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NU prof realizing genius grant is no prank

| AP Photo/Courtesy of MacArthur Foundation Updated: September 17, 2014 12:04PMWhen he learned two weeks ago that he’d won a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, Northwestern University Prof. Mark Hersam thought someone was playing a prank.Now, as the news is settling in . a billionth of a meter.“It’s approaching the atomic scale,” Hersam said.Hersam founded a Montreal-based startup company, NanoIntegris, which sells carbon nanotubes .

BY STEFANO ESPOSITO Staff Reporter September 17, 2014 11:56AM

Materials scientist Mark Hersam, shown in a lab at Northwestern University, was one of 21 people to receive a "genius grant" from the Chicago-based MacArthur Foundation. | AP Photo/Courtesy of MacArthur Foundation

Updated: September 17, 2014 12:04PM

When he learned two weeks ago that he’d won a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, Northwestern University Prof. Mark Hersam thought someone was playing a prank.

Now, as the news is settling in ? with the awards being made public this week ? Hersam is savoring the possibilities of having $625,000 in cash with no strings attached.

“I find that freedom is usually the path to the most creative and novel discoveries,” said the 39-year-old materials scientist. “The fact that it’s no strings attached and unrestricted is extremely rare.”

Hersam joins 20 other scholars and innovators in the 2014 class of MacArthur fellows.

“Those who think creativity is dying should examine the life’s work of these extraordinary innovators who work in diverse fields and in different ways to improve our lives and better our world,” said Cecilia Conrad, Vice President, MacArthur Fellows Program, in a prepared statement. “Together, they expand our view of what is possible, and they inspire us to apply our own talents and imagination.”

Fellows are selected “through a rigorous process that has involved thousands of expert and anonymous nominators,” according to the foundation’s website. The foundation doesn’t accept “unsolicited or outside nominations.”

The 2014 class also includes two other Illinois winners: Tara Zahra, a University of Chicago history professor and Tami Bond, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign environmental engineer.

Hersam’s work deals with materials so small they’re measured in nanometers ? a billionth of a meter.

“It’s approaching the atomic scale,” Hersam said.

Hersam founded a Montreal-based startup company, NanoIntegris, which sells carbon nanotubes ? microscopic material used in all kinds of electronic devices, from tablets to smart phones.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @slesposito

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
13 Points
New
1

Highland Park woman sentenced to five years for running over, killing 5-year-old girl

Her car keys were taken by a witness at the scene after the vehicle came to a stop.Rousso has been free on a $500,000 bail posted by her parents. Absolutely horrible,” said David Rousso, adding that classmates called her “Frankenstein” because of the stitches and surgeries after the attack.David Rousso said he and his wife knew she was depressed and began to self-medicate with drugs.

SUN-TIMES MEDIA September 17, 2014 9:52AM

Carly Rousso (center) and her mother (right) walk out of court after she was convicted in May. She is scheduled to be sentenced Wednesday. | Michael Schmidt/Sun-Times

Updated: September 17, 2014 5:05PM

In a packed Lake County courtroom Wednesday, Carly Rousso was sentenced to five years in prison for running over and killing a 5-year-old Highland Park girl while high on inhalants.

The sentence was handed down by Judge James Booras after a day-long sentencing hearing that included emotional victim impact statements from Jaclyn Santos-Sacramento’s family, a plea for lenience from Rousso’s father, and testimony from a drug counselor.

Rousso, 20, also of Highland Park, was convicted of aggravated DUI and pleaded guilty to reckless homicide at her trial earlier this year.

She had faced a maximum of 14 years in prison for the Labor Day 2012 death of Santos-Sacramento.

Rousso confessed to being high on inhalants when she ran over a family of four with her father’s Lexus, killing the 5-year-old girl on Central Avenue in downtown Highland Park.

Santos-Sacramento was walking on the sidewalk with her mother and two siblings. Her mother and two brothers were also struck by the vehicle.

Victim impact statements from Santos-Sacramento’s parents were read in court, and Rousso’s father tearfully testified about his daughter’s troubled youth.

Assistant State’s Attorney Stella Veytsel read the impact statements from Jaclyn’s father, Tomas Santos, and mother, Modesta Sacramento.

“Sept. 3, 2013 was the most painful day in my life as a father because I lost one of my children, my daughter. My fatherhood was destroyed when my daughter was taken away,” he said. “I’m asking for justice in the name of my daughter, Jaclyn Santos-Sacremento.”

Modesto Sacramento wrote that Rousso “ran over an entire family; me and my three children.”

She said Jaclyn was buried in Mexico.

“She was a loving little girl, very caring toward her brothers,” she said. “She looked forward to attending the same school as her brother, but only was able to attend for a few days before she was taken away from us.

“I do not think I can forgive her,” Sacramento said of Rousso.

During the sentencing hearing, Heather Keith, a certified alcohol and drug counselor, testified that as a child, Carly Rousso was raped. She was also attacked by a dog, resulting in 400 stitches in her face, and was bullied in school. Prior to the crime, she was diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder and major depression.

Keith said she believes Rousso has made great progress in the last two years, adding that she now volunteers as a treatment session leader. “Patients have said ‘she saved my life,’” Keith said.

