight penalties (their penalty kill and Crawford were the only reasons they were still in the game) and getting drawn into post-whistle extra-curriculars at nearly every stoppage. At one point, Crawford shoved Ryan Reaves, which led to Kris Versteeg taking out Derek Roy and earning a roughing minor. That’s what the Blues can do.

But thanks to the PK and two Blues shots that drew iron, the Hawks were still within striking distance when Keith beat Ryan Miller from the point through an Andrew Shaw screen with 2:35 left in the second period. The goal ended a scoring drought of more than 118 minutes, and seemed to snap the Hawks back to life. Seabrook scored at 4:53 of the third to tie it. Then, less than two minutes later, Michal Rozsival’s knuckler from the point hit Backes and beat Miller for a 3-2 lead.

The Hawks needed to protect (or extend) that lead for 13 minutes and 22 seconds. They made it 13 minutes and 6 seconds before Tarasenko ripped a shot that beat Crawford at the near post.

The Hawks had killed 4:45 of the major penalty ? with Miller pulled for an extra attacker the final 100 seconds ? when Tarasenko scored.

“Brutal,” said Hawks coach Joel Quenneville. “Did a great job killing ? outstanding job. And you’re right there, six seconds away. The other game was tough, it was tough losing with a buck and change [left]. But tonight was brutal.”

The Hawks have been down before. Just last year, they overcame a 3-1 deficit to beat the Red Wings in the second round en route to the Stanley Cup. The situation right now isn’t quite as dire ? but it’s getting close. Game 3 is Monday night at the United Center. And it’s now a must-win.

“We’re a resilient group,” said Seabrook, who very well might not play another game this season if the Hawks don’t rally to win the series. “It’s been a close series, and I think anything can happen. It’s still up for grabs.”

Chicago Sun-Times
20/04
7 Points
1

Newborn found dead in Northwest Side gangway

SUN-TIMES MEDIA April 20, 2014 10:12AM A baby boy was found dead, wrapped in a plastic bag in a Northwest Side gangway Saturday morning, authorities said.About 8:30 a.m., the boy . was found in a gangway in the 2700 block of North Hamlin Avenue, according to Chicago Police and the Cook County medical examiner's office.

SUN-TIMES MEDIA April 20, 2014 10:12AM

A baby boy was found dead, wrapped in a plastic bag in a Northwest Side gangway Saturday morning, authorities said.

About 8:30 a.m., the boy ? described as a newborn ? was found in a gangway in the 2700 block of North Hamlin Avenue, according to Chicago Police and the Cook County medical examiner’s office. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

The baby’s identity was not known Saturday night.

Area North detectives are conducting a death investigation.

Chicago Sun-Times
20/04
7 Points
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