On cross examination by the prosecution, Keith confirmed that while out on bond, Rousso was found to have abused inhalants and was hospitalized.

Rousso’s father, who cried at times as he testified under questioning by defense attorney Jed Stone, said his daughter had endured major trauma throughout her youth, including being raped in a mall while in junior high school and then taunted about it by fellow students. Then, at 14, she was attacked by a pit bull.

“It was horrible. Absolutely horrible,” said David Rousso, adding that classmates called her “Frankenstein” because of the stitches and surgeries after the attack.

David Rousso said he and his wife knew she was depressed and began to self-medicate with drugs. They enrolled her in a residential treatment camp in Utah at the end of her high school years.

When Stone asked him to describe his daughter, David Rousso said she is “a loving creature, a lovable person and she gives a great amount of love.

“She is a wonderful human being who made a terrible mistake,” he said.

On Sept. 3, 2012, Rousso told her mom that she was going to get a bite to eat. Instead, she drove her father’s car to a Walgreens and bought two cans of computer air duster, she told police during a videotaped confession.

She told police that after huffing the contents of a can of computer cleaner, and while cruising through Highland Park, she “must have passed out.”

Surveillance video showed that Rousso’s car crossed into oncoming lanes of traffic and barreled over a curb before striking the family as they walked on a sidewalk. Her car keys were taken by a witness at the scene after the vehicle came to a stop.

Rousso has been free on a $500,000 bail posted by her parents.

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
16 Points
New
1

Highland Park teen to be sentenced for running over, killing 5-year-old girl

| Michael Schmidt/Sun-Times A Highland Park teen who confessed to being high on inhalants when she ran over a family of four with her father’s Lexus, killing a young girl, is scheduled to be sentenced Wednesday.Carly Rousso had been found guilty of aggravated DUI by a Lake County judge in May. To the defendant it’s a drug,” said Booras before finding Rousso guilty of running over 5-year-old Jaclyn Santos-Sacramento, her mother, and two brothers.At the time, both families had declined to comment.

SUN-TIMES September 17, 2014 9:52AM

Carly Rousso (center) and her mother (right) walk out of court after she was convicted in May. She is scheduled to be sentenced Wednesday. | Michael Schmidt/Sun-Times

A Highland Park teen who confessed to being high on inhalants when she ran over a family of four with her father’s Lexus, killing a young girl, is scheduled to be sentenced Wednesday.

Carly Rousso had been found guilty of aggravated DUI by a Lake County judge in May.

Rousso has been free on $500,000 bail posted by her parents while awaiting sentencing.

She faces up to 14 years in prison.

It had taken Judge James Booras less than 30 minutes to find the 19-year-old Rousso guilty on all four counts of the charge.

“To most people [air duster] is a cleaning agent. To the defendant it’s a drug,” said Booras before finding Rousso guilty of running over 5-year-old Jaclyn Santos-Sacramento, her mother, and two brothers.

At the time, both families had declined to comment. But Lake County State’s Attorney Michael Nerheim speaking to reporters after the judge issued the verdict, said Jaclyn’s family are still grieving.

On the day of the Sept. 3, 2012, crash, Rousso told her mom that she was going to get a bite to eat. Instead, she drove her father’s car to a Walgreens and bought two cans of computer air duster, she told police during a videotaped confession.

“Huffing” the contents of a can while cruising through Highland Park she told police, she “must have passed out.”

Witness testimony, backed up by surveillance video, showed that Rousso’s car crossed oncoming lanes of traffic and barreled over a curb before striking the family as they walked on a sidewalk.

Adam Poncher testified that Rousso was not fully conscious as he pounded on the car window.

When Rousso finally appeared to regain consciousness, she asked in a slurry drawl: “What happened?” Adam Poncher said.

At one point, when asked by police if she was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, Rousso replied: “Not any more,” officials said.

During closing arguments her attorney, Douglas Zeit, did not deny she was responsible for a “horrific” crash.

“She struck and killed an innocent 5-year-old girl,” Zeit said. “This crime was reckless.”

But Zeit, who didn’t call any witnesses, repeatedly argued state law is vague when it comes to inhalants, including a chemical in the air duster.

Chicago Sun-Times
17/09
15 Points
1

Salami-smuggling mob enforcer gets 15 years for gun rap

”Leinenweber said he sympathized with Rainone’s health problems and that Rainone’s background meant he “probably felt he needed” a gun. BY KIM JANSSEN Federal Courts Reporter September 17, 2014 11:18AM Wa17rainone.jpg Updated: September 17, 2014 5:23PMMob enforcer Mario Rainone once bribed a jail guard to smuggle salami and pasta into his cell .

BY KIM JANSSEN Federal Courts Reporter September 17, 2014 11:18AM

Wa17rainone.jpg

Updated: September 17, 2014 5:23PM

Mob enforcer Mario Rainone once bribed a jail guard to smuggle salami and pasta into his cell ? just like the wiseguys in “Goodfellas.”

If he ever wants to enjoy the garlicky smack of fine Italian dining again, it’s a trick he’ll probably have to repeat.

A federal judge on Wednesday sentenced him to 15 years in prison. It may prove to be a life sentence for the once feared 60-year-old Outfit muscle, who suffers from temporary bouts of blindness and is believed to have prostate cancer.

“Normally, you’d think a 60-year-old person would be thinking about other things than committing crimes,” U.S. District Judge Harry Leinenweber told the balding, gray-haired Rainone.

The 15-year term Leinenweber imposed was the legal minimum Rainone could have received after he was convicted last year of keeping a stolen .357 Smith and Wesson handgun on his nightstand in Addison.

Though the conviction was humdrum, Rainone’s long and colorful criminal career, during which he’s served hard time for extortion, burglary and that sausage smuggling escapade, and been described as an “urban terrorist” by a judge, counted heavily against him.

Prosecutors detailed Wednesday how Rainone had used violence and threats to put the squeeze on Outfit debtors for decades, even threatening to chop off the heads of a restaurateur and his children, then place them on a spike if he wasn’t paid $200,000.

On another occasion, fearing his Outfit pals were about to kill him, he entered the federal witness protection program, only to think better of cooperating when his mother’s porch was bombed.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Amar Bhachu argued that Rainone’s violent recidivism and prison contraband bust should be held against him, arguing for a sentence of up to 24 years.

But Rainone’s attorney, Joe “The Shark” Lopez, said the smuggled goods were only “salami and some other Italian food products,” not drugs or weapons, adding “these incidents involved Mr. Rainone’s hunger for food!”

Leinenweber said he sympathized with Rainone’s health problems and that Rainone’s background meant he “probably felt he needed” a gun. But the judge also noted that he’d previously sentenced Outfit connected robbers who were in their 70s.

Rainone showed little emotion as the sentence was announced but flashed a smile and gave Lopez an old-fashioned Italian kiss on the cheek before he was led back to his cell.

Speaking outside court, Lopez said he was happy that the judge had given Rainone the lowest sentence possible, adding that Rainone “is not a beefer.”

A woman who Lopez identified as Rainone’s sister then exclaimed that the case “wasn’t about the gun.”

“It was about he wasn’t a beefer!” the woman exclaimed.

Even if Rainone had agreed to cooperate with the feds, Lopez said, “the people he knows are either dead or in jail.”

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @kimjnews

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
14 Points
New
1

Kohl’s holiday hiring to rise by a third

BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO | AP Retail Writer September 17, 2014 9:26AM NEW YORK . Kohl’s, based in Menomonee Falls, Wis., operates 1,163 stores in 49 states.

BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO | AP Retail Writer September 17, 2014 9:26AM

NEW YORK ? Kohl’s Corp. says it will hire more than 67,000 seasonal workers nationwide for the holiday shopping season, about a third more than last year’s 50,000.

The department store operator expects to hire an average of 50 associates per store, up 25 percent from a year ago. Kohl’s, based in Menomonee Falls, Wis., operates 1,163 stores in 49 states. It also expects to hire 9,300 people for jobs at its distribution centers and 670 people for seasonal positions in its credit operations.

A retailer’s hiring plans can indicate its expectations for the holiday shopping season, which accounts for 20 percent of the retail industry’s annual sales, according to the National Retail Federation.

Chicago Sun-Times
17/09
13 Points
1

Upon further review, Vikings bar Adrian Peterson from team activities

7, 2014, file photo, Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson warms up for an NFL football game against the St. By JON KRAWCZYNSKI AP Sports Writer September 17, 2014 9:42AM FILE - In this Sept. Several prominent NFL advertisers expressed concern about the league’s recent off-the-field problems, including the indictment of Peterson. (AP Photo/Tom Gannam, File) MINNEAPOLIS .

By JON KRAWCZYNSKI AP Sports Writer September 17, 2014 9:42AM

FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2014, file photo, Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson warms up for an NFL football game against the St. Louis Rams in St. Louis. The Vikings benched Peterson for Sunday's game after his attorney said he had been indicted by a Texas grand jury on a charge of child abuse. Attorney Rusty Hardin says the charge accuses Peterson of using a branch, or switch, to spank his son. He says Peterson has cooperated with authorities and "used his judgment as a parent to discipline his son." Hardin says Peterson regrets the incident but never intended to harm the boy. (AP Photo/Tom Gannam, File)

MINNEAPOLIS ? Minnesota Vikings owners are scheduled to address their middle-of-the-night decision to put Adrian Peterson on hiatus.

The Vikings say owners Zygi Wilf and Mark Wilf will lead off a news conference at team headquarters. The organization has reversed course by using an NFL exemption to take Peterson off the active roster while he tends to a child-abuse charge in Texas. Just a day-and-a-half earlier, the Vikings declared the star running back would rejoin the team.

But the backlash to that announcement was significant. Peterson lost endorsements. The Vikings had at least one major sponsorship suspended. Several prominent NFL advertisers expressed concern about the league’s recent off-the-field problems, including the indictment of Peterson.

Chicago Sun-Times
17/09
13 Points
1

First-and-10: Jay Cutler becomes a leader

A week ago against the Buffalo Bills, the Bears’ $127 million quarterback put up impressive numbers but made one big mistake . BY MARK POTASHStaff Reporter September 15, 2014 9:16PM  Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) passes against the San Francisco 49ers during the second quarter of an NFL football game in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday, Sept.

BY MARK POTASHStaff Reporter September 15, 2014 9:16PM

 

Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) passes against the San Francisco 49ers during the second quarter of an NFL football game in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar) ORG XMIT: FXN117

Updated: September 17, 2014 9:12AM

Will the real Jay Cutler please stand up?

A week ago against the Buffalo Bills, the Bears’ $127 million quarterback put up impressive numbers but made one big mistake ? committing a series of cardinal sins on one ill-fated play ? and punctuated another disappointing performance with a fit of petulance in his postgame interview. It was all too typical of Cutler’s star-crossed career (eight seasons with one playoff appearance).

He was almost the opposite Sunday against the San Francisco 49ers. He threw for only 176 yards but did what winning quarterbacks do. He maintained his focus, led his team through rough waters, made big plays and took advantage of the opportunities presented by a team that was asking to be beaten.

Suddenly, Cutler is a leader of men after the Bears rallied from a 17-0 deficit in the first half to win 28-20 at Levi’s Stadium.

‘‘Jay kept telling us we were still in it,’’ tight end Martellus Bennett said. ‘‘He did a great job of controlling the emotions of each player on offense. We have a fiery bunch, and everyone wants to make a play.

‘‘He did a great job with the coaches, worrying about the next drive and not what just happened. When your quarterback does that, then everyone does. He just gets you ready for the next drive. He did a great job with the next-play mentality.’’

It remains to be seen whether the gaffe against the Bills or the heady leadership and four touchdown passes without an interception against the 49ers is the defining moment of Cutler’s season. After two weeks, it doesn’t appear there is any such thing as a defining moment in the NFL. Every week is a new week. We have no idea which Bears team or which Cutler we’ll see Monday at the Meadowlands. But if Cutler’s poise and leadership were as big as they appeared to be in the stunning comeback against the 49ers, the Bears ultimately might become the team many of us thought they were.

? 2. The rest of this season will determine where the comeback against the 49ers ranks among the greatest escape acts in Bears history. If this sparks them to a

big season, it might be as big as any of them.

Though the ‘‘Miracle in the Desert’’ against the Arizona Cardinals in 2006 was more exciting and entertaining, the Bears were 5-0, had outscored their opponents 156-36 and were 121/2-point favorites at the time. They were going to be a playoff contender even if they had lost.

This presented a greater degree of difficulty, playing the 49ers on the road in a nationally televised game as seven-point underdogs. If this turns the Bears’ season around, it will be hard to argue the impact of the unlikeliest of comebacks as the best of recent Bears history.

? 3. Brandon Marshall, who is prone to getting carried away when it comes to his teammates, went a little overboard in saying rookie cornerback Kyle Fuller ‘‘needs to have Hall of Fame on his brain’’ after making two interceptions Sunday.

But he wasn’t totally off-base. Of all the plays the Bears made against the 49ers, Fuller’s first interception ? in which he defended a pass to receiver Michael Crabtree and took the ball from him in the same motion ? stands out as the kind of special play that portends greatness.

Fuller wasn’t just in the right spot at the right time; he got the ball because he wanted it more and had the skill to make it happen. It’s not quite the same as Charles Tillman’s end-zone takeaway from Randy Moss as a rookie in 2003, but it was similar ? a sign of good things to come from the first-round draft choice.

? 4. If we’re going to keep the microscope on 2012 first-round pick Shea McClellin at strong-side linebacker, we can’t ignore the impressive game he played against the 49ers. Playing a quarterback and running attack that could have exposed his biggest weaknesses, McClellin instead showed that he’s at least making progress.

McClellin had three tackles, including a sack of Colin Kaepernick for a five-yard loss with the Bears leading 21-20 with 11:01 left in the fourth quarter.

? 5. Maybe coordinator Mel Tucker knows what he’s doing after all. The Bears’ defense produced four takeaways and four sacks and picked up momentum as the game went on. The Bears allowed 129 rushing yards in the first half (6.3 per carry) but 54 on 15 carries (3.6 per carry) in the second.

? 6. The Bears had only 216 yards of offense (4.2 per play) against the 49ers. But unlike the disastrous game against them at Candlestick Park in 2012, when they gained 168 yards with Jason Campbell at quarterback and lost 32-7, the Bears didn’t fold.

The last time the Bears gained 216 yards or fewer and beat a playoff team on the road was in 1991, when the 5-2 Bears rallied to beat the 7-0 Saints 20-17 at the Superdome with only 178 total yards. Quarterback Jim Harbaugh was horrible that day ? 4-for-21 for 49 yards ? until the very end, when he threw a 12-yard touchdown pass to Tom Waddle with 54 seconds left to win it.

? 7. Fairness department: A sidebar to Cutler’s tough week against the Bills was former Bears receiver Devin Hester’s outstanding game for the Atlanta Falcons against the Saints (five receptions for 99 yards). Hester never really had a day like that with Cutler. For the record, Hester had one catch for two yards in the Falcons’ loss Sunday to the Cincinnati Bengals.

? 8. Highly recommend the perfectly charred Kansas City ribs at Lance Briggs’ Double Nickel Smokehouse in Elk Grove, California. With its 12 big-screen TVs, spacious sports-bar atmosphere and down-home Northern California feel, the Double Nickel is an inviting place to watch NFL games. Lots of Dallas Cowboys fans were there Sunday.

Good food, good atmosphere and easy to get to. Just take I-80 west 2,045 miles to South Sacramento Freeway South and take the Laguna Boulevard exit. You can’t miss it.

? 9. Ex-Bears player of the week: Bills cornerback Corey Graham followed up his impressive performance against his former team with another big game in a 29-10 victory against the Miami Dolphins. Graham had 10 tackles and three pass breakups as the Bills shut down a Dolphins offense that scored 33 points last week against the New England Patriots.

? 10. On paper, the Bears’ playoff chances took a huge jump with the victory against the 49ers. Since 1990, only 11.6 percent of teams that have started 0-2 have made the playoffs. But in the last 10 years, 40.1 percent of 1-1 teams have made it. So, mathematically at least, the Bears’ chances are better now than when they started the season 0-0. Only 37.5 percent of the NFL’s 32 teams make the postseason.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @MarkPotash

Chicago Sun-Times
17/09
13 Points
1

Appeals court to decide if Beanie Baby billionaire got off easy

Circuit Court of Appeals urged Petersen to explain what exactly Kocoras did wrong in sentencing Warner to probation. At Warner’s sentencing, Kocoras was visibly moved by the 70 letters of support sent by beneficiaries of Warner’s largesse, including charities and sick employees he helped. If they decide Warner should be re-sentenced, the case could be kicked back to another district court judge. It could take hours, days or months, said federal court spokesman Randall Samborn.

BY MITCH DUDEK Staff Reporter September 17, 2014 1:12PM

Beanie Baby creator Ty Warner (center) is shown leaving the Dirksen Federal Building last year. | Chandler West/For Sun-Times Media

 Sentencing memo for Ty Warner

 Prosecution appeal brief for Ty Warner

 Letter to judge on behalf of Ty Warner

Updated: September 17, 2014 5:32PM

Federal appeals court judges heard arguments Wednesday morning on whether to scrap the original sentence of probation and open the possibility of a prison term for convicted tax cheat and billionaire Beanie Baby magnate Ty Warner.

“Judges do make mistakes from time to time,” said Assistant U.S. Attorney Michelle Petersen, who argued the sentence was too light to deter other tax cheats.

“In this case, the district court simply assigned too much weight to the defendant’s charity and ignored other sentencing factors.”

In February, Judge Charles Kocoras sentenced Warner to two years probation and 500 hours community service for hiding $100 million in secret Swiss bank accounts. At Warner’s sentencing, Kocoras was visibly moved by the 70 letters of support sent by beneficiaries of Warner’s largesse, including charities and sick employees he helped. He gushed in January that Warner had exhibited a “depth of humanity” that he had never seen in any other criminal defendant.

He noted at the time that the enormous $53 million fine Warner agreed to pay dwarfed the estimated $5 million in taxes he dodged and said: “Society will be best served by allowing him to continue to do his good works.”

The government balked at the notion.

“Any term of incarceration would help deter a would-be tax evader,” Petersen said Wednesday. “Otherwise a tax evader might think, ‘Probation isn’t really so bad, I’m willing to take the risk.’”

On Wednesday morning, a panel of three judges from the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals urged Petersen to explain what exactly Kocoras did wrong in sentencing Warner to probation.

“I’m going to tell you what really bothers me is that all the arguments in the case and thus far today ignore the considerable discretion that district courts enjoy in fashioning a sentence,” Judge Ilana Rovner said. “You’ve got Judge Kocoras here, a veteran judge, certainly not some bleeding heart Pollyanna, who obviously agonized and agonized over this sentence. He knew it wouldn’t be a popular sentence.”

Warner’s attorneys wrote in their filings earlier this year that Kocoras’ sentence was reasonable, noting that in more than half of similar cases of offshore tax-dodging schemes, defendants also avoided prison time.

Prosecutors argued that Warner’s crimes were on a far larger scale, adding that Kocoras gave too much weight to Warner’s charitable contributions, given his estimated $2.6 billion wealth.

It’s unclear when the appeals court will return a decision. It could take hours, days or months, said federal court spokesman Randall Samborn. If they decide Warner should be re-sentenced, the case could be kicked back to another district court judge. This was the case with corrupt politician Edward Vrdolyak, who was originally sentenced to probation in 2009, but was re-sentenced on appeal to serve a prison term.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @mitchdudek

Chicago Sun-Times
Today
10 Points
New
1

2014 MacArthur ‘genius grant’ winners unveiled

17, 2014, as one of 21 people to receive a "genius grant" from the Chicago-based MacArthur Foundation. MacArthur Foundation, materials scientist Mark Hersam works in a lab at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. The foundation pointed to her instrumental role in reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act by Congress in 2013 that restored some of those abilities to tribes.“For the first time since 1978 ... another topic of particular interest since Brown’s shooting .

By DON BABWIN Associated Press September 17, 2014 12:36AM

In this Sept. 8, 2014 photo provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, materials scientist Mark Hersam works in a lab at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. Hersam was named Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, as one of 21 people to receive a "genius grant" from the Chicago-based MacArthur Foundation. (AP Photo/Courtesy of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

CHICAGO ? A professor whose research is helping a California police department improve its strained relationship with the black community and a lawyer who advocates for victims of domestic abuse are among the 21 winners of this year’s MacArthur Foundation “genius grants.”

The Chicago-based John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced on Wednesday the 2014 recipients, who will each receive $625,000 to spend any way they like.

Three Illinois winners include Mark Hersam, 39, of Northwestern University in Evanston; Tami Bond, 50, of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and Tara Zahra, 38, University of Chicago.

Hersam is a materials scientist who draws “on techniques from a variety of fields in investigations of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of nanomaterials, offering new promise for applied uses,” according to the foundation.

Bond is an environmental engineer working on “unraveling the global effects of black carbon emissions, or soot, on climate and human health, whose work is playing a key role in understanding the complex relationship between energy and climate change.”

Zahra, a historian of modern Europe, combines “extensive archival research with broad sociohistorical analysis of notions of nation, family, and ethnicity to construct an integrative, transnational understanding of events in 20th century Europe.”

The professor and lawyer, part of an eclectic group that also includes scientists, mathematicians, historians, a cartoonist and a composer, are among several recipients whose work involves topics that have dominated the news in the past year.

“I think getting this [grant] speaks to people’s sense that this is the kind of work that needs to be done,” said recipient Jennifer Eberhardt, a Stanford University social psychologist who has researched racial stereotypes and crime.

Her work prompted the Oakland, California, police department to ask for her help studying racial biases among its officers and how those biases play out on the street ? topics that have been debated nationally in the wake of the police shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old in Missouri. Eberhardt, who is also studying the use of body cameras by police ? another topic of particular interest since Brown’s shooting ? said, “I hope this will show the work matters, holds value and promotes social change.”

The justice system is also at the heart of Sarah Deer’s work as a legal scholar and advocate for Native American women living on reservations, who suffer higher-than-average rates of domestic abuse and sexual violence.

Deer, a Native American who teaches law in Minnesota, met with women who simply stopped reporting such attacks because their tribal governments had been stripped of the authority to investigate and because federal authorities were often unwilling to do so, she said. The foundation pointed to her instrumental role in reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act by Congress in 2013 that restored some of those abilities to tribes.

“For the first time since 1978 ... tribes (can) prosecute non-Indians who have committed acts of sexual assault and domestic violence on reservations,” she said.

Like Deer, fellow recipient Jonathan Rapping has worked to improve the lives of others.

A former public defender, Rapping founded Gideon’s Promise after seeing a legal system that he said valued speed over quality representation of the indigent. The organization trains, mentors and assist public defenders to help them withstand the intense pressure that can come with massive caseloads.

Today, the program that began in 2007 for 16 attorneys in two offices in Georgia and Louisiana has more than 300 participants in 15 states.

The foundation recognized Khaled Mattawa, an associate professor at the University of Michigan, for his poetry and translations of Arab contemporary poets.

Mattawa, who said he started translating the poetry as way to teach himself to write poetry, said the work can connect people from different cultures. “The poets are bearing witness not only to the humanity of their own people but of a shared humanity,” he said.

The awards, given annually since 1981, are doled out over a five-year period. This year’s class brings the number of recipients to more than 900. Shrouded in secrecy, the selection process doesn’t involve applications. Instead, anonymous groups make nominations and recommendations to the foundation’s board of directors.

Most winners are not widely known outside their fields, but the list has over the years included such writers as Susan Sontag and Karen Russell and filmmaker John Sayles.

Chicago Sun-Times
17/09
17 Points
1

Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art hosts retrospective of David Bowie’s extraordinary career, life

Hedy Weiss Sun-times THEATER critic September 17, 2014 5:11PM David Bowie, 1983 | RALPH GATTI/AFP/Getty Images ‘David Bowie Is,’ Sept.

Hedy Weiss Sun-times THEATER critic September 17, 2014 5:11PM

David Bowie, 1983 | RALPH GATTI/AFP/Getty Images

David Bowie Is,’ Sept. 23, 2014- Jan. 4, 2015, Museum of Contemporary Art, 220 E. Chicago. $25. (312) 280-2660; mcachicago.org/bowie

Updated: September 17, 2014 5:17PM

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Dow closes at record after Fed keeps rates intact

For many investors, that meant the first hike won’t come until the middle of next year.The Dow rose 24.88 points, or 0.2 percent, to end at 17,156.85 . THE ASSOCIATED PRESS September 17, 2014 8:50AM The Dow Jones industrial average closed at a record high Wednesday after the Federal Reserve maintained its stance on record-low interest rates.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS September 17, 2014 8:50AM

The Dow Jones industrial average closed at a record high Wednesday after the Federal Reserve maintained its stance on record-low interest rates. | AP Photo

Updated: September 17, 2014 3:47PM

NEW YORK ? The stock market rose Wednesday after the Federal Reserve told investors to expect low interest rates for a while yet, pushing the Dow Jones industrial average to a record high.

After drifting along for most of the day, stocks marched higher after the U.S. central bank released a statement signaling little change in its interest rate policy. The gains were broad, with seven of the 10 industry groups of the Standard & Poor’s 500 index ended up, led by materials stocks.

The Fed statement put to rest an anxious waiting game among investors that has left the S&P 500 moving between small gains and losses for a week. A rise in the short-term rates that the Fed controls has triggered stock drops in the past.

“The Fed is not going to take the punch bowl away,” said Brad McMillan, chief investment officer for Commonwealth Financial. “They didn’t want to spook the market.”

In its statement, the central bank retained language in that it plans to keep short-term rates low “for a considerable time” after it ends its monthly bond purchases in November. For many investors, that meant the first hike won’t come until the middle of next year.

The Dow rose 24.88 points, or 0.2 percent, to end at 17,156.85 ? its 16th record high this year. The S&P 500 edged up 2.59 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,001.57, falling short of its own closing high of 2,007.71 from Sept. 5.

The Nasdaq composite was up 9.43 points, or 0.2 percent, to 4,562.19, still well below its dot-com era peak.

Shares of home builders jumped after builder confidence in the market for new homes rose to its highest level in nearly nine years. Miami-based Lennar Corp. rose nearly 6 percent, the most in the S&P 500 index.

In economic news, U.S. consumer prices edged down in August, the first monthly drop since the spring of 2013, as gasoline, airline tickets and clothing prices all fell. It was the latest evidence that inflation remains under control, one of the factors the Fed uses in its decisions on rates.

DuPont surged $3.42 to $69.25, or 5.2 percent, the biggest gain in the Dow by far. Investors bought the stock on news that activist investor Nelson Peltz had sent a letter to the company’s board suggesting it split in two. His Trian Fund Management LP said it has been in private talks with DuPont for more than a year to boost shareholder value and improve its financial performance.

Gold, which was flat minutes before the Fed news on interest rates, ended down 80 cents, or 0.1 percent, to $1,235.90 an ounce. Silver rose 1.3 cents, or 0.1 percent, to $18.73 an ounce. Copper fell 2.3 cents, or 0.7 percent, to $3.14 a pound.

In government bond trading, the yield on the 10-year Treasury note edged up to 2.62 percent, from 2.59 percent late Tuesday. The yield has moved between a high of 3 percent and a low of 2.34 percent this year.

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Fed signals plan to keep key rate at record low

The Federal Reserve signaled Wednesday that it plans to keep a key interest rate at a record low for a considerable period because a broad range of U.S. By MARTIN CRUTSINGER | AP Economics Writer September 17, 2014 1:36PM The Federal Reserve signaled Wednesday it plans to keep a key interest rate at a record low for a considerable period because a broad range of U.S.

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER | AP Economics Writer September 17, 2014 1:36PM

The Federal Reserve signaled Wednesday it plans to keep a key interest rate at a record low for a considerable period because a broad range of U.S. economic measures remain subpar. | AP file photo

WASHINGTON ? The Federal Reserve signaled Wednesday that it plans to keep a key interest rate at a record low for a considerable period because a broad range of U.S. economic measures remain subpar.

The Fed said it planned to keep its benchmark rate near zero as long as inflation remains under control, until it sees consistent gains in wage growth, long-term unemployment and other gauges of the job market.

The Fed retained language signaling its plans to keep short-term rates low “for a considerable time” after it ends its monthly bond purchases after its next meeting in October.

In a statement ending its latest policy meeting, the Fed says it will make another $10 billion cut in the pace of its purchases, which have been intended to keep long-term borrowing rates low.

On the eve of the Fed’s meeting, the financial world was on high alert for the words “considerable time.” The Fed’s recent statements had said it expected to keep its key short-term rate near zero for a “considerable time” after it ended its bond buying. Its purchases have been intended to keep long-term rates down.

Most economists have said they think the Fed will raise rates starting around mid-2015. But as the U.S. economy has strengthened, speculation has intensified about whether it might do so sooner, perhaps by March.

Chair Janet Yellen will be pressed to clarify the Fed’s intentions when she holds a news conference later Wednesday.

With job growth solid, manufacturing and construction growing and unemployment at a near-normal 6.1 percent, many analysts had suggested that the Fed was edging closer to a rate increase to prevent a rising economy from igniting inflation.

Other economic gauges have strengthened, too. The number of U.S. job openings is near its highest level in 13 years. Layoffs have dwindled. And consumer confidence has reached its highest point in nearly seven years.

Despite the steady decline in unemployment, Yellen has cautioned that it may overstate the job market’s improvement. She has said the Fed also takes into account the number of people unemployed for more than six months; the number of part-timers who want full-time work; and average wages. Those measures remain less than healthy.

Over the past several years, the Fed’s ultra-low rates have helped the economy, cheered the stock market and shrunk mortgage rates. A rate increase could threaten to reverse those trends.

In August, U.S. employers added just 142,000 jobs, well below the 212,000 average of the previous 12 months. The slowdown was seen as likely temporary. But some analysts said it underscored that the economic outlook might remain too hazy for the Fed to signal an earlier-than-expected rate hike.

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Jameis Winston benched for vulgar comments

Winston threw for 444 yards, three touchdowns and ran for another score in a game that put him in the driver’s seat for the Heisman trophy.“I want to be out on the field with my team, but I did something, so I have to accept the consequences,” Winston said. That same month, Winston and teammate Chris Casher were held at gunpoint by campus police for hunting squirrels. He did not allow Winston to answer three different questions during the nearly nine-minute session.

By KAREEM COPELAND Associated Press September 17, 2014 4:18PM

FILE - In this July 20, 2014, file photo, Florida State's Jameis Winston answers a question during a news conference at the Atlantic Coast Conference Football kickoff in Greensboro, N.C. Winston has made lewd comments about women and Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher says he is deciding whether to bench the Seminoles' quarterback for his "derogatory" remarks. Several students tweeted Winston stood on campus Tuesday and shouted a lascivious comment that may have derived from an internet meme. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. ? Jameis Winston has been benched for the first half of Saturday’s game against Clemson after making “offensive and vulgar” comments about women and Florida State officials say that the quarterback will undergo internal discipline.

The decision was announced Wednesday in a joint statement by Florida State interim President Dr. Garnett S. Stokes and athletic director Stan Wilcox. Several students tweeted Winston stood on campus Tuesday and shouted a lascivious comment about female anatomy that may have derived from an internet meme.

The president and AD said, “As the university’s most visible ambassadors, student-athletes at Florida State are expected to uphold at all times high standards of integrity and behavior that reflect well upon themselves, their families, coaches, teammates, the Department of Athletics and Florida State University. Student-athletes are expected to act in a way that reflects dignity and respect for others.”

The 20-year-old Winston addressed his inappropriate comments before Wednesday’s practice at his weekly press conference, saying: “I have to tone it down.”

The Heisman Trophy winner gave a statement in which he added, “I just want to apologize to my university, my coaches and my teammates. I’m not a me person, but in that situation it was a selfish act. That’s not how you do things. I really want to apologize to my teammates because I have now made a selfish act for them.”

Winston’s latest poor off-field decision comes when Florida State is under scrutiny.

Florida State is currently under investigation by the Department of Education for the way it handles reports of sexual assault, including a case involving Winston. The investigation was prompted by a complaint from a FSU student who says Winston assaulted her in 2012.

Florida State Attorney Willie Meggs declined to press charges against Winston last fall.

A lawyer for the woman says the university is currently conducting its own investigation of that incident.

Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher had said earlier Wednesday that the quarterback would be held accountable for his “derogatory” remarks.

“It’s not something we want or we’re indicative of and it’s not a good decision,” Fisher said. “It was something that has to be addressed.

“You can’t make certain statements that are derogatory or inflammatory in any way toward any person, race, gender,” said Fisher, whose top-ranked Seminoles host No. 22 Clemson on Saturday in an Atlantic Coast Conference showdown. “The statements in which you make are always going to be made more public than statements that other individuals make,” the coach said. “And that’s just the nature of the business of who you are and what you are. That’s the situation it is and you have to understand that.”

Winston is no stranger to unwanted attention.

While playing for Florida State baseball team, he was suspended for three games and completed 20 hours of community service after acknowledging he stole $32 worth of crab legs from a local grocery store in April. He faced criticism nationwide and was the subject of taunts and jokes in print, online and on social media.

Winston has had other run-ins with police since enrolling at Florida State. Police questioned Winston and other FSU players in November 2012 after 13 windows were broken at an apartment complex near Doak Campbell Stadium after an apparent BB gun battle. That same month, Winston and teammate Chris Casher were held at gunpoint by campus police for hunting squirrels. The two told police they were shooting squirrels with a pellet gun along a bike trail. Police were also called after a Burger King employee called to complain that Winston was stealing soda.

Winston was not arrested in any of those three incidents.

The Seminoles rolled over Clemson last season 51-14 en route to a national championship. Winston threw for 444 yards, three touchdowns and ran for another score in a game that put him in the driver’s seat for the Heisman trophy.

“I want to be out on the field with my team, but I did something, so I have to accept the consequences,” Winston said. “I’m going to apologize to my team. We’re not going to think about that, because we don’t think about negative things. We’re going to think about moving forward and winning the game.”

Florida State sports information director Elliott Finebloom asked for football-related questions only after Winston read his statement. He did not allow Winston to answer three different questions during the nearly nine-minute session. The last time ended the press conference.

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Father of woman Brandon Marshall dated calling for Roger Goodell’s resignation

ASSOCIATED PRESS September 17, 2014 5:04PM One day after saying his hip was still bothersome from off-season surgery, Brandon Marshall failed to show up at Bears practice on Wednesday. Watley called the NFL’s investigation one-sided.Attorney Gloria Allred called the press conference amid increasing attention on how the league handles domestic violence allegations.

ASSOCIATED PRESS September 17, 2014 5:04PM

One day after saying his hip was still bothersome from off-season surgery, Brandon Marshall failed to show up at Bears practice on Wednesday. | Getty Images

Updated: September 17, 2014 5:13PM

MARIETTA, Ga. ? The father of a woman who once dated NFL receiver Brandon Marshall is calling for the league’s commissioner to resign because he’s disappointed in the way it handled his daughter’s abuse case.

Clarence Watley spoke Wednesday at a news conference about his daughter, Rasheedah Watley, who he said was abused by Marshall.

Marshall was with the Denver Broncos and now plays for the Chicago Bears. He was suspended for three games in 2008, but the suspension was reduced to one game. He has denied the allegations.

Watley says he and others wrote to Commissioner Roger Goodell about the case and never heard back from league officials. Watley called the NFL’s investigation one-sided.

Attorney Gloria Allred called the press conference amid increasing attention on how the league handles domestic violence allegations.

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